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  1. #21
    JONSCH's Avatar
    JONSCH is offline Junior Member
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    get an HK with adjustable sights. these things are so accurate, durable, and reliable. thats why they cost more

  2. #22
    Bisley's Avatar
    Bisley is offline Senior Member
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    I have a CZ-75B in 9mm, and the Kadet .22 conversion kit for it. It is an almost perfect practice combo. The 9mm is capable of 2" groups at 25 yards, from the factory, and the .22 is also very accurate. It is an all steel gun with a ~5" barrel, and can be operated from the cocked and locked position, like a 1911, or fired double-action (first shot) like other popular self-defense handguns. Mine (in 9mm) has never even 'burped,' after a couple thousand rounds of the cheapest ammo I can find, or with premium JHP's.

    I typically take several handguns to the range and fire as many rounds as I can afford in the center fire calibers. Then, I finish up by sticking the .22 slide on the CZ (takes 30 seconds) and shooting bulk pack .22 ammo until my hands start cramping from loading magazines. It's a great way to get lots of repetition.

    The CZ is a very fine pistol at a fair price, about $450, plus ~$250 if you want to add the .22 conversion kit.

  3. #23
    Mike_E's Avatar
    Mike_E is offline Junior Member
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    My preference for a good range gun are the SIG P226 and the Beretta 92FS. Both are easy to shoot, reliable, and accurate.

  4. #24
    PhilR. is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bisley View Post
    I have a CZ-75B in 9mm, and the Kadet .22 conversion kit for it. It is an almost perfect practice combo. The 9mm is capable of 2" groups at 25 yards, from the factory, and the .22 is also very accurate. It is an all steel gun with a ~5" barrel, and can be operated from the cocked and locked position, like a 1911, or fired double-action (first shot) like other popular self-defense handguns. Mine (in 9mm) has never even 'burped,' after a couple thousand rounds of the cheapest ammo I can find, or with premium JHP's.
    I have a CZ 85Combat, which is essentially the same as your 75. It is probably the most accurate of my nines, which is saying a lot when you consider how many I have. I've been thinking about the conversion kit too -- can you mention something about the reliability and method of changeover? I would imagine that changing would be a simple matter of switching parts, but I've never used a conversion kit before.

    thanks,
    PhilR.

  5. #25
    Bisley's Avatar
    Bisley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilR. View Post
    ...I would imagine that changing would be a simple matter of switching parts, but I've never used a conversion kit before.
    It's almost as simple as removing the 9mm slide, and replacing it with the .22 slide, but not quite. The Kadet kit comes with clear instructions on how to fit it to the frame, and anybody can do it. There are three points on the .22 slide that may need to be fitted to the frame. It comes from the factory with these points slightly over-sized, so that each one can be fitted perfectly to each individual gun. CZ could have easily manufactured it 'loose,' so that it would have fit any of their guns without requiring any fitting at all, but it is a credit to their craftsmanship standards that they instead make it possible for the user to keep those tight tolerances that make for a more accurate handgun.

    All you need is a medium grit knife sharpening stone and five or ten minutes of your time to do a perfect job. You simply remove a very small amount of metal material from one major point, until the slide will fit on the frame. Once it fits well enough that you can get the pin in to lock the slide on, you just work the slide back and forth a few times to determine if it is dragging on the other two points. If so, apply a drop of oil to the slide rails and work it some more. If it's still too tight, hit those other two points very lightly with the stone. You want to leave it as tight as you can and still have it function, and then break it in like any new, tight tolerance gun. If you get carried away and remove too much metal, it will still work, but may be slightly less accurate than it would have been with tighter tolerances.

    In my case, I left it very tight, and carried the stone with me to the range, in case it was jamming too much. In fact, it worked perfectly the first time, and has worked well ever since. Mine will occasionally fail to feed a Federal hollow point, from a Walmart 550 bulk pack, but it devours the cheap Remington stuff in HP or round nose.

  6. #26
    PhilR. is offline Member
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    Thanks Bisley for your extensive answer. Sounds pretty easy, so I might have to get one sometime in the near future.

    I'm not surprised by the bulk-pack Fed's not cycling. They seem to be about the least powerful of the bulk-packs that I've tried, and I will often see cycle failures in several of our .22 auto's that otherwise run just fine. At least they cycle well in our Ruger single-six.....

    regards,
    PhilR.

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