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Thread: New gun

  1. #1
    Nambow89 is offline Junior Member
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    Smile New gun

    Ok I will be 21 in a few months. I am wanting a .45 preferably. I want to keep it in the $500 range. I prefer American made guns, but am open to others.What brands do you all prefer, their pricing, and why do you prefer them?

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    Freedom1911's Avatar
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    I am sure that some one here knows of a brand other than Hi Point that is 100% made in the USA, but I don't.
    There are 3 brands off the top of my head, Any Springfield item from their 1911 or XD/XDm lineup. Yup they are coming out with a 45acp XDm. Glock, new fan to this brand, not brainwashed yet, lets hope that never happens, and Bersa. Bersa is a great brand that gets little air play here in the US. They manufacture for Military and Police over seas.

    Also I understand the allure to the 45acp. But unless you can get a 50 round box of 45 for around 10.00 some place it might be prudent to buy a 9mm pistol instead of 45. You will be able to afford to shoot it more.

  4. #3
    Nambow89 is offline Junior Member
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    Yeah I have heard of Hi-Point. Heard of some mixed reviews on them. Springfields are cool guns. I am new to handguns really. I have shot some before. My brother has a Taurus .45. It is a fun gun to shoot. Trying to find out all brands really. I have heard of a brand called Kel-tech. Anybody know anything about them?

  5. #4
    twomode is offline Member
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    I almost want to say the variety is almost endless. Have you shot/handled any of your options yet? That's an important step. When I bought my first I had shot a bunch of different range rentals, but when I wrapped my hands around my XD40, that was it. I knew I found my first, and I've never regretted it.

  6. #5
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    From what I understand, Kel-Tec is a great company and makes good guns. I haven't really heard any complaints about them. They're just not for me, I'm personally a fan of my Glock.

    To 2nd what was said earlier, go to a range that rents guns, and handle & shoot as many as you possibly can. This is really the only way you'll know what you like and what will fit you best. I would also strongly consider the 9mm round over the .45. A buddy of mine (who turned 21 within the last year or so) bought a Glock in .45, and he can't afford to practice with it. Don't fall for the "Something that starts with a 4 is the only thing that'll stop someone" mantra. Its false. Look on some threads here and some ballistics test posted here as well.

    Good luck with your search and welcome to the forum!

    Also, check out the 1st hangun purchase stick in the new to handguns area. That helped me a lot with my first purchase!

  7. #6
    Freedom1911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nambow89 View Post
    Yeah I have heard of Hi-Point. Heard of some mixed reviews on them. Springfield's are cool guns. I am new to handguns really. I have shot some before. My brother has a Taurus .45. It is a fun gun to shoot. Trying to find out all brands really. I have heard of a brand called Kel-tech. Anybody know anything about them?
    My brother has a P32. He shoots it ok, I can't hit the broad side of a barn with it.
    Not enough grip. But he likes it, he has several hundred rounds through it and it still has hang ups from time to time, which may be nothing more than him limp wristing the gun.

    I prefer not to get smaller than a G19 or the Walther P99. Some might call those full size guns, but they are small to me and as small as I care to go.

    I hope you find a good gun that you are happy with.

  8. #7
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    It's not what we prefer, but what you will prefer. Here's some advice:
    • Find a shooting range that rents pistols by the hour (or half-hour, or whatever) and invest enough money in rental fees and ammunition to find out which pistol (or pistols) feels best in your hand, and is within your power to control well.
    • If your chosen pistol is out of your purchase-price range, buy a used one. Get a written money-back guarantee (even if with a time limit) and then take the gun to an independent gunsmith to find out if anything's wrong with it.
    • Do not buy a small pistol of any caliber. You are a beginner, and mini-pistols are for experts. Learn with a full-size pistol. Switch to something smaller after you have gained a lot of experience.
    • Although 9mm ammunition is usually the cheapest, it is my experience that a full-size .45 pistol is easiest to control and to learn to shoot well. This is not a matter of "stopping power," since a well-aimed hit from any practical-caliber gun will be very much the same as any other. The operative words here are "well aimed."
    • Once you've chosen your gun, practice with it. This does not require actual shooting, at first. Dry-fire practice will train your body in the fundamentals. Shoot later.
    • Practice, practice, practice, forever. Spend 10 minutes of dry-fire time every day (and no more—don't get tired), and then fire at least 50 shots every week. Forever. Really.

