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Thread: .45 ACP or 9mm

  1. #21
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    Just bought my wife the SR40 a couple months ago...great feel, fit, and for $399.......great buy..........

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  3. #22
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    is it possible to get it without the trigger saftey?
    Not that I'm aware of.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    also, they had a used M&P .45 for $450. That seemed like a good price, but I am still undecided on what caliber is best for me.
    Stay away from used as a new shooter. Buy a new gun that has a factory warranty. You, and possibly the LGS, have no clue how the gun was maintained or even if the previous owner was an amateur gunsmith and used the gun for practice. The few bucks you save will not be worth the potential problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    also handled the ruger SP9 and SP40 and liked how they fit my hand, but the guy selling guns was steering me away from them and towards the XDM that i also showed intrest in. Any thoughts on that from you guys?
    You get the gun YOU want, not what the guy behind the counter says to get or even what we say here. The LGS clerk may honestly have your best interests at heart, but then again, you don't know his level of knowledge and he may be pushing guns they have an excess inventory of, pays a better commission, there is a manufacturer sales contest on, what his manager says to sell, or personal preference. Ruger makes a solid gun for a decent price.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    One other gun he recommended that i check out was a EAA. I liked the weight/balance of it (steel framed gun) but i am not sure i like the thumb saftey. this is also the reason i am steering away from 1911's. i like the idea of being able to shoot as soon as the gun is in my hand without any step that is required.
    Thumb safety is all about practice. If you're willing to put in the time, it's a non-issue.

  4. #23
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    ...Stay away from used as a new shooter. Buy a new gun that has a factory warranty. You, and possibly the LGS, have no clue how the gun was maintained or even if the previous owner was an amateur gunsmith and used the gun for practice. The few bucks you save will not be worth the potential problems...
    I disagree completely.
    A used gun represents "the most bang for the buck."
    Make an agreement with the seller that you will have the used gun surveyed by an independent gunsmith and, if the report is too bad, you have permission to return the gun for full credit against another. Then repeat the process until you find a pistol you like that the gunsmith OKs.

    Most used guns are both comparatively inexpensive and in acceptable condition.

    With the exception of Jean's Kel-Tec P3AT, my Star PD, and the Mossberg .22 of my youth, we have never owned a new gun.
    Also, we have never bought, traded-for, or been given an unusable gun—excepting one that we were left, in a mentor's will (which was easily repaired, though).
    Last edited by Steve M1911A1; 10-08-2012 at 05:45 PM. Reason: (I corrected a bit of misinformation.)

  5. #24
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Make an agreement with the seller that you will have the used gun surveyed by an independent gunsmith and, if the report is too bad, you have permission to return the gun for full credit against another. Then repeat the process until you find a pistol you like that the gunsmith OKs.
    I guess I'm a little gun shy (pun intended) as very recently I was screwed over by a LGS on a used gun that looked, and they claimed to be, in fantastic condition. After multiple problems with the gun, I returned it and they gave me credit, but then could not/would not get me any of the guns I wanted to replace the POS they sold me. Keep in mind all the guns I wanted were in stock and available on-line, so if I had my cash in hand, I would have been able to get any of the guns on my list. Instead, for a couple weeks I was sitting on a $700+ credit with a shop I no longer trusted or wanted to do business with, and was going back and forth with them trying to find a gun that I wanted and they could/would get. Eventually I did get a gun, that I had to order, but ended up paying $300 more just to end the situation; and even then they tried to ring the gun up for $100 more than they quoted me. If the OP takes your advice, which is a valid alternative, I would strongly suggest he takes it one step further and gets, in writing, that he can have a full refund and not just a credit.

  6. #25
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    The "in writing" part is an excellent suggestion. I used to include that, in this kind of advice; but for some reason, I forgot it this time.

    Considering the small margins upon which a gun shop operates, I wouldn't ask for a possible refund. I don't believe that any shop would give it.
    But any reputable shop should be OK with return-for-credit.
    (Of course, caveat emptor, and all that. The prospective purchaser has got to do some research, to find a reputable store. One mustn't just go anywhere.)

  7. #26
    Russ is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    I am in the market for my first handgun. I have shot several including .22, .40 sub compact, .40 full size, and 38 special revolver.

