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  1. #21
    bdp2000 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilR. View Post
    As for part of the crew -- well, you can't be part of the crew until you ask here which is better, Glock or XD.....

    PhilR.
    Give me a bit. I'll get there eventually.

  2. #22
    wiseguy's Avatar
    wiseguy is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
    Given your budgetary restraints and intended uses, I'd first recommend a used S&W .38 revolver. It ain't all that sexy and "tacti-cool", but it'll do the two things that you want your handgun to do. You may have to look for a while to find something decent in that price range, but I think it's do-able.

    The only reliable autoloaders in serious personal defense calibers (9mm/.40/.45) that can be had for around $300 would be Rugers. Lots of folks look down on them because they are a bit bulky, not all that sleek, and perhaps a bit rough in the action; but they are also bull-strong, reliable as the sunrise, and can be VERY accurate once you find their favorite load and get used to their particular shooting characteristics.

    So -- revolver recommendation would be S&W .38 (maybe a model 10, model 15, or stainless models 64 or 67). For an automatic, try the Ruger P89 or P95 (9mm), P90 or P97 (.45 ACP), or whatever Ruger .40 that you might be able to find locally (I'm not a fan of the .40 cartridge, so I don't waste brain cells memorizing those model numbers).
    I look down on rugers not because of the bulk but simply because they're rugers

    haha all kidding aside I've heard a lot of bad things regarding reliability in their pistols with the exception of the 9mm, everyone who I know that has the 9mm ruger loves it and swears by it. I personally have had many bad experiences with rugers, from jams to takedown/cleaning problems, thus i stay away.

    Look for a used Glock? Or perhaps raise the spending price a little bit. For a first time handgun, especially if you intend to shoot it a lot I'd recommend a 9mm, you can find fairly cheap practice loads and some really hot defensive loads. Defensively the most important thing is practice practice practice.

    Mostly, go to local shops/ranges. Handle/shoot a variety of makes and models. When you find what you like, you will definitely know it.

    Good luck and welcome aboard.

  3. #23
    sesquipedalian101's Avatar
    sesquipedalian101 is offline Junior Member
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    Apparently, when one "times out" then logs in again while posting, the system actually completes the post, then takes you back to the edit page... I'll have to remember that and not continue "tweaking" the message w/o being sure I'm not double posting. (Two of my posts duplicated back to back would be like "double-tapping" with a .50 BMG -- Sorry!)
    Last edited by sesquipedalian101; 05-03-2008 at 08:19 AM. Reason: Accidental Double Post.

  4. #24
    sesquipedalian101's Avatar
    sesquipedalian101 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    Congrats on an intelligent purchase for your first gun…As far as defense, a quick magazine of .22s to the face will deter most attackers.
    I have several thoughts here:

    1) Most people who try a variety of firearms over time will find one that "just works." Your "perfect fit" may or may not be a make and model that anybody else can shoot well; it may or may not be the "model of your dreams"; but, the important thing is whether or not it works for you. True, most anybody can (within reason) learn to shoot most any gun well, but when you find that "magic moment" when a particular gun feels like an extension of your arm and you can shoot as well by "pointing your finger" as you do with the careful aim of another firearm, you'll know what I mean. So the folk who advised "go rent or borrow guns and try them" are on the right track -- I'd just add "take your time." You can miss something good by getting in too much of a hurry to try the 15 other pistols on your list today

    2) Way too many people underestimate the power of a .22! I once stopped 300 lbs of packaged porcine pique, bent on spoiling my day, with a single "snap shot" from a Ruger Mark II -- at about 30 feet. Mr. Piggy dropped like marionette with his strings cut; he didn't even kick. You can bet, properly placed, a .22 will do the same thing to an attacker. (Back in the '30s, before they passed laws requiring larger calibers, my Dad used to hunt deer, quite successfully, with a .22 Special.)

    3) If you are going for defense purposes, you might as well play to the .22's strengths -- which are several.
    A. Neat thing about a .22 jacketed solid point is that it will penetrate a number of vests that reliably stop larger calibers. So, you have a semi-auto with decent-sized magazine? I would make the 2nd, 4th, et cetera rounds good quality SCC rounds. (Note: JSP or FMJ would be better; but, to my knowledge, are available only in .22 mag.)
    B. For speed of second and third shots, the low recoil of a .22 semi-auto allows you to nail a second and third target very quickly. Practice follow-ups -- to second targets if possible.
    C. Ammo is dirt cheap which equates to easy-on-the-wallet live-fire practice. I do suggest, though, if you buy the large "bulk" boxes, you pay a buck or so more and get the "coated" or jacketed bullets -- they deform less rattling about in the box which means better accuracy when you shoot. Also, for actual defense purposes, buy (and practice with) some ammo that is packaged in 50 round boxes and chosen because of its special characteristics, not the price on the sale flyer.

    So, yes, congratulations on your first pistol! Use it to learn everything you can about the proper care, feeding, and use of firearms. And, if it happens to be the one that "fits" you, don't get badgered into "upgrading" just because someone "looks down their nose" at a .22; you just learn to "look down your sights" and remember that one well-placed .22 round beats a whole clip of .45s that barely missed.

  5. #25
    ajs510 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdp2000 View Post
    Well, after much deliberation, I decided that I want something to learn on and become comfortable with before I carry anything or buy a large HD weapon.

    So I went for the............Walther P22.

    So far great gun. Spant a few days on the range along with half a day with the father in law at his gunclub and I am very happy with it.

    Part of the crew now, I guess.
    Nice pick, that was my first handgun as well and it's in my pocket as we speak.

  6. #26
    kenn's Avatar
    kenn is offline Member
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    Niiice...

    Excellent choice. I have one and love it. I use it as a couch gun and take it upstairs at night. (for safety/burglary reasons. it doesn't have its own little bed or anything)
    Laser sights for that gun are also under 100$ at gun shows (here in the country of Texas anyways).

    When you have a bigger budget, you can move up to it's big brother - the Walther p99 - Bond's new gun. I highly recommend it.

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