Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Dry Firing

  1. #1
    PaulT228 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    9

    Dry Firing

    Hello All,

    I have been lurking here for months and thanks to this forum i have obtain valuable gun safty tips and handgun knowledge. For Christmas i decided to treat myself. I bought a Taurus 24/7 (40cal), a Smith and Wesson M&P (9mm) and a Ruger SR9 (9mm). All in my opinion are great shooting gun.

    I have search this forum about Dry Firing but came up empty. With todays newer guns (like the one's I bought) is it ok to dry fire them without fear of any damage?

    Thanks in advance all. I look forward to asking many questions as my collections grow!!!

  2. #2
    bruce333's Avatar
    bruce333 is offline HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wilson's Mills, NC
    Posts
    2,496
    Here is a good one:

    300 Dry Fires per DAY

    I dry fire all the time (not as much as in the post above). I do use snap-caps, don't see a reason not to. Cheap insurance.

    AFAIK any modern center fire handgun can be dry fired without a problem. However, if the owners manual says not to dry fire I wouldn't.

    edit: oh yeah...Welcome aboard!
    Bruce, Life Member: NRA, NCRPA, GRNC, GOA

    Naval Air Museum Barbers Point

    "I personally think we developed language because of our deep inner need to complain."--Jane Wagner
    "The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom."
    -Isaac Asimov

  3. #3
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
    TOF is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northern Arizona
    Posts
    3,015
    Welcome

    I know the M&P's will handle dry firing. They are pretty good with bullets also.

  4. #4
    Dsig1's Avatar
    Dsig1 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    687
    I dry fire my 24/7 a lot, always using snap caps. After each SA pull, you need to set your finger on the trigger with a bit of force but not enough to invoke the DA second strike. With that bit of force on the trigger, pull the slide back about 1/4" - 3/8" (not far enough to eject the snap cap) to reset the striker mechanism for the next SA pull.

    Otherwise, you will pull SA on your first squeeze and then keep on dry firing in DA. This would be a fruitless effort since the 24/7 is a SA gun and you may never fire it in DA (only for second strike of a failed primer).

  5. #5
    Doc Amentler's Avatar
    Doc Amentler is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    14
    I dry fire all the time. Like others, I also use snap caps. Make sure when you dry fire that ALL live ammo is out of the room. Another good use for snap caps is when you go the range. Have your buddy load your magazines and you load his. Put snap caps randomly in the mags and work on malfunction clearance. Oh yeah, did I mention that you need to make sure that ALL live ammo is out of the room before you dry fire?

  6. #6
    BT2Flip's Avatar
    BT2Flip is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    COW HAMPSTER
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Amentler View Post
    Make sure when you dry fire that ALL live ammo is out of the room.

    WELCOME .. This is a VERY good point !

  7. #7
    PaulT228 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    9
    Thanks for all the helpful info!! I'm going to buy some snap caps for my toys (better safe then sorry ) ...

    P.S.. I make absolutely sure there are no live ammo in the room while dry firing..

  8. #8
    buck32's Avatar
    buck32 is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    925
    Welcome from Big Sky Country.

  9. #9
    Ram Rod's Avatar
    Ram Rod is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Washington county, arkansas
    Posts
    1,026
    Check with the specific manufacturer or owners manual for your pistols. I dry fire my Glocks thousands of times in a year, but I won't dry fire my SIG P220 SAO since it's hammer and firing pin. Striker fired pistols are generally okay to dry fire...conventional hammer/firing pin pistols can be up to debate, but I wouldn't.

  10. #10
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North-Central USA
    Posts
    4,415
    Dry fire is a great way to ingrain habits, but they can still be good habits or bad habits. Make your practice as realistic as possible by wearing the same safety gear (eye and ear protection) and by using dummy rounds to practice loading at the same time.

  11. #11
    WVleo is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    23
    Hi, Just purchsaed a Kahr PM9 and the Kahr Web site states that it's ok to dry fire Kahr pistols ! I still throw in a snap cap as old habits die hard ! I like the idea of having no live ammo in the same room You dry fire in . ....WVleo
    Last edited by WVleo; 01-25-2009 at 04:25 PM. Reason: terable spelling

  12. #12
    buck32's Avatar
    buck32 is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    925
    I would only go by the owners manual or website. I too have a PM9 and have dry fired it with no ill effects. However, if the manual states not to or does not state then that HG will NOT be dry fired. I will use snap caps for that one.

    Just my .02

  13. #13
    tonyjh is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Georgia, U.S.A.
    Posts
    25
    What are "snap caps", and where can I find them? Thanks!

  14. #14
    buck32's Avatar
    buck32 is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    925
    Snap caps are dummy rounds made specifically for the caliber of weapon you own. They are used for dry firing to prevent over extension of a firing pin and other critical parts of a gun.

    They can also be used to highlight shooting errors. For example, have a friend load your gun and place a snap cap in the mag or cylinder. If you pull the trigger and it goes click you will notice where the gun is pointing etc. and determine if you are jerking the trigger, anticipating recoil etc.

    They are a good little shooting aid and help protect your firearm.

    Typically Snap Caps can be found at a well supplied local gun store. If not you can buy them on-line but the amount of shipping typically is as much as the snap caps.

    Hopefully, I have explained this cleary and accurately without too much manutia.

    Good luck and keep asking questions.

    buck32

  15. #15
    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    3,373
    Quote Originally Posted by TOF View Post
    Welcome

    I know the M&P's will handle dry firing. They are pretty good with bullets also.
    Most the poly Smith autos will say in the manual it's OK to dry fire. I've not seen a M&P manual ...yet

  16. #16
    clanger's Avatar
    clanger is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    So. Cal.
    Posts
    515

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
    Dry fire is a great way to ingrain habits, but they can still be good habits or bad habits. Make your practice as realistic as possible by wearing the same safety gear (eye and ear protection) and by using dummy rounds to practice loading at the same time.
    Excellent advice.

    I love using A-Zooms. Always use some sort of dummy-round. Why? Cuz you are checking, loading, unloading the mag/cylinder and just not picking it up and clicking away.

    Treat them as live ammo a well. Follow the Rules, pretend you are at the range. Focus and practice with a plan. Not in front of the tube, etc.
    Treat dry-friing as the real thing and training, cus that's exactly what it is. Training. Nothing else will train your hands and eye's as well, and, save wear and tear on your rig and body.

    I'm usually pretty amped to go shooting and pretty darn hyper for an old guy. After I set up, I dry-fire several cylinders on a live line- at least 5 mins, especially indoors. Outdoors, I'll do a round on all the swingers, etc. I never just toe-up and start blamming. Dry-firing calms me down and gets me into a rythym. It looks wierd to some, but when the paper comes back on the wire with the orange thing in the center of it missing, or yer clanging steel at 200y, it sure don't feel weird.

    Dry-firing, like any training, is key. If it's good enough for the Pro's, it's good enough for me.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

centerfire pistols can be dried fired

,

does it damage a taurus 24/7 pro to dry fire it

,

dry fire kahr pm 9

,

dry firing a smith and wesson m&p pistol

,

dry firing kahr mk9

,

firing pin overextension dry firing smith and wesson

,

it's ok to dry fire a m&p9c

,

kahr pm9 dry firing

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1