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  1. #1
    jhuneycutt is offline Junior Member
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    need info on how to find a good semi-auto .45 ACP

    Looking to get a semi-automatic .45 ACP,can anyone give me advice on how to find a good gun?

  2. #2
    loper is offline Junior Member
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    Read thru some of the threads here, and see what people are liking, or having problems with. Examine your budget, so you don't waste a lot of time gathering info about something you either can't afford, or just don't want to spend that much money on.
    Once you have your choices narrowed down, go to a gun store and handle each of your choices, and see what you like best. If the store has a range and will let you rent and fire the guns, by all means do so.
    Personally, I'm a 1911 guy, and I've had really good results with my Springfield.
    Hard to go wrong with Colt, Springfield, Kimber, or Rock Island. I don't have any personal experience with the Ruger, S&W, or new Remington 1911's.

  3. #3
    T-55A5 is offline Junior Member
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    If you are looking for a compact, a Glock 30 is a good gun

  4. #4
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    ponzer04 is offline Member
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    that would depend on your definition of good. my opinion goes to the 1911 (Colt or Sig Sauer).

  5. #5
    T-55A5 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponzer04 View Post
    that would depend on your definition of good. my opinion goes to the 1911 (Colt or Sig Sauer).
    Lite weight, accurate, low recoil (for a .45), 10rd mag

  6. #6
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    What is your intended use?
    What is your budget?

  7. #7
    usmcj's Avatar
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    Buying a Used Semi-Automatic Pistol

    by Patrick Sweeney

    Buying a used pistol for defense is not difficult. It just takes some persistence and a bit of work.

    There are two easy ways to stay safe: shop at a store you know with a good reputation, and buy a model you are familiar with. Buying from someone you met at a gun show can net you a deal. Or a bench queen. Also, if you have no familiarity with a model (Glocks, Sigs, 1911s) then you have to do your homework before buying one. Otherwise you risk finding later you’ve bought something that seemed like a deal but wasn’t.

    First, open it to make sure it is unloaded, then give it a look-over to see if it has been abused. I call this the “hammer marks and tire tracks” test. Literal hammer marks, file marks, etc. should be automatic cause for rejection. (Unless what you’re looking for is a gunsmithing project, in which case it may be perfect.) Are all the external parts on it factory, or have some been replaced with aftermarket ones? Open the action and lock it open. Is there daylight coming down the bore? (I kid you not, check for this.) Does the bore look clean and shiny? If not, ask for a brush or patched rod to clean it. If the seller assures you “It will clean up fine” ask again. If he has none, put it down and walk away.

    If you’ve gotten this far, ask if dry-firing is OK. If not, again, walk on. Any pistol you are considering for defense is one that will be up to the challenge of being dry-fired. If it isn’t you shouldn’t be looking at it. If the seller is against dry-firing, take a hike. If he truly believes it is bad, you won’t change his mind. If he’s trying to hide something, he’ll never agree that dry-firing that particular model is OK. If at this point you get the impression that I do a lot of walking at gun shops, gun shows, and dealer get-togethers, you’re right. Not only does it reduce the odds I’ll pick a lemon, it improves my negotiating position. As many gun shows now either insist or encourage the use of cable ties to keep actions closed, you’ll have to get the seller to cut the tie off. In gun shops, that won’t be a problem. If the seller tells you that you cannot cut the tie until after you buy, walk not just from the table but out of the show. Tell the ticket-taker on your way out why you’re leaving, and that you won’t be back.

    Try the trigger. Do the full drill: ease the slide forward, press the trigger until it drops the action, hold the trigger, cycle the slide, release the trigger to re-set, and dry-fire again. Do it at least a couple of times, and as many times as you need to, to satisfy yourself that the trigger is what it should be. And what would that be? That the trigger pull feels the same every time. That it is within the acceptable parameters for the action. That the re-set distance is the same each time.

    Now you’re to the sticking point. To tell more you have to take the slide off. Again, ask. To some dealers you have now become an official pain in the butt. Too bad. We assume that you’ve done your homework and know how. (You should have learned how before getting to this point.) What you’re looking for is evidence of gunsmithing (which may not be bad) and to get a sense of the round count. Look to the feed ramp area. Polished or not? If polished, have the angles been changed? On a 1911, you look to see that the top edge of the ramp in the frame hasn’t been rounded-over.

    On pistols with integral ramps, look for the same, and look to see if the bottom edge and sides have been ham-handedly polished. Look at the breechface. There should be burnishing, where the case heads have hammered the finish off in a circular pattern. The area around the firing pin hole should be smooth. If it is pitted in a circular pattern the diameter of a primer, the pistol has seen an impressive amount of ammo, or a lot of high-pressure (+P or +P+) or reloaded rounds. You’re seeing the results of gas leaks around the primers, eroding the breechface. If the seller asserts “It has had a couple of boxes of ammo through it” while you’re looking at erosion around the firing pin hole, you have a collision between observed reality and sales PR. If I’m feeling particularly cruel, I’ll ask the seller “How much did the guy before you shoot it?” Answer A) “I don’t know” has me bargaining for a high-mileage pistol. Answer B) “I’m the only owner” has me putting it down before walking off.

    Look at the trigger parts for evidence of disassembly, polishing, replacement parts, etc. If you see any, ask. As with the round count, the answers you get determine your continued participation.

    OK, what you’re looking at has all original parts, hasn’t been messed with, has a bright, clean bore, and is in the caliber and configuration you want. This is where shopping where you know works for you: Does the seller offer any kind of a warranty? Will they fix it there, or send it back to the factory? Is the agreement in writing? What shops can and cannot offer depends on the particular State you live in, and the manufacturer of the product in question. Some States require that any warranty be a full one, and thus no one offers you any help. They can’t. While all manufacturers will fix obvious defects in craftsmanship or materials, some will be more pleasant than others, and some will only do the absolute minimum. Does it come with the factory box? Paperwork? Lock?

