Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 36 of 36
  1. #21
    Cornelius is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5
    I think you are going about this correctly, in that you are actually trying a few guns out. Remember this, it will be your gun, not your boyfriiends or your neighbors or anyone on this sites gun. It has to be one you are comfortable with and can control and operate effectively and will actually use. You know how strong you you know your tolerance for recoil and also for noise, you know how much you want to spend and what feels good in your hands. I normally tell the first time people I am talking to that they should try and narrow down their selection, before they begin the WEB CONFUSION stage.

  2. #22
    DangeRuss's Avatar
    DangeRuss is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Near Traverse City, Michigan.
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    Listen to Steve.

    That's my advice.
    Good advice Holly !!


    Russ

  3. #23
    Texasmade is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Alvarado, TX
    Posts
    11
    I concur....
    Listen to Steve
    Personally look into CZ P75 Duty in 9mm, its a compact and accurate as all get out, about $400 bucks to boot.

  4. #24
    sonja is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DFW Texas
    Posts
    78
    Please do not start with an ultra-light weight 9mm, or a snub nosed revolver. Esp. if a new shooter.

    Why?

    Well, a snubbie has a very short sight radius and will be difficult to aim well. A very light semi-auto will punish your hand -- as a result, you just won't want to shoot it.

    Perhaps a revolver with a 4" barrel -- let's say a .357 mag - but start off shooting 38 Special out of it. Not a difficult gun to shoot so you can gain confidence.

    Another alternative is the Springfield XDm in 9mm -- the compact model is accurate and soft shooting. If you decide you need something smaller, you can always pick up an LCP, LC9, etc. I'd stay away from 40S&W at first, same with 357 Sig, etc. 9mm is reasonably inexpensive to shoot. It will allow you to learn the basic skills. At some point you might just want to shoot a 1911 in 45ACP. They are fun, and accurate - but that's later.

    I happen to carry either a Taurus revolver in 327 Federal or a Sig 238 in 380. The Sig is a small pistol - and since I have fairly big hands grip becomes very important. If I don't practice with it on a regular basis, I can't shoot it worth a darn. The little snubbie, for some reason, I shoot better than I ever expected. Perhaps it's a matter of lower expectations.

    Before I forget -- when I shoot the 327 at the range, I usually practice with 32 H&R magnum rounds - much lighter to practice with. The rounds are fairly pricey so it is a commitment.

  5. #25
    Stevebitt300 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    6
    Why is it a problem if someone wants a specific type of instructor?

    It's Glassygals money. She can spend it as she likes.

    I know my daughter prefers a woman.
    My wife doesn't care.

    Women and men to teach differently. Neither is better because of their sex. But the level of communication may be different

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    101
    say what they want but when the shooting starts people run no matter how big the gun is. 9mm like a glock 26 is very mild recoil or a lady smith in a 38 is a good choice.

    simple fact is no matter what gun you get you are gonna have to deal with recoil so learn to do that and what ever gun you get you will be happy with

  7. #27
    kompactkites is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    43
    If i got shot with a pellet gun id proly turn away, lol.
    I dont have a WHOLE lot of gun experience, but I have to say, i have shot several handguns and I am really glad I purchased my IWI Magnum Research Desert Eagle 9mm
    Magnum Research
    This gun is known for its comfort and accuracy and smooth action, although a tad heavy but like my favorite movie snatch says
    "Heavy is good...Heavy is reliable.....If it does not work you can always hit him with it" - Heavy russian accent. LOL

  8. #28
    Idahokid is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Hayden Lake,Idaho
    Posts
    42
    My wife got a Ruger SP101 in a 21/8 Barrel.The guy at the gun store handed her a small pistol to see if she could rack the slide.It was tough to do.The shorter the barrel,the stiffer the recoil spring.A revolver is easy to use and less things to go wrong when you need it most.She punches .38 at the range and does well.And the end of are shooting session,She will punch some .357 rounds threw it.I myself carry a Beretta Nano.

  9. #29
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    Half of racking any slide is strength, and the other half is technique. There will always be a trade-off in handguns... longer barreled, heavier guns will generate less perceived recoil.