    I'm am looking for a gun for home defense, and some recreational range shooting. I don't plan on carrying much, but I would carry occasionally after I get my permit.

    I really want an xdm 45 but some people say that a 9 mm can be just as good for defense but is much cheaper to shoot. I think part of the reason I like the 45, is because it is more manly to have a big caliber gun. I am also concerned that the 9 mm could have a higher risk of over penetration in a home defense scenario.

    I am pretty confident that I want a springfield, but am open to hearing other thoughts

    let me know what you think.

    Thanks!
    Fishwiz4

    I own a Springfield XD 45 and S&W M&P Shield 9mm.

    Shooting Speers Gold Dot +P 124 JHP short barrel from my Shield 9mm is manly and YouTube ballistic gel tests will confirm my assertion.

    Modern defense ammo should calm any concerns regarding over penetration.

    I really enjoy shooting 9mm rounds. The low recoil makes for quick followup shots.

    Springfield makes a fine weapon but for concealment I prefer my Shield and I have owned a Kahr CM9 and Beretta Nano both in 9 mm and the Shield is my favorite even over my Springfield 45.

    Good luck and take your time choosing your weapon.

    Russ

  8. #27
    Ernest_T is offline Junior Member
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    Hey, I'm also a total NEWBIE here, and still shopping for my first handgun, but I can echo the advice given above "Shoot before you buy". I've shot a total of 7 different pistols in my search so far, and one thing that has become very clear is that a gun that feels good in your hand may not perform the best for you on the range. So, my word of advice is take your time and find a local range or ranges that rent guns and test out as many models as possible before you make a decision. When I started shopping, I was pretty much ready to buy a Glock, until the very nice guy at the gun store convinced me to try a few different brands on the range before I made a decision............now I'm very glad I did. The Glock which felt great at the counter, did not work for me on the range. I did really like the S&W M&P 9mm which is on your list, which is a gun that I had not even considered until I tried it.

    Good luck in your search!

  9. #28
    Gorris is offline Junior Member
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    I was in the same position you were when I bought my first gun and I will tell you to go with a 9mm. I say this for a couple of reasons. One the ammo is a lot cheaper to shoot so you can spend more time at the range working on your skills. The second reason is that the recoil is very low so you can get use to how the weapon fires and work on technique. The third reason is that you can get more bullets on target with this caliber because of the lower amount of recoil, which is a huge bonus since you are using the fun for home defense. The last thing is that with the 9mm you wont get tired as quick while at the range and won't risk injury from shooting large caliber bullets. I just read an article about this in the Nov/Dec issue of American Handgunner. So my vote is 9mm, you won't regret it.

  10. #29
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    Wandering Man is offline GM HGF Gold Member
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    It is good to see that you are asking about your "first" gun. As mentioned above, go with what your current and future budget will tolerate. If you plan to go to the range a lot for practice and fun, and have a limited budget, go with the 9mm. A .45 is not difficult to manage and is a great gun to shoot, but ammo is pricey.

    Even my wife, who once famously asked "why would anyone need more than one gun?" (she now owns 6), admits that guns make a decent investment. You don't lose much on the re-sale, if you find yourself needing to sell one gun so you have the cash for another.

    So, don't over think this. What you buy as your first gun will be fabulous, the best gun ever, and you'll regret having ever sold it, years down the road.

    Go get what you think you want, and get the training and practice you need to stay safe. You won't be sorry.
    Never argue with drunks or crazy people.

  11. #30
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorris View Post
    The last thing is that with the 9mm you wont get tired as quick while at the range and won't risk injury from shooting large caliber bullets. I just read an article about this in the Nov/Dec issue of American Handgunner.
    OK, I had to go find that article because what you were suggesting so astonished me and, after reading it, I think you missed the point of it. The author is talking about injury to your median nerve from using large-bore handguns (more like hand cannons) giving the .45-70 as an example. He did mention the 9mm and .45, but in passing. The .45 is not going to tire you out to the point of injury unless you're talking years and years of shooting thousands and thousands of rounds; at which point even 9mm could potentially cause an injury.

