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  1. #21
    chessail77's Avatar
    chessail77 is offline Senior Member
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    Your first choice of the M&Pc 9mm was a good one and it can be ordered with a safety as well. S&W also has one of the best warranties in the industry with great customer service.

  2. #22
    buckler's Avatar
    buckler is offline Banned
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    male or female, first guns should be .22's. I suggest that you get a used one, from a shop or private seller who will let you test fire it a lot, to establish that it works well. then if you want to or need to sell it, to get money for your centerfire ccw gun, you will get almost as much as you paid. Understand? 22's are 5c per shot, or so, centerfires are 25c per shot. to really have a basis for confidence in your ability with your pistol, you need to fire several thousand rounds, in a very few months, preferably with a decent coach watching/guiding you thru a lot of it. saving $200 per thousand rds quicklly pays for any "loss" you take upon sellinig the .22. I suggest that you keep it, if that is at all possible for you, financially. 22's are great fun, and practice with the .22 is preferable to non-practice with the centerfire ammo that you can't afford, you know.

  3. #23
    buckler's Avatar
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    try to get a .22 that is as much as possible alike the centerfire that you want. In other words, don't get a .22 revolver if you plan to use a centerfire autoloader as your carry pc. dont get a .22 with a thumb safety if your centerfire does not have one. Dont teach yourself to so something with the .22 that you will not be doing with the centerfire. It makes no sense to have to "unlearn" something that you should never have learned in the first place.

  4. #24
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    I differ. My recommendation is a .357 with a 4" barrel. Start out with light target loads. The recoil from a light target load from a mid-frame .357 is not substantial (but more than a .22).

    I think the battery of arms on a revolver is simpler and safer for a novice and the weapon can be incrementally increased with heavier loads. Ultimately it makes a super home defense weapon so that it never needs to be disposed of.

    And of course a good revolver is the most reliable handgun you can get.

  5. #25
    hud35500's Avatar
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    If you have no handgun experience, I would agree with Packard on a revolver. Simple and foolproof. Semi-autos are a whole different world and require much more familiarization. Kind of like the difference between an manual trans/ automatic trans. No reason not to buy an auto, but practice and training are essential before you carry one. I don't subscribe to the theory that you must start with a .22 and work you way up. It's good for kids, but most adults should be able to start with a 9mm/.38 spl. I carry a Sig P220 .45, but I have a .22 kit for it as well. It's fun to shoot and the gun is the same physically. Good for learning the trigger.

  6. #26
    buckler's Avatar
    buckler is offline Banned
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    maybe, but make it a $200, used, 4" Taurus .22lr, cause .38 wadcutter ammo is 20c a shot, dudes. getting in enough practice to be any good with a .357 is going to cost her and arm and a leg. First .38 wc's, then plus P 38's, then 357's, the latter at 40c a shot, thousands of rds at each step? Sheesh, she better have 1000's of $ ready to devote to it, your way.

  7. #27
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Do you think .22s really gives you much practice that will relate to shooting service caliber guns? I mean, maybe. I have not shot a .22 in a long time. I do have an Olympic-style pellet gun and it is excellent for training you to hold a steady sight picture, but with a 1 to 1-1/2 pound trigger it does not relate well for trigger control.

    I have a cheap pellet gun (CO2) that is a knock off of a Beretta, and it has a long, long, trigger pull and it is very, very heavy. If you can control that trigger you can control the trigger on any gun ever made. So for very cheap ammo you can conquer two aspects of accurate shooting: trigger control, and sight picture.

    But this ignores recoil. And that is my issue with .22s. They make noise, but the recoil is almost non-existent.

  8. #28
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    Need to strike a balance. .22's are great, but you must get used to the recoil of whatever you carry. Fact is that shooting is not a cheap passtime. I could drink Bud or Coors and save money too, but my palate craves more expensive(and tastier) brews. So grin and bear it !

  9. #29
    ozzy's Avatar
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    I was shooting .45 and .44 Mag when I was a little kid 9-10, my older cousins thought it was funny to watch me handle large pistols at that age. To there surprise I shot them very well. I also was shooting a lot of .38 my pops pistol. What I'm getting at is a women is not limited to small calibers just because. By the way I still shoot a lot of .22 to this day up to 500 rounds a month.

  10. #30
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    My wife loves shooting the Ruger .44 mag blackhawk. I agree that women can handle it.

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