    Be glad there's a choice, and safely enjoy whatever it is you choose.

  10. #30
    SigmaBoy is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    58
    Just get a 500 express revolver, the sight of it will have 'em running. You'll never need to fire it.

    (NOTICE: This post is a joke)

  11. #31
    Zuzu is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5
    Female Firearm help!
    Hi,
    I am fairly new to shooting and I was looking for a 9MM to start but then fell in love with my boyfriends Ruger 10/22...while a rifle won't work for Conceal Carry, I am torn between what to do....I've seen plenty of video on .22 for personal protection and heard they pros vs cons... but its so economical that I am still leaning toward it... and 10-22 rounds of a .22 placed together in a nice grouping, will hurt....I almost feel like with a 7-8 clip magazine if I have 3 people break in my house my shots are very limited, so if I miss it could be a problem....

    I shot a Kahr Arms CM9 and loved it.. but there are no safety features on it and for a first time gun owner, I don't think I am ready for that....I shot a Kel-Tec PF9 and HATED it. It was far too heavy and rough on recoil, same with Taurus 45.

    I have been told to get a Ruger LC9 or for $50 more, a Ruger LC9 with laser (but then was told that it adds 1 more button to think about with all the additional safety features)

    I have been told to get a Taurus 40 Slim, A Ruger SR22, Walther P22, Springfield XD9 Compact.... I am so torn because none of our ranges have these guns available to practice on and I don't want something I will regret.

    Any helpful quick tips??
    First thing, sign up for a CCW class and be legal.
    W/r to handguns and caliber, it's very individual....ask a dozen shooters, get a dozen answers.
    Gender has nothing to do with your choice IMO....I'm a big guy and I don't think I'd want to tote a .44mag for CC.

    Now, hopefully you never have to draw on someone, but being prepared is what you want. And you must realize that you are not going to be setting up, drawing a bead on someone at 50 yards, etc. The vast majority of 'social opportunities' take place within a 3 foot distance. A lot of people talk of shot placement which is important, but the main thing is to have the gun in your hand and firing without hesitation until the life or death situation is over. And you know to never go with someone against your will or get into the car with them. Even if they have a pistol. Best to be trained and draw and take your chances on their poor shooting. Seriously.

    Having said all that, I recommend after a handguns/carry class a strong consideration of a .38Special snubnose pistol with a hammer shroud (ie, 'hammerless.') The Smith and Wesson airweights, while not as comfortable to shoot as my steel S&W 60, will be easier to carry in your purse or coat pocket. The hammer shroud/cover will prevent the hammer from catching on your clothing or stuff in your purse. And if you see one of those Smith .38's in hot pink, consider it. Seriously....not because it looks 'girly', but because an orange or pink revolver will be easier to see in dim lighting in your purse. W/r to ammo, 38Special +P ammo will take care of you if you have some training and practice. While there are lots of 9mm pistols with more firepower/capacity, revolvers are no brainers....pull and shoot. No safeties.

    Lots of quibbling about how many pounds of trigger pull, etc, but in a life or death situation, a whole nuther set of neurons in your brain and muscles will be firing and you won't know 12 pounds from 5 pounds. Seriously. I have pulled and fired (revolver) in such a situation and never felt the 15 pound pull.....barely heard the pistol report either.... Ayoob Massad discusses this phenomenom in some of his books...... in such situations, you will not be you. Therefore, practice is needed to be able to act swiftly and efficiently without thinking of what to do. Once you have assessed that your life or another's is in immediate danger, you must act.

    A CC weapon is not supposed to be your range gun or your plinking piece. Lasers and lights have their place in home defense, but IMHO in an impromptu social gathering of the perverse type, it's all about split second resolution and then function.

    Of course....best to not be there in the first place!

