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  1. #21
    hipmatt is offline Junior Member
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    I have the M&P but with a mag safety only. I prefer my gun this way. I don't want to worry about a safety in the event I need to use my gun. Anyways go with the M&P. It is a great gun.

  2. #22
    topdog9000's Avatar
    topdog9000 is offline Junior Member
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    Just purchased a new SW990L and much like a glock it has a partially cocked striker and no safety or decocker. However it is essentially a DAO pistol and would be unlikely to have an accidental misfire while holstered. I really like this new purchase and I know the M&P's are just as good. Go for it

  3. #23
    clanger's Avatar
    clanger is offline Member
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    If you get one with a manual safety (or decocker), take some classes on defensive shooting.

    They will teach you propper presentation of a firearm.

    In the 'ready position', the safety is on, upon presentation you cross an imaginary line where the safety comes off (single action). And- comes back on again when going from presented back to ready as the 'line' is crossed again (SA/decocker).

    I automatically thumb the safety off as soon as I start to present, be it from the ready position or holstered going through the ready position.

    Anytime I'm in the ready position the safety is on (or decocked). Any extension from there means safety gets clicked off and you are assessing/firing on a threat. It becomes automatic after a while.

    I very much prefer a clean breaking single-action pistol over a DA or DAO.
    The thumb-saftey on some 1911-type's is so natural it's neat-o.

    DA/DAO requires less fiddling w/ a longer trigger pull. Grab and shoot.

    I like being cocked-n-locked.

  4. #24
    Pistolero's Avatar
    Pistolero is offline Member
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    There is also the safety of knowing that if the weapon was stripped from you there's a chance the criminal type who has it in his hand can't quickly turn it on you, work the safety properly and fire. Some LEO's also use weapons that won't fire without the magazine seated so, if in a struggle for control of the weapon, they can hit the mag release and the gun won't fire.

    Personally, I carry a gun that has no external safety (decock model) and that is what makes me feel safe. If I have to shoot, I want it to function quickly with as little fuss as possible. Get the gun you like most and practice, practice, practice. Both are exceptional and will serve you well.

  5. #25
    ZO6Vettever is offline Junior Member
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    I don't want a manual safety, a DAO semi-auto should have a heavy enough trigger to prevent an AD and a holster with the trigger covered is a must.

  6. #26
    babs's Avatar
    babs is offline Member
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    Interesting discussion.. VERY.

    Here's a question for the experienced carry fellows..
    I assumed, when in carry, during a SD occurrence, that the only time typically that the weapon has been drawn is AFTER the point of deciding that it will be used.. if possible.

    In other words, if I were to draw the weapon, I would have already made the decision to draw, aim, fire in defense. (typically)..

    ... Is this the correct tactical mind-set to have?
    Given of course every scenario is different in which case in a split second you might find yourself able to avoid final trigger pull.

    If the answer is YES, meaning draw = decision to use DDF, then the holster itself is a primary safety (trigger guard, etc) and the brain is the 1st primary safety. That makes the gun's mechanical safeties there mainly to prevent discharge while holstering. A good argument for the 1911 mode of carry (hammer back, safety on), where the grip safety, thumb safety, and trigger guard are the mech. discharge safeties.

    ... Asking humbly as I'm looking to learn something here.. Is that all gunk or proper defensive carry logic?
    Last edited by babs; 04-08-2009 at 01:19 PM.

  7. #27
    Bisley's Avatar
    Bisley is offline Senior Member
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    Someone suggested that LEO's typically fail to keep their finger off the trigger in stressful situations, and while I have no way of knowing if this is correct, I think it is not really relevant to me, because of the differences in the circumstances that LEO's face, compared to what I am likely to face, as an armed civilian.

    When a policeman draws his weapon, more often than not, he is in an offensive posture, has probably identified himself, and is going to attempt to talk the bad guy into surrender. So, he is brandishing his weapon and using it as a threat to make the 'suspect' submit to the authority of the law. The suspect is likely to be in a defensive posture, preferring escape, over violence. The typical LEO will probably draw his weapon many times, over the course of his career, but will rarely fire it.

    An armed citizen, on the other hand, is the prey. He will not draw a gun unless a predator has chosen him for his victim, so the likelihood is that he will just be lucky if he even has time to draw, much less make a speech. If he draws his gun, he is going to fire it at the perpetrator, unless the perpetrator submits or retreats very quickly. Brandishing the weapon is not smart in such a situation, even if there is time for that, and in fact, is probably even illegal.

    For this reason, I prefer a gun for carry that does not have a 'flip' safety. Under controlled conditions, I will never point a gun at anyone, nor will my finger be inside the trigger guard, until my sights are in the vicinity of the target. This is the way I train, and the way I intend to execute, in any situation.

    Whether or not I can perform as planned is, of course, not known, but my belief is that if ever attacked and forced to defend myself, I will probably have to fire my weapon, so I will be better served by something very simple and fast.

  8. #28
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Here's my .02

    I love the way my XD-40 will not fire unless the pin is held down on the back of the grip. The shop owner and I are of the same opinion, when you pull your gun you don't want to think twice about the safety.

    My Sig P229 don't have any safety and that's ok, but again I love the XD-40 safety.

  9. #29
    babs's Avatar
    babs is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnet158 View Post
    My Sig P229 don't have any safety and that's ok, but again I love the XD-40 safety.
    Std Sig hammer DA/SA action.. On the first shot, treat it pretty much like a revolver (once chambered and decocked).. Pull trigger, it goes bang (Sig's go bang every time). Nice SA trigger after that until empty or decocked.

  10. #30
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by babs View Post
    Std Sig hammer DA/SA action.. On the first shot, treat it pretty much like a revolver (once chambered and decocked).. Pull trigger, it goes bang (Sig's go bang every time). Nice SA trigger after that until empty or decocked.

    True, but when I (and most people) think safeties, I think about a button next to the trigger.

  11. #31
    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by I'mStrapped View Post
    Glocks have a triple safety. All three are dissengaged when you pull the trigger. If you have a good holster that fully covers the trigger guard, and there is no way for you to hit the trigger without removing it from the holster, then in my opinion it is just as safe as a gun with an external safety lever. In either case the real safty is your trigger finger. I carry different guns in differnet places, with and without safeties. I don't get hung up on wether the gun I have on has a saftey or not. I don't feel any more comfortable with an H&K with the safety on than I do with a glock with "no safety". Like you said if your gun has a safety then you just have to remeber to disengage it when you draw. And of course practice. If the safety makes you feel more comfortable then I would suggest you get the S&W. All that matters is what works for you. If possible you should shoot each and see which works best for you.
    I'm sorry but the only safety in a Glock is to not put your finger inside the trigger guard. I know how their built I know what they say but you place your finger inside the trigger guard it's live. IO can say my Sigs have a safety if I leave the hammer down so they only fire DA then. But when one thinks of a safety they think of a button or lever outside of the trigger guard.

    I'm not putting Glock down. They are great weapons. It's just reality. The weapon was designed and built for whenever the shooter places their finger on the trigger they will go bang. The rest are measures taken for if the weapon is dropped or the like in that case they will not go bang. I know it's only an opinion but the term "safe action" does not really imply they have a safety. The only way to ensure the weapon will not fire is to not get your booger hook inside the trigger guard...period.

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