View Poll Results: Wood vs. Rubber

Voters
106. You may not vote on this poll
  • Wood/Revolver

    41 38.68%
  • Wood/Pistol

    35 33.02%
  • Rubber/Revolver

    37 34.91%
  • Rubber/Pistol

    52 49.06%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34

Thread: Wood vs. Rubber

  1. #1
    DANtheDINOSAUR is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    5

    Wood vs. Rubber

    What grip would you prefer on pistol and/or revolver, wood or rubber?

  2. #2
    gmaske's Avatar
    gmaske is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,071
    Well let's see....I have a rubber grip on my S&W 586 and I just put a cheap set of rubber grips on my 1911 with palm swells to try that feature out. If I like it I'll buy a set of wood grips. I'm not real particular. I like the rubber on the 586 cause the stock anvil grips sucked. The rubber grip absorbs a lot of recoil of the 357 mag cartridge so they stayed. Rubber or wood.... It all depends on the pistol.

  3. #3
    Teuthis is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    442
    I have found that the rubber grips on magnum revolvers do absorb a lot of recoil and give on a firm purchase too. When I was shooting a great deal and had numerous pistols, it was my habit to put Pachmyers on almost everything. But I do not care for them on 1911 models.

  4. #4
    rollin thunder's Avatar
    rollin thunder is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    south florida
    Posts
    7
    I have a security six that I bought with Pachmeyers on it. I bought a set of original wood grips..... now I know why the Pachmeyers were on it.
    My 1911 has a set of Pachmeyers, Rosewood with rubber finger grips.

    If you are going to c.c. think about certain grips getting "hung" up.

    RT

  5. #5
    niadhf's Avatar
    niadhf is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Rural New York
    Posts
    1,197
    Gee Dan, it changes.
    My Officers model has wood, but I would happily put crimson trace on (rubber i believe) if i had the funds to do so. Course that is to add the laser sight.

    Mostly wood on all. But the Taurus model 85 i next have in line has rubber, and those will stay.

    Now on my soon to be owned Polymer, well wood isn't really an option now is it? So i would say polimer, or maybe a rubber after market gripcover, we'll see.
    How is that for a non-committed answer?

  6. #6
    Baldy's Avatar
    Baldy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Port St.John,FL.
    Posts
    6,740
    I like the looks of blue steel and wood the best. For carry some combinations I like rubber better for more control.

  7. #7
    James NM's Avatar
    James NM is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,091
    For shooting, I like rubber.
    For looking, I like wood.

  8. #8
    Liko81 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    214
    Wood:
    + Looks better
    + Gives more grip when wet or slick as rubber will slide
    + More durable than rubber overall.
    - uncomfortable/painful to shoot with for long periods
    - Gives a less positive grip unless custom-molded for the shooter's hand
    - Cleaning can be difficult or impossible unless done regularly and thoroughly.
    - If unfinished or finish wears, holds water longer than rubber.
    - More expensive
    - Most polymer frames won't even take them

    Rubber:
    + More positive grip, especially with grooved front strap
    + Cheaper than good wood grips
    + easy cleaning; the grip can generally be removed and scrubbed with dish detergent
    + Some "rubber" grip compounds are tacky/sticky, giving a coefficient of static friction greater than 1 (that gun ain't movin' in your hand)
    + virtually any gun can take a rubber grip, if only a sleeve
    - Though flexible, most rubber grips aren't as durable overall as wood
    - Looks cheap
    - can be difficult to install
    - Will tend to hold water against a metal frame.

  9. #9
    longbow is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    14
    Hmm, well, I'll make it even a little more complicated.

    On most steel pistols I prefer wood.
    On 'plastic' pistols I prefer a rubber or polymer grip.

    For revolvers I usually prefer rubber, but in some cases wood just looks a lot better.

  10. #10
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,548
    O.K. here's my preferance: Wood.