    Zuzu's rules for guns and defense........
    1. Avoid situations that could lead to danger. If in doubt, stay out!
    2. If situation arises, run!!!! And FCOL, ladies, don't be walking about in stilletos....change to sneakers before hitting the streets.
    3. Be competent with your firearm in case you do have to draw. Practice will make shot placement almost reflexive.
    -the old saying is two in the chest and one in the head......I would modify that a bit and say aim lower (if you have the presense of mind)
    perps have continued with 2 shots in the chest, but a shot near the pelvis or hip joint and the perp is gonna slow down and probably go down.
    4. Have the best stopper caliber you feel comfortable with. If you can handle .45ACP, certainly no reason to carry .380 unless you like the gun. Go to as many gun shops and do as much testing out 'in the hand' you can.

    .22LR is great for plinking and practice, and is not the worst caliber to carry (that would probably be .25), but you would be wise to choose something with more power. At present, for me, I like .45ACP and 9mm. May be .40S&W next week. But it won't be .25 or .22LR.

    Hope this helps!

  12. #32
    Polkster13's Avatar
    Polkster13 is offline Junior Member HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Lago Vista, TX
    Posts
    36
    If you think racking the slide has to do with strength, then please read and consider the following article...

    Rack the Slide | Cornered Cat

  13. #33
    momtotwo is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    jessyred;
    Some thoughtless people seem to believe that the correct response to your questions is: "Get a little gun for the little lady."
    As your own experience has shown, that's not the answer that you need.

    Small pistols are the very hardest to control, and to shoot well. They are not appropriate for beginners. Forget the CM9, the LC9, the LCP, and the P3AT.

    A beginner needs something that's simple to operate, that presents the very same set of circumstances for each and every shot, and that has enough size and weight to help "soak up" the recoil that every adequate self-defense cartridge delivers to the gun user.
    Once the beginner has learned safety techniques, sight-picture control, trigger control, and recoil control, and is able to place effective shots wherever they are required at all self-defense distances, then she might consider taking on a small-size pistol and learning how to control it. Until then, don't even consider it.

    Large, heavy pistols are easy to learn to shoot, but hard to conceal and carry. There are two ways to handle these facts:
    The first is to remember (I'm using someone else's words) that a defensive weapon should be comforting, not comfortable. Learn to carry and conceal the gun you've got and are already used to.
    The second is to wait until you have achieved proficiency with the larger gun, and then to switch to a second, smaller and lighter pistol.

    I totally agree with this.

    I am a woman. I have a LCP. I HATE IT. It is easy to CC but hard to shoot accurately.

    My sweet husband has a Glock 21. It is NOT easy to CC. It is very easy to shoot accurately.

    I also have a S&W .38 revolver. It is easy to shoot and very nice.

    I just picked up a Walther P88 Compact. It could be CC IWB and shoots very good.

    You have to decide what you want the weapon the most for. To CC or to use for home protection. If for home defense, get something a little bigger.

    My brother has a Springfield XD 9MM and it is very nice. Small, easy to CC, long enough barrel that it shoots very tight. You can get extended mags for at home. The grip is awesome. It has a loaded chamber indicator that you can feel so if you grabbed it in the dark, you know if it is loaded or not....needless to say, I like it. I didn't say no when my husband said he wanted one.

  14. #34
    hud35500's Avatar
    hud35500 is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    475
    I think we need a new forum called "listen to steve" !!

  15. #35
    momtotwo is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by hud35500 View Post
    I think we need a new forum called "listen to steve" !!

    Kind of like a Fireside Chat.....Yes...Yes....I like the idea!

  16. #36
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,384
    Quote Originally Posted by momtotwo View Post
    Kind of like a Fireside Chat.....Yes...Yes....I like the idea!
    OK: Fire lit. Easy chair at standby.
    Not permitted to smoke any more, so bubble pipe in hand and bubble liquid at the ready.
    Now, where did I put Fala and Elenore?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

lc9 pink for sale
,
lc9 vs barsa thunder
,

pink 22 pistol for sale

,
pink lc9 for sale
,
pink ruger lc9 for sale
,

pink ruger sr22 for sale

,

ruger lc9 for sale buds

,
ruger sr22 for sale
,
ruger sr22 for sale buds
,

ruger sr22 for sale buds gun shop

,

ruger sr22 for women

,

ruger sr22 pink for sale

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1