  9. #8
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    Steve you are the bomb! lol

  10. #9
    WINGFAN is offline Junior Member
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    I have had good luck with Ruger, as well as Springfield. I have the XD9sc that comes in a40. sweet size and handles easy. Look for what feels good in your hand and has a good warrenty. SW has a compact 45 that I am told & heard is good. Good luck.

  11. #10
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    If you are so budget minded at the outset, Nambow89, you really should consider something other than a .45. It's not good to not be able to afford to practice.

    A 9mm is a very good choice to balance shooting costs with a round that can perform for self-defense/home-defense if that's a concern. If self/home-defense isn't a concern and all you want to do is target shoot or plink, a .22 would be another option.

    If you go 9mm, there are lots of options. I'm partial to Glocks but also have enjoyed shooting the Springfield XDm and the S&W M&P. I tried a Ruger SR9 and while it shot well, I was a little put off by some of the problems that gun had when it was admittedly newer.

    Good luck in your search and take your time before making a purchase.

  12. #11
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    cougartex is offline Senior Member
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    The Stoeger Cougar .45 acp will be available in the next few months. Cost to be around $500.

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    Frank45's Avatar
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    No wiser words have ever been written
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    It's not what we prefer, but what you will prefer. Here's some advice:
    • Find a shooting range that rents pistols by the hour (or half-hour, or whatever) and invest enough money in rental fees and ammunition to find out which pistol (or pistols) feels best in your hand, and is within your power to control well.
    • If your chosen pistol is out of your purchase-price range, buy a used one. Get a written money-back guarantee (even if with a time limit) and then take the gun to an independent gunsmith to find out if anything's wrong with it.
    • Do not buy a small pistol of any caliber. You are a beginner, and mini-pistols are for experts. Learn with a full-size pistol. Switch to something smaller after you have gained a lot of experience.
    • Although 9mm ammunition is usually the cheapest, it is my experience that a full-size .45 pistol is easiest to control and to learn to shoot well. This is not a matter of "stopping power," since a well-aimed hit from any practical-caliber gun will be very much the same as any other. The operative words here are "well aimed."
    • Once you've chosen your gun, practice with it. This does not require actual shooting, at first. Dry-fire practice will train your body in the fundamentals. Shoot later.
    • Practice, practice, practice, forever. Spend 10 minutes of dry-fire time every day (and no more—don't get tired), and then fire at least 50 shots every week. Forever. Really.

  14. #13
    tekhead1219's Avatar
    tekhead1219 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    It's not what we prefer, but what you will prefer. Here's some advice:
    • Find a shooting range that rents pistols by the hour (or half-hour, or whatever) and invest enough money in rental fees and ammunition to find out which pistol (or pistols) feels best in your hand, and is within your power to control well.
    • If your chosen pistol is out of your purchase-price range, buy a used one. Get a written money-back guarantee (even if with a time limit) and then take the gun to an independent gunsmith to find out if anything's wrong with it.
    • Do not buy a small pistol of any caliber. You are a beginner, and mini-pistols are for experts. Learn with a full-size pistol. Switch to something smaller after you have gained a lot of experience.
    • Although 9mm ammunition is usually the cheapest, it is my experience that a full-size .45 pistol is easiest to control and to learn to shoot well. This is not a matter of "stopping power," since a well-aimed hit from any practical-caliber gun will be very much the same as any other. The operative words here are "well aimed."
    • Once you've chosen your gun, practice with it. This does not require actual shooting, at first. Dry-fire practice will train your body in the fundamentals. Shoot later.
    • Practice, practice, practice, forever. Spend 10 minutes of dry-fire time every day (and no more—don't get tired), and then fire at least 50 shots every week. Forever. Really.
    Words of wisdom based on experience from a wise sage. All new shooters should take these words in consideration before purchasing a handgun. Trying to mold your success on other shooters preferences will be a very long process.

  15. #14
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Not only are my ears ringing and my face red, but my beard has grown to what can be described either as sage length...or ZZ Top length.
    My ego no longer fits in our connubial bed, but now has become so large that it has taken over our guest bedroom. Too bad, if you were planning to visit.
    I just can't handle all this fame...

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