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  1. #1
    AP42 is offline Junior Member
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    Question "range-safe" ammo?

    What does this mean? Apparently it's steel/copper - so just the projectile is different, and should be okay for practicing, right? Is it going to perform much differently than lead/copper? I found it on the Natchez site and can try to put in a link if nobody knows what I'm talking about.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    clanger's Avatar
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    Some mandate all copper.

    Some mandate no exposed lead.

    Some mandate no jacketed rounds.

    Some mandate frangible rounds only.

    Some mandate no steel core or steel jacketed rounds (target damage and fire hazard).


    It all depends on that particular range's definition and restrictions. Give them a call if in doubt.

  3. #3
    tekhead1219's Avatar
    tekhead1219 is offline Senior Member
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    Just a guess, but, I think it means that they are FMJ bullets. Most indoor ranges don't allow exposed lead bullets. Again, it's just a guess.

  4. #4
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    zhurdan is offline Senior Member
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    It varies with different ranges. Some require "NO LEAD" bullets or frangibles as clanger pointed out. You wanna talk about making shooting expensive... go price out a 1000 frangible .223's! YIKES

  5. #5
    AP42 is offline Junior Member
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    Question

    I don't mean for a specific shooting range, I mean that's the name of it - full title is "Sellier and Bellot 9mm Luger 115 grain FMJ Range Safe Ammunition 50/box" It's steel core with copper jacket - why is that more dangerous than lead? And will it shoot the same? I'm very new at this and can barely hit the target at all, so don't want to use something that will make it harder to learn.

    Here's a link with more info: https://www.natchezss.com/Ammo.cfm?c...ion%2050%2Fbox

  6. #6
    zhurdan's Avatar
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    It's not more dangerous than lead from a shooting perspective, but from a "lead leeching into the ground" perspective. or "lead particles in the air" perspective. Steel cored stuff is harder on backstops. Frangible stuff is easier to clean up because it turns into a powder basically and contains no lead. It's a health and safety concern more than anything else.

    Range safe is just telling you there's not as much poison in the pill so to speak.

    It shouldn't perform any different than any other metals as the weight of a 115g 9mm in steel/copper is the same as a 115g 9mm in lead/copper.

  7. #7
    kev74's Avatar
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    It will likely shoot the same for target practice, but it doesn't have any of that pesky lead that has a habit of turing the air filters at your local range into hazardous waste (costs more $$$ to dispose of).

    Some ranges don't like steel core ammo because it can damage some backstops. Steel core ammo is sometimes refered to as "armor piercing".

  8. #8
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
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    Quote Originally Posted by zhurdan View Post
    It's not more dangerous than lead from a shooting perspective, but from a "lead leeching into the ground" perspective. or "lead particles in the air" perspective. Steel cored stuff is harder on backstops. Frangible stuff is easier to clean up because it turns into a powder basically and contains no lead. It's a health and safety concern more than anything else.

    Range safe is just telling you there's not as much poison in the pill so to speak.

    It shouldn't perform any different than any other metals as the weight of a 115g 9mm in steel/copper is the same as a 115g 9mm in lead/copper.
    For a given weight bullet all copper or copper/steel bullets will be longer than lead or jacketed lead bullets. That will require the bullet to protrude further out of the case or powder capacity will be diminished.

    They would have to perform a little different but not necessarily enough to cause problems.

    The only way to know how different is to shoot some.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kev74 View Post
    It will likely shoot the same for target practice, but it doesn't have any of that pesky lead that has a habit of turing the air filters at your local range into hazardous waste (costs more $$$ to dispose of).

    Some ranges don't like steel core ammo because it can damage some backstops. Steel core ammo is sometimes refered to as "armor piercing".
    +1 The range I shoot at actually takes a magnet swipe across the ammo you bring to the range to ensure it is not steel..

  10. #10
    AP42 is offline Junior Member
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by kev74 View Post
    Some ranges don't like steel core ammo because it can damage some backstops. Steel core ammo is sometimes refered to as "armor piercing".
    I had no idea. So for the outdoor bring-your-own-target range, these should be fine, but the indoor place with the mechanized targets may not allow it. I do like the idea of less lead dust to take home to the kids. Thanks everyone!

  11. #11
    SaltyDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AP42 View Post
    I had no idea. So for the outdoor bring-your-own-target range, these should be fine, but the indoor place with the mechanized targets may not allow it. I do like the idea of less lead dust to take home to the kids. Thanks everyone!
    Actually at the indoor range it is the backstop/collector that is in jeopardy.

    Simplifying it - the rear wall at an indoor range is normally a ramp or a four sided angled steel plate or rubberthat slows down the bullet and catches it in a trap. Steel bullets can penetrate this barrier. The range owners would not be happy campers if that happens.

  12. #12
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    yup, they restricted rifle use period except for .22LR at the indoor range here because some AP or steel core rounds went through the wall and damaged the owners truck! However there is so many outdoor places and BLM land to shoot on it's okey dokie with me!

  13. #13
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    Steel bullets can start fires in the forest or desert areas. Rock + steel = sparks.

    Because of that it should not be used in our wild land areas either.

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