    Take what you read in the gun rags with a grain of salt. They're more ads than articles and I can't remember the last time one of them had a negative review on anything they ever tested.

  12. #31
    Gorris is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    OK, I had to go find that article because what you were suggesting so astonished me and, after reading it, I think you missed the point of it. The author is talking about injury to your median nerve from using large-bore handguns (more like hand cannons) giving the .45-70 as an example. He did mention the 9mm and .45, but in passing. The .45 is not going to tire you out to the point of injury unless you're talking years and years of shooting thousands and thousands of rounds; at which point even 9mm could potentially cause an injury.

    Take what you read in the gun rags with a grain of salt. They're more ads than articles and I can't remember the last time one of them had a negative review on anything they ever tested.
    Sorry about that I guess I misunderstood the article. I didn't really read the article for the reviews on guns I actually bought it because I was looking for training information. Thanks for the help though. I still think the 9mm is a great choice though.

  13. #32
    Scott9mm is offline Member
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    I'm a 9mm fan but American Rifleman did a recent stopping power showddown:

    Handgun Stopping Power: Sizing Up Your Options

    Note that all 9mm is not equal when it comes to self defense. But 9mm is hard to beat considering mag capacity, cost, effectiveness, and comfort ... plus there are MANY guns available in 9mm,

  14. #33
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    One to the heart with either will end the threat. As a newer shooter I would advocate the 9mm, you can always get a .45 down the road. Just do yourself a favor, which ever you decide on, take a training course to learn how to shoot it. It doesnt do you any good with either caliber, if you cant hit your target....

  15. #34
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    Re: .45 ACP or 9mm

    Quote Originally Posted by Harryball View Post
    One to the heart with either will end the threat. As a newer shooter I would advocate the 9mm, you can always get a .45 down the road. Just do yourself a favor, which ever you decide on, take a training course to learn how to shoot it. It doesnt do you any good with either caliber, if you cant hit your target....


    My plan is exactly what you have said here. I am planning on a 9mm unless I fall on love with a different caliber at the range, then I plan on finding a tactical type shooting class and taking classes for permit to carry.

    Thanks!

  16. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    My plan is exactly what you have said here. I am planning on a 9mm unless I fall on love with a different caliber at the range, then I plan on finding a tactical type shooting class and taking classes for permit to carry.

    Thanks!
    You should fall in love with a gun, not the caliber. that will come later on with experience. Take your permit safety class, then the real class. If you need help finding a class ( Professional training) send me a PM. In your profile it doesnt show what part of the country you are in.

  17. #36
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    Re: .45 ACP or 9mm

    I am in Eastern North Dakota.

  18. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    I am in Eastern North Dakota.
    I have a friend in ND. He was in the boarder patrol for 23 years. Maybe if you are close I could set up a meet and he could show you some things....

  19. #38
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwiz4 View Post
    then I plan on finding a tactical type shooting class.
    Putting the cart before the horse there a bit. A lot of those classes have prerequisites that you have taken intro courses first, so do that! Learn the basics and fundamentals before you literally start running around with a gun in a more advanced class.

  20. #39
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    Re: .45 ACP or 9mm

    That makes sense. Good point

  21. #40
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    I, too, am new to the gun scene. I've had a 45 for over 40 years, but never used it...until one of my sons purchased a Beretta 9mm and wanted to hit the range with his dad. I used the 45 for the first time in all these years, and realized it to be too large for a carry pistol. I will admit it is neat to have. I then purchased a Sig P238, thinking the smaller the gun, the better the carry. Now, after several months of searching the net and putting much more thought in the process, I re-thought the whole carry/home defense process. As every one here said, due your due dilligence in your searching. I used "Hickok45" for alot of my 'study'. I made a list of all 9mm carry type pistols and kept notes on pros and cons of each one. When I got it down to a couple, I went to the store to handle them and get a feel for each gun. To each his own, and this is not a recommendation, but I decided on the Springfield XDm 9mm compact...for both the size and carry options and for the mag capacity for a home defense gun. So, best of luch in your quest. As you can tell, I'm no expert, like many that have answered, but I have recently gone through a similar process as you are. Have fun. By the way, a really good source, from my search, is: SportsmansOutdoorSuperstore.

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