Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27

Thread: Ear Protection

  1. #1
    Z1N1's Avatar
    Z1N1 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    18

    Ear Protection

    I realize this is a n00b question, but, since I'm a n00b I feel no shame.

    For a Glock 19, would ear plugs suffice for ear protection, or would ear muffs be recommended?

    Most shooting will be outdoors.


    Thanks!

  2. Ads
  3. #2
    denner's Avatar
    denner is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,821
    Either one will work fine. I even tear off and roll up tissue or a napkin and place it in my ears in a pinch.

  4. #3
    Snarfblat is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2
    Ear plugs work but your ears transmit sound to your ear drums. Thus, ear muffs are better suited to protecting your entire ear and minimizing the transmission of vibration to your ear drum. Also, an open mouth will generally transmit more sound to your auditory system so keep your mouth shut when you're at the range. I use ear plugs and ear muffs to gain the maximum use out of these sound control devices.

  5. #4
    bruce333's Avatar
    bruce333 is offline HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wilson's Mills, NC
    Posts
    2,495
    I always use plugs and muffs (electronic). The plugs for primary protection and the electronic muffs to prevent bone conduction of the sound and to enable me to still hear range commands clearly. Hearing damage is one of those things that creeps up on you. It also adds up, that is, a little damage once in a while adds up to a lot of damage over time. Once you lose hearing you don't ever get it back.
    Bruce, Life Member: NRA, NCRPA, GRNC, GOA

    Naval Air Museum Barbers Point

    "I personally think we developed language because of our deep inner need to complain."--Jane Wagner
    "The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom."
    -Isaac Asimov

  6. #5
    Packard is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Posts
    1,017
    If I were a hunter I would definitely apply for a permit for a sound suppressor. The ability to hear noises while being safe from the rifle blast would be a huge advantage. The same would apply for military service in my opinion.

    But for practicing marksmanship I would always use hearing protection (not "ear" protection).

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    160
    I wear earmuffs whether indoor or outdoor shooting. I got curious a few weeks back at an outdoor range and lifted my right earmuff slightly while my friend was firing my M&P 9mm 6' away. Big mistake, its loud as f--k! He was wearing cheap earplugs and his ears were ringing for days after. He will be getting earmuffs before the next trip. Can't really overdo it I guess.

  8. #7
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    Hearing loss is cumulative. By that I mean that one single exposure to gunfire, need not result in deafness. Multiple exposures add up to a given degree of hearing loss, depending on how many exposures, and at what level. I have tinnitus and hearing loss from the military, but there are other sources of trauma to your hearing. Some folks are predisposed to hearing loss due to heredity, but leaf blowers, fireworks, rock concerts, some motorcycle exhaust,and other noise contributes to the risk as well.

    I prefer muffs to plugs, because muffs provide a bit of protection to the mastiod process, behind the ear. That bone can transmit sound to the ear. Modern electronic muffs can be an aid in hunting by amplifying sounds, yet preventing damage to your ears by clamping down on noise that rises above around 80db.

    In any case, protect your hearing... but it's up to the individual.... as is most everything shooting related.

    Additional info...

    Hearing and Chronic Ear Disorders-Hearing Loss and Shooting Sports- Ears of Texas

  9. #8
    KoneKiller is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Washougal, Wa
    Posts
    13
    I just do a good set of plugs. I used to help tune T/A funny cars, and all most of us ever wore was just plugs.
    I am sure part of the reason I am a bit hard of hearing is that, but I think it is bad ear design. If I move them a bit, things come in clear. Kinda like rabbit ears on black n white tv's....

  10. #9
    cclaxton's Avatar
    cclaxton is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    402
    Ear loss can be permanent, so I wouldnt mess around here. Same with eye protection.
    I went to the doctor to have something removed from my ear canal and had my hearing checked by an ear doctor....turns out I have some hearing loss at higher frequencies...the first to go usually. It is 40dB lss at 5KHz.