    Rubber, besides being as ugly as a mud fence, gives the gun a running start before hitting the web of my hand with heavy recoilling revolvers. And, rubber abrades the skin of my hand badly, wearing a blister at the base of my thumb. I did some shooting with a Thompson Contender fitted with Pachmyer grips and my hand was blistered and sore by the end of the day.

    And, grabbing my gun quick-like, I somethimes need to shift my grip slightly as the gun levels, this not possible with rubber.

    And, wood allows my vest or jacket to slide over it as I move around, never catching the material as does rubber.

    And, while this is relative, wood just gives me a solid feel in my hand.

    And, while not mentioned, ivory is even a better grip material.

    Bob Wright

  11. #11
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,458
    Proper combat hold on a semi-auto pistol places all the pressure on its grips' front- and back-straps, and no real pressure on the pistol's side panels. The firmest hold is aided by stippling or checkering on the front- and back-straps; but resilient rubber on those surfaces softens a firm hold and decreases control.
    Rubber side panels catch against the hand, when one moves the pistol in the strong hand (or merely moves the hand) to punch the magazine-release button when making a quick reload. This slows the process down.

    Conversely, I personally find that a rubber grip helps me establish better control of a revolver. I prefer the backstrap to be bare metal, but for me the front and side panels need to be "grippy."
    My preference comes from my observation that a smooth-handled revolver tends to rotate (in two separate planes) in my hand during both DA trigger presses and recoil, and that a "grippy" rubber handle tends to limit that rotation.
    My strong hand doesn't have to reposition itself during a revolver reload, so rubber grips don't affect that process at all.

  12. #12
    Spokes is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    South FL. East coast
    Posts
    93
    Rubber on a heavy recoiling revolver 357 magnum and up.
    Anything that meets your fancy on an auto.

  13. #13
    tony pasley's Avatar
    tony pasley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    clyde n.c.
    Posts
    2,168
    Wood grips, rubber is what a teenage boy keeps in his back pocket hoping to get lucky.

  14. #14
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,458
    Quote Originally Posted by tony pasley View Post
    Wood grips, rubber is what a teenage boy keeps in his back pocket hoping to get lucky.
    Yeah, but in certain circles the thing one puts the rubber on is called "wood."

  15. #15
    Pat Az's Avatar
    Pat Az is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Oro Valley, Arizona
    Posts
    40
    Rubber for more comfort.

  16. #16
    gmaske's Avatar
    gmaske is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,071
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Yeah, but in certain circles the thing one puts the rubber on is called "wood."
    I always felt it was kinda like taking a shower with a rain coat on....Ya just miss out on a whole bunch.

  17. #17
    Ram Rod's Avatar
    Ram Rod is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Washington county, arkansas
    Posts
    1,026
    Rubber on everything is what I say. Only thing I ever kept wood on was a Colt Trooper Mark IV.

  18. #18
    prcabr4christ's Avatar
    prcabr4christ is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by rollin thunder View Post
    I have a security six that I bought with Pachmeyers on it. I bought a set of original wood grips..... now I know why the Pachmeyers were on it.
    My 1911 has a set of Pachmeyers, Rosewood with rubber finger grips.

    If you are going to c.c. think about certain grips getting "hung" up.

    RT
    security six with wood....bad idea lol, PM was the best thing that ever happened to that gun!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Great Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    135

    Take a look at my collection...

    ...and then try to guess my preference.

    http://s142.photobucket.com/albums/r...%20collection/

  20. #20
    Old Padawan's Avatar
    Old Padawan is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    818
    What about Alumigrips or Stag?
    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it." -Mark Twain

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

colt trooper mark v grips

,

colt trooper mk v grips

,

do i need longer screws for sig equinox grips

,

pocket pistol grips wood vs rubber

,

possible to overtighten wood revolver grips

,

ruger security six forums

,

taurus model 80 vs 82

,

wood grips vs rubber for cc

,

wood grips vs rubber grips?

,

wood or rubber grip revolver

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1