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  1. #26
    Crux is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by James NM View Post
    I didn't say "glock-type". I specified Glock, as a DAO for your benefit, since you are new to handguns. I don't need you to list the exceptions to the rule for my benefit, as I am aware of them. I am not new to handguns.
    Easy James. I was just going by your line here where you said:

    If you go with a DAO like a Glock
    I didn't say you said "glock-type". But you did obviously say "DAO like a Glock". I'm not looking for a fight

    And I get why thumb safeties are absolutely necessary on a 1911. I also get why they aren't absolutely required on handguns where the first pull is a DA (be it DAO or DA/SA). My question more pertains to whether or not there is a compelling reason to avoid having a thumb safety on the latter of the two (ie the DAO or DA/SA). I understand fully that a large proportion are made without them, just as some are made with them. I'm just making sure there isn't something I'm missing before I make my final decision.

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  3. #27
    nailer is offline Member
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    I don't see the problem. It's no big deal if there is a thumb safety or not. It takes no time to" thumb it" off/on.

  4. #28
    Crux is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for all the replies folks. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't sacrificing something major or doing anything silly by getting a semi-auto with a thumb safety (excepting the SAO which obviously need them ). I appreciate the input and comments from people. Very helpful!

  5. #29
    clanger's Avatar
    clanger is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crux View Post
    1- So I guess really my preference for trigger would be either a DAO or a SA for consistency.

    2- I'd prefer to get the same pull each time.

    3- Outside of that, safety is a major concern. I have a daughter. I'm not considering a thumb safety as any sort of a guard against her shooting herself - if she gets her grubby little hands on a firearm I own without supervision then it's too fricking late to be worrying about thumb safeties. I'm more concerned with the 'shit happens' kind of thing.

    4- I just view a thumb safety as one more layer that takes the chances of a 'shit happens' discharge from one in a million to one in a billion.

    5- My leanings right now are towards a 1911, or if I can be patient was thinking about getting the P30s when it comes out later this year.


    1- Um...huh?

    2- Easy: go SA. Or get an XD (it's a SA striker type)

    3- Don't point yer gun at yer daughter, and, GET A SAFE, GET A SAFE, GET A SAFE before you even think of bringing a firearm into the house. There's no such thing as a safe firearm. It's even more unsafe when it is not locked up.

    4- In the time it takes to verify your target the thumb safety will have been off for twice that long. If you've trained with your shooter enough to make a difference in a dyanmic critical incident you'll be automatic.

    5- Get them both and become proficent with them. The grip on the 1911 is unlike anything else. Impossible to confuse a poly or DAO with a 1911.

    Back in the day troops carrried in condition Zero. Cocked and unlocked. They replaced a lot of rollers and the mil. mandated a grip (passvie/momentary) and thumb safety (manual) to prevent ND as the pistol was a SA w/ a very light trigger.

  6. #30
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    I just gotta jump in here...

    I understand what you said, about always having the same trigger pull, and that it could be either DAO or single-action. I agree with that point of view.
    I used to carry an SA pistol (M1911A1, with some modifications), but I have switched to DAO. Here's why:
    1. I would occasionally find that the pistol's safety had become accidentally switched to "off" by clothing- or holster-rub.
    2. I could not always wear a cover garment, so I sometimes had to use fanny-pack carry. That usually moved the safety to "off."
    3. I finally settled on pocket carry as something I could do regardless of clothing style or weather. SA pistols are completely unsuitable for pocket carry.

    Next, about children and guns:
    I raised a daughter who evidenced intellectual ability and curiosity at a very early age. Nevertheless, we never had a safe or other gun locker.
    Long guns were kept in an unlocked, glass-front cabinet, the doors of which were too heavy for her to move until she was old enough to know not to. Pistols were kept in a drawer that was too high for her to reach until she knew enough not to. Ammunition was kept in my workshop, in a locked, fireproof container, far from all of the guns.
    The loaded pistol in the house was always on a parent's person, except at night. At night, it was kept on top of the nightstand, by the bed.
    One parent was always at home. This is the most important fact of all. Further, the at-home parent (not always my wife) exercised constant, but discreet, supervision. Even when our daughter learned to climb trees, and was allowed to do it "by herself," a parent was always watching from somewhere nearby.
    From the earliest age, she was not permitted to "play guns." She was strongly discouraged from even pointing her finger and saying "Bang!" When neighborhood kids were in our home, we did the same with them, and she was instructed not to join in "shooting" games. Thus, never in her life was a gun seen as a toy or plaything.
    Early in her life, I introduced her to guns. Under close supervision, she was allowed at her every request to handle and "play with" the guns in our house, and to familiarize herself with them. When she got old enough, I cut-down a single-shot .22 rifle to fit her, and I took her shooting. I kept very close supervision, and I gently corrected her errors and taught her gun safety. She was instructed that she was never to touch any of our guns without our supervision.
    She was instructed to immediately come home, or to phone us to come and get her, if ever she saw a gun out in the open and outside of parental control in someone else's home. This actually happened, but only once.
    She's now in her mid-30s, and she's still gun-safe.
    It doesn't require a safe or lockbox. It requires careful and attentive parenting.

  7. #31
    clanger's Avatar
    clanger is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    I just gotta jump in here...

    She was strongly discouraged from even pointing her finger and saying "Bang!"

    *

    It doesn't require a safe or lockbox. It requires careful and attentive parenting.

    I used to get yelled at for that too...*never point a gun ..!!!.....etc*

    *

    I normally agree with ya bud, but, I gotta say- way wrong on the second point.
    Proper instruction is mandatory- but, does not replace reponsible firearms ownership.

    There's only one way to properly store a firearm in a home with a family.
    Not doing so will leave you open to liability, or, getting shot with your own bullet should someone come home before you.

    You may be able to control the actions of your own, but you may not be able to control the actions of others, esp when you are away.

    In California it is a HUGE felony if a minor finds your firearm and takes it out of doors, or worse, someone gets hurt with it. You WILL go to prison for same, no if's and's or butt's. Period, don't pass go etc. Yer done.


    *


    I cannot state this strongly enough, if you ever have children about in your home, lock up your firearmarms when not in use. If someone wishes to disagree, fine- your option, but I cannot recomend strongly enough against it.



    My .02, YMMV.
    Last edited by clanger; 06-03-2009 at 03:32 PM.

  8. #32
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    It doesn't require a safe or lockbox. It requires careful and attentive parenting.
    In my case, both are required. I have a two year old and a six year old. The two year old, 'nough said, he gets into everything. My oldest, as many of you know, has Autism. He "knows" guns are a no-touch. There are no toy guns in the house to avoid confusion between the real deal and the fake. Even though he has had the instruction, with his diagnosis, there is a chance that all the instruction I have given him will go out the window for a split second. I believe I am a very attentive parent but I am not willing to take any chances. Guns are on me or locked up, there are no other options in this house.

    And like CA, you get in deep doo-doo here in NC if a minor gets your gun.

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