    I recommend getting your hearing checked as a good reference and always use good hearing protection and get it checked every year if you shoot frequently. I had the doctor make plugs molded to my ears, and on top of that I use 29NRR muffs. I shoot at an indoor range and they shoot high powered rifles there and I am sure they are running over 120dB, and that will damage your ears in only 15 seconds of exposure.

    Damaged hearing is related to loudness AND the amount of time you are exposed. Also, your age can be a factor.

    If you shoot outdoors most of the time you could get by with just muffs or plugs, but I would always double-up for indoor ranges, especially if they shoot shotguns or rifles there.

    Good plugs and muffs are inexpensive compared to permanent hearing loss....this is a no-brainer.

  11. #10
    Z1N1's Avatar
    Z1N1 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    18
    Excellent responses. The overwhelming consensus is, Go with a headset. I also liked the suggestion to wear both earplugs and earmuffs.

    Thanks everyone!

  12. #11
    Packard is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Posts
    1,017
    Quote Originally Posted by Z1N1 View Post
    Excellent responses. The overwhelming consensus is, Go with a headset. I also liked the suggestion to wear both earplugs and earmuffs.

    Thanks everyone!
    Ear plugs and earmuffs will certainly make things quieter but I don't believe that they will offer up any additional hearing protection. You need only bring the decibel level beneath the threshold level that causes damage to the hearing. Either of these will work fine for that purpose.

    Personally I wear earmuffs as long as the weather is cool. When it gets warm I wear the ear plugs which allow my ears to "breath".

    The ear plugs don't seem as sanitary and get icky looking even if you wipe them down after using.

    But unless you want it really, really quiet you can pick one or the other. Most will allow you to hear distinct conversations; I'm not sure if you can do that with both on.

  13. #12
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    ANYTHING that impedes the transmission of sound to your ear drums will offer more protection than less of an impediment.

    Layering your clothing in winter works on a similar principle.

  14. #13
    Packard is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Posts
    1,017
    Quote Originally Posted by usmcj View Post
    ANYTHING that impedes the transmission of sound to your ear drums will offer more protection than less of an impediment.

    Layering your clothing in winter works on a similar principle.
    This is a handgun forum so I was only considering handgun noise levels. Certainly if I were shooting next to a .50 BMG I might consider layering too. But as long as you get the noise level below the threshold of hearing damage there is no real reason (from a safety point of view) to go much further. Most quality ear muffs and ear plugs will get below that threshold on their own.

    I understand your layering analogy, but I would not wear my field jacket with its liner buttoned in and a sweater in 30 degree weather. Certainly it would make me warmer--to the point that I would sweat, and then I would open the jacket and the wet clothes would make me chill. I dress for the weather.

    With the hearing protection I would add "layers" as the noise level increased. But there is a trade off. I can have a conversation at the range with my muffs on; I can do the same with ear plugs too. I doubt that I could do so with both in place.

    So I agree with you that when it is appropriate due to higher than ordinary noise levels, go ahead and wear layers of hearing protection.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Northern UT
    Posts
    457
    I use electronic muff's most of the time. 95% of the time this is enough where I shoot. Don't be afraid to double up with plugs as well. Protecting your hearing is something you will never regret. Bonus: Good hearing protection helps to filter out distractions and aids in the quality of your range time.

  16. #15
    berettatoter's Avatar
    berettatoter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,194
    Quote Originally Posted by Z1N1 View Post
    I realize this is a n00b question, but, since I'm a n00b I feel no shame.

    For a Glock 19, would ear plugs suffice for ear protection, or would ear muffs be recommended?

    Most shooting will be outdoors.


    Thanks!
    Well, the next time you go shooting, try it without hearing protection. After about a day or so, when your ears stop ringing, you will see the only people who don't need hearing protection while shooting are the deaf.

  17. #16
    Z1N1's Avatar
    Z1N1 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by berettatoter View Post
    Well, the next time you go shooting, try it without hearing protection. After about a day or so, when your ears stop ringing, you will see the only people who don't need hearing protection while shooting are the deaf.
    Didn't answer my question, but thanks anyway.

