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  1. #1
    MAG13 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    2

    Opinion on Ruger LCR series?

    Hey guys,

    I've been thinking about purchasing a Ruger LCR. However, I'm not real knowledgable about them. I was looking at a few the other day and absolutely love how light they are, but is there a drawback to this advantage? Another thing is im not sure if I want to get a .357 or .38 special. Does one LCR have an advantage over the other? If there is any more information, experiences, or observations it would be much appreciated. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Packard is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Posts
    1,017
    The advantages of the resin frames are: lower production costs, and light weight.

    S & W produces an aluminum framed .38 in the same weight range and it costs a good bit more. Of course S & W guaranties the frame for life; I'm not sure about the Ruger guaranty.

    The .357 Ruger has a steel frame and is heavier (but still cost-effective and fairly light).

    S & W makes a .357 scandium framed snubbie but it is very expensive (about $1,100.00 list; locally just under $900.00 here; and at Bud's guns just over $700.00) but very light (under 11-1/2 ounces).

    I read a test (torture test) and the Ruger did relatively well, but the author recommended against a steady diet of +P rounds.

    Of course resin framed revolvers are fairly new and they don't have the favorable history (yet) that resin framed pistols have. So if you are of a conservative nature you might want to think twice. But overall the write-ups I've read say the Ruger is an excellent gun and the resin frame seems to absorb some fo the recoil making it easier to shoot.

    And Ruger (as a corporation) has always seemed to be conscientious about standing behind their products.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Chino Valley, AZ
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by MAG13 View Post
    . . . If there is any more information, experiences, or observations it would be much appreciated. . .
    I agree with most of the points Packard has made.

    I bought an S&W Centennial Airweight snubby a while back. That is the humpback "hidden hammer" model with aluminum frame.
    For $400. Added Crimson Trace laser grips for about $210.

    The same day I bought mine, a lady friend bought her Ruger LCR. So, I have fired both quite often, including +P.
    My Smith is fine, but if I had it to do over, I'd go with the LCR. She paid $400. Maybe a bit cheaper now ?

    Somewhere in the archives are more info I posted back when comparing range experience with these two. I like the LCR trigger better.
    I highly recommend factory lasers on snubbies. You can get 'em on the LCR, and the new S&W "plastic frame" Bodyguard revolver.

    Both companies make .357 versions of these guns. To me that is MEAN and TOTAL overkill in a 15 oz. revolver.

    And, the absolute worst carry revolver is the S&W Scandium snubby in .357 Magnum.
    Let's pay three times the price, lighten it as much as possible, and load it with mule-kicking, muzzle-blasting Magnum ammo.

    Jeez, for anyone into heavy-duty masochism it would make sense.

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