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  1. #1
    Brian73 is offline Junior Member
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    Question Complete newbie needs advice

    I'm new here and based on a lot of the posts I read here I think I want to make a 9mm my first handgun. Before I even set foot in a store I want to get some advice on which brands/models will best suit my needs.

    - I have small hands

    - I only plan to use the gun at a range. I want to find out if I have any talent with target shooting and if I do I'd like to get involved in competitions.

    - I've never owned any sort of firearm before so I am a complete newbie.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction or steer me away from the wrong one?

    Thanks,
    Brian

  2. #2
    tekhead1219's Avatar
    tekhead1219 is offline Senior Member
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    Welcome from SE TX. Keep in mind "small hands" is a relative statement. My advice is go to a local gun shop and hold several until one feels good. For your first handgun, you have the right idea in a 9mm. Have fun with your search, also get into an NRA training class. Keep us posted.

  3. #3
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    Take an NRA Basic Pistol class before you set foot in a gun store. http://www.nrahq.org/education/training/find.asp

    If the gun is for the range, rather than defense, consider starting with a good .22. Competition is often very gun-specific, and the chances of getting something suitable for an unknown future type of competition are on the slim side. A good .22 will allow you to learn the fundamentals of pistol shooting with minimal recoil and at very low cost.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  4. #4
    Fred40 is offline Member
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    It would be very helpful if you knew what type of competition you might be interested in. Different competitions favor and or require particular styles or calibers.

    I started out in bullseye shooting (target shooting, one handed at 25 and 50 yards) which requires a .22 and a .45ACP if you want to shoot the full competition. You need at least a .22 to get started (which is what I did). In bullseye virtually everyone shoots a 1911 for their .45. You could shoot a 9mm for the "center fire" portion of the competition.....but most simply shoot their .45 for that portion as well.

  5. #5
    JeffWard's Avatar
    JeffWard is offline Senior Member
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    Excellent advice above.

    I have a Browning Buckmark 22, but many here like the Rugers.

    For a simple, reliable, accurate, and reasonably priced centerfire gun, for range work only, I'd start with a 9mm XD9 Tactical (5"), or a similar, long-sight-radius 9mm (4-5"), like a Glock or M&P.

    Once you aquire a taste for platform, caliber, etc... then make a move to exactly what you want. The 9mm XD/Glock/M&P will be easy to sell or trade if you chose another platform. Or just keep it forever. They'll all out-live you.

    JeffWard

  6. #6
    Brian73 is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks guys. I guess I need to figure out what kind of competition shooting is available in my area and decide which area to look into. I'll definitely take the NRA classes. Which comes first...Basic Pistol or First Steps? So you know if I would need to have any type of license or permit before attending?
    Is there a big difference in cost between a .22 and a 9mm?

    Thanks for all the replies. Please keep em coming!

  7. #7
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    If you plan to take Basic Pistol, you can just skip First Steps.

    The difference in price between a good .22 and a decent 9mm isn't a whole lot, but the difference in ammo cost is very large.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  8. #8
    Wyatt's Avatar
    Wyatt is offline Member
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    Take the Basic. I believe FIRST Steps is for instruction on a specific firearm.

    .22 ammo is WAY cheaper than just about anything including 9mm, though 9mm is among the cheapest of centerfire rounds suitable for defense. Compared to everything else it's almost free to shoot .22's.

  9. #9
    Brian73 is offline Junior Member
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    I just sent an email to register for the Basic Pistol course next month. Looking forward to it!

  10. #10
    submoa is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian73 View Post
    I'm new here and based on a lot of the posts I read here I think I want to make a 9mm my first handgun. Before I even set foot in a store I want to get some advice on which brands/models will best suit my needs.

    - I have small hands

    - I only plan to use the gun at a range. I want to find out if I have any talent with target shooting and if I do I'd like to get involved in competitions.

    - I've never owned any sort of firearm before so I am a complete newbie.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction or steer me away from the wrong one?

    Thanks,
    Brian
    The new shooter FAQ should be of interest to you... especially regarding small hands.

    FAQ for New Shooters

    Have to emphasize that most courses and ranges will allow you to rent/borrow guns. So you can learn without having to put up hundreds in advance for a gun you might end up not liking anyways. Since you plan on shooting at the range anyways, its probably a good idea for you to hold off buying as long as you can and shoot as many different kinds of guns as they can rent you to find what you really shoot the best. This way, you can even shoot guns that would be considered wrong for you to learn why they are so wrong to appreciate the features of ones that are good.

  11. #11
    Brian73 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by submoa View Post
    The new shooter FAQ should be of interest to you... especially regarding small hands.

    FAQ for New Shooters

    Have to emphasize that most courses and ranges will allow you to rent/borrow guns. So you can learn without having to put up hundreds in advance for a gun you might end up not liking anyways. Since you plan on shooting at the range anyways, its probably a good idea for you to hold off buying as long as you can and shoot as many different kinds of guns as they can rent you to find what you really shoot the best. This way, you can even shoot guns that would be considered wrong for you to learn why they are so wrong to appreciate the features of ones that are good.
    Thanks for the link.
    Great advice on renting. I'll look into that too. Thanks.



    I was just informed the class I wanted to attend is already filled up so I am on stand-by if there is a cancellation.

  12. #12
    Blkhawk73's Avatar
    Blkhawk73 is offline Member
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    My suggestion, start with a .22lr chambered revovler. Get the basics down with that and then progress. With the low recoil and low report, you'll be less likely to develop involuntary responses (flinches) with the less poerful cartridge. It'll also allow a LOT of shooting for little cost as the ammo is verry inexpensive for plinking stuff. Sure it's not "cool" like a centerfire is but it's less "cool" tohave poor shooting skills that can easily develop from even a 9mm as a beginner.

  13. #13
    Ram Rod's Avatar
    Ram Rod is offline Senior Member
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    Glock.....G17 or 19. They are 9mm. Four or five magazine, and you'd be ready to shoot production class USPSA. Find a local club and start having fun!

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