Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    guy48065 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6

    Gunbelt cartridge corrosion

    Hey all. I just joined up so I may as well come out of the gate asking a question. I have a couple gunbelts hanging on the wall as a sort-of decoration and the cartridges in the loops are corroding fast. Seems to me thay won't be much good pretty soon. How is this prevented? Somehow I just can't imagine oldtime cowboys polishing their cartridges every couple weeks

  2. Ads
  3. #2
    45Sidekick's Avatar
    45Sidekick is offline Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    308
    thats exactly what youd need to do in a cartridge belt, leather absorbs, attracts, and holds moisture. ammo should be kept in a nice cool dry place, the less humid, the less chance of corrosion.

  4. #3
    VAMarine's Avatar
    VAMarine is online now Administrator
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,216
    Cowboys didn't have gun belts hanging on the wall for decoration. Going back a few years to when Dad carried a .45LC as a duty gun, he would unload the belt and wipe down the extra cartridges and not leave them stowed as such.

    If you're looking for dramatic effect, and don't plan on firing the rounds, clean them up and apply a clear coat of lacquer or something.

  5. #4
    TedDeBearFrmHell's Avatar
    TedDeBearFrmHell is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,859
    Quote Originally Posted by VAMarine View Post
    If you're looking for dramatic effect, and don't plan on firing the rounds, clean them up and apply a clear coat of lacquer or something.
    i wouldnt recommend lacquering live rounds, but have some bullets seated into empty, spent casings.... then lacquer them.....

    if you lacquer live rounds then accidentally shoot them, you may, depending on the lacquer, fuse the brass to the cylinder wall.

  6. #5
    45Sidekick's Avatar
    45Sidekick is offline Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    308
    very good point and we dont want that, do we?

  7. #6
    TedDeBearFrmHell's Avatar
    TedDeBearFrmHell is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,859
    Quote Originally Posted by 45Sidekick View Post
    very good point and we dont want that, do we?
    no, this would be a bad thing in my opinion....

  8. #7
    45Sidekick's Avatar
    45Sidekick is offline Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    308
    Quote Originally Posted by TedDeBearFrmHell View Post
    this would be a bad thing in my opinion....
    yeah it might not turn out so well for him

  9. #8
    guy48065 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6
    Hmmm maybe I need to find some nickle cases...

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Chino Valley, AZ
    Posts
    510
    Quote Originally Posted by guy48065 View Post
    Hmmm maybe I need to find some nickle cases...
    I was going to suggest nickel, but you beat me to it. See, you had the solution all along.
    For what it's worth, my "nickel" cases aren't REALLY all nickel. Just plain 'ol brass that has been nickle PLATED. Maybe some other folks use all nickel ?
    And, nickel isn't really impervious to corrosion.
    "Because of nickel's slow rate of oxidation at room temperature, it is considered corrosion-resistant. Historically this has led to its use for plating metals such as iron and brass."

    Therefore, if you are going keep those leather belt occupants looking spiffy and shiny for a long time frame,
    I'd suggest checking the Periodic Table of Elements. There, I see quite a few more "almost truly inert" elements.
    Periodic table - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Silver or gold cartridge cases are probably the most common of those which will also prevent "corrosion", but are a tad bit more expensive than nickel.
    Contary to common opinion, the more expensive silver cartridge cases do not "help" with vampires. The BULLET has to be silver. The SD anti-vampire "loads" have an indented cross.
    In favor of the gold cases, I'd just make the whole thing a solid gold cartridge/bullet. A couple of leather belts full would be a wonderful hedge against runaway inflation.

    Best of all, however, is the illusive unobtainum.
    Since it is "faster than a speeding bullet", it can outrun corrosion.
    But, its price is way out of the league of us mere mortals in "the 99%". :

  11. #10
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    Ammunition corroding from being kept in leather, supports the reasoning that it's not wise to store guns in leather holsters/scabbards for long periods of time either.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    USS Constitution
    Posts
    379
    Quote Originally Posted by usmcj View Post
    Ammunition corroding from being kept in leather, supports the reasoning that it's not wise to store guns in leather holsters/scabbards for long periods of time either.
    lol, a worthy inference

  13. #12
    guy48065 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6
    ON the other hand--what would eventually happen if I did nothing? Could the green cartridges stain the belt? Stick to it? Something worse?

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    USS Constitution
    Posts
    379
    the green will definitely affect the leather, they may very will stick, at least more so than the positive retention you already experience. In all honesty hanging useful equipment up for decoration is silly. You should load up and down load the gun belt as you need it, leaving it loaded is just lazy, and using for decoration, well the question comes to mind who are you trying to impress?

    Theres lot's of great ways to "waste" ammo and letting it corrode in a gun belt is not one of them. if you want a proper gun memorabilia decoration buy one of the war era rifles that are always selling in the magazines, remove the firing pin and hang it above your mantel, or in your hallway, whatever. cheap decoy that they can't use against you,

  15. #14
    guy48065 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6
    Proper decoration? You'd rather I hide my hats &gun belts but why not display them. They look good and compliment the Kentucky rifle I already have on the wall

  16. #15
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    4,920
    The green stuff is called verdigris. It's caused by a chemical reaction between cartridge brass and leather-tanning residuals.

    The verdigris represents some portion of the metallic makeup of the brass. That means that your brass cartridges are being "eaten" by leather-tanning chemicals. Were you to examine the brass, once it had been cleaned of all verdigris, under a microscope, you would see that the fabric of the brass itself had been changed and had become somewhat porous.

    I believe that, were you to leave the brass to collect yet more verdigris, the metal would become brittle and crack, and maybe even disintegrate eventually.

    (I know this because I have several belts I made, back when I was in the business, with brass snaps and other fittings. The brass that has become verdigris-infected now breaks easily.)

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

brass ammo corrosion in leather belts
,

bullet corrosion how to break in leather holster

,

bullets stored in leather

,
can you leave bullets in a ammo belt
,

cartridges turn green in gun belt

,
green stain on leather holster
,
how can i keep cartridges from turning green from my cartridge loops
,
how do you keep brass bullets from corroding in leather holder
,
prevent brass corrosion from leather
,

stain on brass casing from holster

,
what causes cartridges to corrode
,
why does leather turn my ammo green
Click on a term to search for related topics.