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  1. #1
    smlranger is offline Junior Member
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    New holster question

    I took advantage of the new owner registration 20% discount at Ruger and got their Mitch Rosen Express holster for my new SR9c. Put the pistol in the holster and needed a come along to get the gun out. I expected it to be stiff at first but, man, this holster grips the pistol beyond expectation.

    So, are there tricks (other than gun in/out a blue million times to loosen it up) to soften the holster a bit? It is a nice looking holster but the leather is board stiff. I have a Bianchi for my Bersa that worked like a charm right out of the box.

  2. #2
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Neats foot oil will soften leather, but be careful that you don't over-do it and make the holster all floppy.

    Is there a retention adjustment screw?

    (Best bet: Write to Mitch Rosen and ask his advice--and let us know what he says.)

  3. #3
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    NEVER oil a molded holster. NEVER! That's how you ruin it.

    A well-made, brand-new leather holster should be tight. The draw should be difficult. You have to break it in.

    The best way to break a holster in, is to make lots and lots of practice draws from it.
    That way, you not only break the holster in, but also you get lots of useful practice at the same time.

    If it should happen that, after making at least 100 practice draws, the holster is still too tight, you might consider adding a little KG-9 Teflon-carrying, holster-slicking preparation to its inside surfaces.
    Be careful, though. A little goes a long, long way. The holster could become too slick, and might not properly retain your pistol.

    Otherwise, add nothing to the inside of your holster.
    Brush dirt out and off with an old, used, dry toothbrush.
    Once in a while, as the leather becomes scuffed, you can polish its exterior (only) with a little neutral (colorless) Kiwi shoe polish (hard wax, in a can). Do not use any liquid: no oil, no liquid shoe polish, no "shoe cream," no Lexol, no saddlesoap.

  4. #4
    samurai is offline Junior Member
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    Wrap you gun in a couple layers of plastic shrink wrap ( or plastic bag) and stick it in the holster for a couple of days. It should stretch out.

  5. #5
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by samurai View Post
    Wrap you gun in a couple layers of plastic shrink wrap ( or plastic bag) and stick it in the holster for a couple of days. It should stretch out.
    That's not really a good thing to do. It'll chance stretching the holster too much, which is irrevocable.
    That's another of those last-resort remedies.

    If you do it, start with one layer of Saran Wrap. It's thin enough to not do too much damage.
    If that doesn't work, try two layers.
    At last resort, try a plastic storage bag.

    But practice is much, much better.
    After all, you need to practice anyway.

  6. #6
    elwopo is offline Junior Member
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    Amazing!

    Finding an answer to this question is why I joined this forum only minutes ago!

    I just got my Blackhawk speed classic for the S&W 638. Absolutely beyond belief how much force it takes to remove it.
    I'll try the multiple draw technique....but it's a real bear to deal with initially.
    "Speed" classic......LMAO! Maybe if you use both hands and tighten your belt so much that you can't breathe.

  7. #7
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    With a really well-made holster, you need a really stiff, well-made belt.
    If the belt is properly stiff, it needn't be tight.

    A good belt should be thick, stiff, and maybe even with an extra stiffening interlining.
    See the people who made your holster, or Galco, or The Beltman for the proper belt.

  8. #8
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by elwopo View Post
    Finding an answer to this question is why I joined this forum only minutes ago!

    I just got my Blackhawk speed classic for the S&W 638. Absolutely beyond belief how much force it takes to remove it.
    I'll try the multiple draw technique....but it's a real bear to deal with initially.
    "Speed" classic......LMAO! Maybe if you use both hands and tighten your belt so much that you can't breathe.
    Always seek information from the best single source. In this case it would be the manufacturer. Write to their customer service and ask them what they suggest.

    The risk is that there are members here who will spout definitive information in contradiction of other members and they may or may not be correct. Just because someone shouts, "Don't do that, do this!" in these forums does not necessarily make that information correct.

    So I will repeat: Always seek information from the single best source; in this case that would be the manufacturer.


    For your convenience: holster@mitchrosen.com

  9. #9
    recoilguy's Avatar
    recoilguy is offline Senior Member
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    Although some guys are the best and final answer no matter what the manufacture says.
    \
    RCG

  10. #10
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Um, Packard, one can only ask: "How many holsters have you made? How much leatherwork have you done?"

    I made my living doing high-quality leatherwork for an awfully long time. It was my own business, too.
    I've made many holsters, although that was not the main focus of my work.

    Now, how 'bout you?

  11. #11
    elwopo is offline Junior Member
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    There's points to be made on both sides

    As with most things in life....there are few definites.

    Contacting the manufacturer is a good idea, but you never know who might be the one to field the response. They are an employee and may or may not have knowledge and experience.

    On the other hand, there is a lot to be gained from talking to someone who has done something for a long time......but that's no guarantee they've been doing it RIGHT for a long time.

    So it's rarely easy....and it takes reason to sort out all the responses.

    I appreciate what I've gotten so far....and will keep looking, working the advice that makes sense, and hoping for a solution. Because at the end of the day I don't care who makes a holster....I just know that if it won't draw without ridiculous force and the scene that causes......it's of no use.

  12. #12
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Rosen knows he makes tight holsters. He markets a slip material to apply to the leather until the holster loosens up. It is $8.00 + $2.00 shipping on my last check. That is probably going to be Rosen's recommendation.

  13. #13
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    About using oil to loosen-up a stiff, tight holster...

    The following, although probably not attributable to the use of neatsfoot oil, saddlesoap, or Lexol, points up why one must never use any kind of softening agent on a decent, wet-molded, leather holster.
    Soft is not good.
    Not even a wee, tiny bit soft.

    Click on: SAFETY WARNING! Worn Leather Holsters Can Cause Accidental Discharges!

  14. #14
    Bisley's Avatar
    Bisley is online now Senior Member
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    I've made quite a few 'utilitarian' holsters, from both leather and kydex, or both together, and although I don't claim 'artist' or even 'craftsman' status, they have all functioned eventually, with continuous tweaking until they did. I'm not terribly anal about such things - they just have to function well enough to suit my purpose.

    For an IWB holster, which is what I have mostly made, a tight fit is less critical (for me) because I go for a deep concealment type (rather than a fast draw design)...meaning that most of the gun is down inside my pants and can be tightened by taking in another notch on the heavy leather belt that I wear.

    So, I mold the leather by wrapping the gun in plastic wrap, soaking the leather with water, and pressing it around the outline of the gun and into the major depressions, like the trigger guard. I clamp it because the leather shrinks a little as it dries, making a tight fit. Most times, the gun fits just right, once the plastic wrap is removed.

    Whether you would want to try this on a quality store-bought holster, I don't know, but it ain't rocket science, and like I said, if it's too loose, tighten your belt a notch and don't do cartwheels while wearing your gun.

  15. #15
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Leather Lightning: http://www.mitchrosen.com/new_produc..._products.html

    Click "Product line" then "Misc." and scroll down to "leather lightning"

    Leather Lightning™ is applied to the inside of a holster to produce a very slick draw. Even the most tightly boned holsters, a hallmark of my gunleather, will now be able to be effortlessly broken in as you carry your handgun...without compromising a fast, smooth presentation. Leather Lightning is a surface treatment for leather and will therefore not be absorbed by the leather, nor harm the finish of your firearm. This will not alter the original fit. Mitch Rosen is the sole distributor of Leather Lightning. Leather Lightning is a trademark of Phoenix Armory, Inc.


  16. #16
    SMann is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Packard View Post
    Leather Lightning is a surface treatment for leather and will therefore not be absorbed by the leather

    This quote confirms the accuracy of everything Steve already said.

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