  18. #17
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    Quote Originally Posted by berettatoter View Post
    Well, the next time you go shooting, don't try it without hearing protection, or After about a day or so, when your ears stop ringing, you will see the only people who don't need hearing protection while shooting are the deaf.
    ...fixed it for you.... There's no reason at all to ever suggest that someone go shooting without hearing protection. All due respect.

  19. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Sarasota Fla / Huntersville N.C.
    Posts
    445
    Keep in mind it's not your gun you're protecting your ears from.

    It's the person next to you with the .44 mag and the .500 he shoots for fun as fast as he can pull the trigger

    AFS

  20. #19
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    Quote Originally Posted by AirForceShooter View Post
    Keep in mind it's not your gun you're protecting your ears from.

    It's the person next to you with the .44 mag and the .500 he shoots for fun as fast as he can pull the trigger

    AFS
    Unless you happen to be the only one at the range.

  21. #20
    Z1N1's Avatar
    Z1N1 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by AirForceShooter View Post
    Keep in mind it's not your gun you're protecting your ears from.

    It's the person next to you with the .44 mag and the .500 he shoots for fun as fast as he can pull the trigger

    AFS
    True. Mostly it's just going to be me and a buddy of mine out on his property, but eventually I would like to find an indoor range for year 'round practice.

  22. #21
    buck-boost's Avatar
    buck-boost is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    38
    Most shooters develop habits early. Good and bad. Wear good muffs like pro ears or peltors. Double up if inside. The biggest reason I have seen flinch develop with new shooters is not from recoil but from the noise. Loud noises have bad psychological effects when dealing with shooters.

    Hell, sometimes I jump in my own lane at an indoor range when when 3 stalls over some unleashes a 24gr load of 296 in a .44.

  23. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    USS Constitution
    Posts
    379
    US Navy Policy:

    Indoor range, double hearing protection ie plugs and muffs. gunshots, if you haven't noticed, are a lot louder indoors than out..

    Outdoor range, single hearing protection (plugs or muffs, shooters preference) required, double hearing still recommended. Since hearing loss counts as a disability and they end up paying for that type of thing once a body accumulates enough disability, I figure they probably put in quite a lot of study into it and I'm fine with abiding by their policy.

  24. #23
    berettatoter's Avatar
    berettatoter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,194
    Quote Originally Posted by Z1N1 View Post
    Didn't answer my question, but thanks anyway.
    Not trying to be a tough guy, but hearing protection is a must. I remember, while in the Marines, there were times when you did not have the time(or did not want to have plugs in for other reasons) to put your "ears" on. You get a few rifles going off around you for a while, including yours, then years later you find out that is not a good thing to have happen. My ears ring most of the time and I know between the sound of gunfire and helicopters(their loud), my hearing took a beating.

  25. #24
    T-55A5 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    66
    If the range has the hand guns on one side and the rifles on the other side then muffs will work....if mixed then use plugs and muffs

    When I fired my rifles I was around other high powered rifles and I used plugs and muffs....when I went over to the hundgun range I only needed the muffs

    It seems that a .500 S&W is not as bad as a 7.62x54r, 8mm or a 223 going off and just the muffs were needed

  26. #25
    chessail77's Avatar
    chessail77 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    White Mtns. in AZ
    Posts
    1,349
    If you plan to become an avid shooter then electronic muffs are the best way to go....training courses you can hear instructions and range commands while still protecting your valuable hearing long term...JJ

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

can't shoot glock without ear protectoin
,
decibel level of glock 19
,

does hearing come back after gun

,

glock 19 decibel level

,

glock 19 decibels

,

glock db rating

,
how many db needed for ear protection when shooting gun
,
how many decibals is a glock 19
,

how many decibels of protection should i have to shoot a glock 19

,
how much ear protection is needed for a 9mm glock
,
my ears are ringing after shooting
,

noise frequency of glock 19

Click on a term to search for related topics.