Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    TodQ is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2

    1931 Enfield No 2 Mk 1

    I've recently taken ownership of an Enfield No 2 Mk 1 revolver that had been my father's. I'm looking forward to getting it to a range, but before I can do that, I have to replace a missing screw. And finding a replacement is proving to be rather difficult.

    The screw that is missing is one of the cam screws (not the cam lever screw). Numrich seems to be the only place online that calls out that specific screw, and they're sold out.

    Does anyone know if there is an alternative (for example, could I use Webley parts)? Or do I pull the cam screw that remains and measure it for diameter, thread pitch etc....?

  2. #2
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,466
    That screw probably is threaded to Whitworth specifications, a system peculiar to Great Britain before they converted to the Metric System.
    It is quite unlikely that you would find a Whitworth screw here in the US, or even Whitworth taps and dies. You might try a gunsmith or parts house in Britain, if there are any left. Ask Google for leads, and you might get lucky.

    One of the "features" of the Whitworth System is that the form of a Whitworth screw's threads does not resist vibration well, and it tends to come undone.
    Back in the day, those of us involved with sports cars said that, "if you own a British car, you should purchase the accessory lock-washer kit," "you should go around the car on a weekly basis, tightening up all those Whitworth screws," and "every part that fell off onto the street was built with impeccable British engineering."

    I once owned an Enfield like yours. It was a nice, comfortable pistol which fired a cartridge a little less powerful than what I felt to be useful. There was a very cleverly designed conversion kit which temporarily made the revolver into a .22 LR rimfire by replacing its cylinder and lining its barrel. The conversion took all of five minutes to install or remove, and it was acceptably accurate even though the fired bullet transitioned from cylinder to barrel liner at an angle (to accommodate the rimfire cartridge to the centerfire hammer).

  3. #3
    TodQ is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2
    Thanks for the info. I've located a company in England that sells Whitworth fasteners, and I may throw a few dollars their way. It won't be OEM, but it'll be more than I've got now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    That screw probably is threaded to Whitworth specifications, a system peculiar to Great Britain before they converted to the Metric System.
    It is quite unlikely that you would find a Whitworth screw here in the US, or even Whitworth taps and dies. You might try a gunsmith or parts house in Britain, if there are any left. Ask Google for leads, and you might get lucky.

    One of the "features" of the Whitworth System is that the form of a Whitworth screw's threads does not resist vibration well, and it tends to come undone.
    Back in the day, those of us involved with sports cars said that, "if you own a British car, you should purchase the accessory lock-washer kit," "you should go around the car on a weekly basis, tightening up all those Whitworth screws," and "every part that fell off onto the street was built with impeccable British engineering."

    I once owned an Enfield like yours. It was a nice, comfortable pistol which fired a cartridge a little less powerful than what I felt to be useful. There was a very cleverly designed conversion kit which temporarily made the revolver into a .22 LR rimfire by replacing its cylinder and lining its barrel. The conversion took all of five minutes to install or remove, and it was acceptably accurate even though the fired bullet transitioned from cylinder to barrel liner at an angle (to accommodate the rimfire cartridge to the centerfire hammer).

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

1931 enfield revolver
,
enfield no 2 mk i revolver parts
,
enfield no.2 mk1
,
enfield no.2 mk1 disassembly
,
enfield no2 mk1 cylinder cam screw
,

enfield no2 mk1 parts

,
enfield no2 revolver parts
,
enfield pistol forum
,

enfield pistol parts

,
enfield revolver disassembly
,
replacement grip for no2 enfield revolver
,
revolver enfield no 2 mk i
Click on a term to search for related topics.

Tags for this Thread

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1