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  1. #21
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    I wonder what Wolf uses...probably rusted out iron or something, hahaha.

    But seriously, the only jams I've ever had in my 1911 have been with non-nickel plated brass casings (CCI Blazer). Corbon, Speers, and Hornadys all run fine.

  2. #22
    Black Metal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fivehourfrenzy View Post
    But seriously, the only jams I've ever had in my 1911 have been with non-nickel plated brass casings (CCI Blazer
    Thats funny because cci blazer ammo uses aluminum cases

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew_Rami_P View Post
    Thats funny because cci blazer ammo uses aluminum cases
    Oh okay, well it's aluminum then...not nickel plated though I don't think.

  4. #24
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    hideit is offline Senior Member
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    bob:
    i recently read that the army did not go with it because it is easy to see
    thus it is ok for us at an outdoor range to find them but the army doesn't want the bg to be able to identify from a distance

  5. #25
    Teuthis is offline Member
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    If I remember correctly, the nickel plated cases were a little stiffer, and harder to resize in reloading them. I seem to remember it requiring a little more pressure on the press. That would be the only definitive difference I can perceive in them, except as someone said, they do not mildew in leather.

  6. #26
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    From http://www.lenntech.com/Periodic-cha...nts/Ni-en.htm:

    Nickel
    Nickel is silvery-white. hard, malleable, and ductile metal. It is of the iron group and it takes on a high polish. It is a fairly good conductor of heat and electricity. In its familiar compounds nickel is bivalent, although it assumes other valences. It also forms a number of complex compounds. Most nickel compounds are blue or green. Nickel dissolves slowly in dilute acids but, like iron, becomes passive when treated with nitric acid. Finely divided nickel adsorbs hydrogen.

    Applications

    The major use of nickel is in the preparation of alloys. Nickel alloys are characterized by strength, ductility, and resistance to corrosion and heat. About 65 % of the nickel consumed in the Western World is used to make stainless steel, whose composition can vary but is tipycally iron with aroun 18% chromium and 8% nichel. 12 % of all the nichel consumed goes into superalloys. The remaining 23% of consumption is divided between alloy steels, rechargeable batteries, catalysts and other chemicals, coinage, foundry products, and plating.
    Nickel is easy to work and can be drawn into wire. It resist corrosion even at high temperatures and for this reason it is used in gas turbines and rocked engines. Monel is an alloy of nickel and copper (e.g. 70% nichel, 30% copper with traces of iron, manganese and silicon), which is not only hard but can resist corrosion by sea water, so that it is ideal for propeller shaft in boats and desalination plants.

  7. #27
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hideit View Post
    bob:
    i recently read that the army did not go with it because it is easy to see
    thus it is ok for us at an outdoor range to find them but the army doesn't want the bg to be able to identify from a distance

    Well, if shiny is easy to see, then why did the Army use tinned cases?

    I don't think visibility of nickel vs. brass ever seriously entered into the equation. If Springfield or Frankford Arsenal had ever found any advantage to nickel plating, G.I.s would be loading shiny ammunition.

    Another one of those myths, like hearing the ping of an empty clip being ejected from an M1 rifle. Good story, but not true.

    Bob Wright

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