    If you need a holster, magazines, etc. for your pistol, the time to get them is at this sale. You will be able to drive a better bargain now, rather than coming in a week later. “Hey, I got that Sig last week, and now I need some magazines. Can you knock a couple of bucks off the price?” You’re more likely to get those magazines at “a buck off” while buying the gun.

    Immediately go out and test-fire your pistol. (Not in the parking lot, but at the closest range, as soon as possible.) Again, a 30-day warranty means 30 days from the sale, not 30 days after you finally get around to shooting it and finding out that it bites your hands worse than a manic puppy. If something untoward happens, document it. Use your cell-phone camera if you have to, write detailed notes as well. Don’t diagnose, simply observe what happens, or doesn’t happen. Take it back right away.

    If everything works just fine, be sure to mention that. Building a relationship with an established gun shop can go a long way to eliminating the chances of buying a lemon.

    __________

    About the author:
    Patrick Sweeney is author of a number of authoritative gunsmithing books, published by Krause Books, and covering topics ranging from handguns to rifles and shotguns. For a list of titles by this author, check Coin, Paper Money, Knife, Old Car, Hunting, Antiques & Record Books - KrauseBooks.com

  8. #8
    jhuneycutt is offline Junior Member
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    so what would be too high of a price? i don't want to get ripped off....i'm going to mainly use it for hunting,and protection in the house and some shooting with the guys for fun.But i want it to be durable and, if taken care of right, last a long time.

  9. #9
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by T-55A5 View Post
    If you are looking for a compact, a Glock 30 is a good gun
    Agree... Glock 30sf, holds 10 which is amazing for a compact .45 seeing as most full size 1911's only hold 7 or 8... Dont get me started on how much price wise a glock 45 will save you versus an expensive 1911

  10. #10
    usmcj's Avatar
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    You can buy a new, entry level 1911 for around $400.

    ATI, and Rock Island Armory, are two that I have experience with. They have been reliable, and accurate, but again, they're not high-end 1911's.

    Glocks are good guns, but I find their ergonomics to be seriously poor.

    Get the platform that feel "right" in your hands.

  11. #11
    VAMarine's Avatar
    VAMarine is offline Administrator
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhuneycutt View Post
    so what would be too high of a price? i don't want to get ripped off....i'm going to mainly use it for hunting,and protection in the house and some shooting with the guys for fun.But i want it to be durable and, if taken care of right, last a long time.
    That really all depends on what exact gun you're buying.

    ".45" is kind of a broad range, you can spend anywhere from $150 to $3K.

    Typically you're average guns run around $400-$750, Glocks, Smith & Wesson M&Ps etc are good guns, Sigs and HKs are good guns but typically cost more etc.

    If taken care of right, any modern handgun of quality will outlast the owner.


    Typically any of the following is a safe bet:

    Beretta
    Glock
    HK
    Kahr
    Ruger
    Sig Sauer
    Smith & Wesson
    Springfield Armory


    Figure out what you want, then shop around for the best price.

  12. #12
    Cat's Avatar
    Cat
    Cat is offline Member
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  13. #13
    rgrundy's Avatar
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    The ones that have never failed me are the Springfield Armory Mil-Spec, SIG P220. They ran in any conditions. The Glock is probably fine too but I never had one of them in 45 ACP.

  14. #14
    jluker's Avatar
    jluker is offline Junior Member
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    any springfield xd or xdm 45cal. handguns are super solid and very reliable guns and would recomend them to any one

  15. #15
    jhuneycutt is offline Junior Member
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    I'm not looking for a compact,and price range budget for me would be $1k or less, so any ideas on good gun for that price? I'm liking the
    Springfield PB9151LP Mil-Spec, any say on that gun?

  16. #16
    rgrundy's Avatar
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    Springfield's Mil-Spec guns are winners for sure.

  17. #17
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    Don't limit yourself to a full size 1911. That is if you are set on a 1911. My first sig c-3 is a 4.25 and shoots real well. A new c-3 will set you back $750-800. I just got a second c-3 with the night sites and the crimson lazer grips for $849 free shipping. My 1911's fit me like a glove. my old glock 17 was to me like trying to hold a softball. listen to all USMCJ has to say. It can be really costly to get a gun that wouln't work for you. And don't skimp on quality, If you find a gun that fits you and inspires you and can't afford it right now find a place that will do layaway (buds gun shop ect) Also buy new as most companys only will fix the gun if you are the first owner, That is if you have a problem. So saving $100 could cost you big time down the road. And going with a company that gives a lifetime service that follows the gun(yall know who) will leave you scraching your head as to how could have I fell into this trap! Good luck!

  18. #18
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    recoilguy is offline Senior Member
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    2 very nice guns not yet mentioned but worth a look in my humble opinion

    EAA Witness match .45
    CZ 97

    Look at them before you decide,

    RCG

  19. #19
    Raymond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhuneycutt View Post
    Looking to get a semi-automatic .45 ACP,can anyone give me advice on how to find a good gun?

    First you have to define what a "good gun" is for you. Decide what you want to do with this gun (e.g. as a ccw weapon, target or range gun, or price limit?). Narrow that down and go from there. I personally have two Kimber 1911's (Covert and Pro Carry II) and love both of them. I have never had a problem with either of them

  20. #20
    MoMan's Avatar
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    I'm a fan of Kimbers, probably because I shot multiple models of my friends, then purchased a SS Targe II. I have had absolutely not problems with this pistol. I actually have had no problems with any of my pistols, probably because I keep them clean.
    Like someone else said, if you buy a modern day pistol and take care of it, it should outlive you!
    Just my $.02

    MO

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