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Thread: my dad picked up a nylon 66

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    Member faststang90's Avatar
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    my dad picked up a nylon 66

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    my dad got a nylon 66 that's black and chrome today from a pawn shop for 199.99 black and chrome 66.jpg
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    Sweet! They are about the lightest, reliable, high-quality, factory-made semi-auto .22 ever produced (was that enough qualifiers for everyone?). The last few used ones I saw in gun shops around here were selling in the $400 range. Seriously. Even beat-up examples were worth $350 or more, and they were actually selling at those prices.

    I won't bore everyone with my tales of buying those at garage/rummage sales for $50-$60 in my youth, cleaning them up, using them for a year or so, and then selling them for around $100.

    Whoops -- too late...
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

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    Member faststang90's Avatar
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    mines the one on the top.


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    A matched pair! VERY nice!

    If you have some previous experience with this model, I guess I probably don't have to warn you about the challenge of detail-stripping and reassembling a Nylon 66? Summary: a real pain.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

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    Member faststang90's Avatar
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    mine is the seneca green and his is black. I took his apart tonight and cleaned it. its just 2 screws on the side and one on the bottom bolt. I think they are easy to take apart and clean. the first time I did it I watch youtube to see how to do it.

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    Member Scorpion8's Avatar
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    That's a great price. The black-stock-silver-chrome-receiver versions were marked "AB" for Apache Black. Back in the day when it was okay to use American Indian names. I absolutely love my Nylon 66 and the thing is a blast to shoot all-day-long.

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    Quote Originally Posted by faststang90 View Post
    mine is the seneca green and his is black. I took his apart tonight and cleaned it. its just 2 screws on the side and one on the bottom bolt. I think they are easy to take apart and clean. the first time I did it I watch youtube to see how to do it.
    Yes, field-strip is easy (receiver cover, bolt, and barrel, IIRC). Detail-strip is when you take everything out of the action, including the little pins and springs and such. Not recommended. Pain in the butt to reassemble after detail-stripping. Only reason I did it was to "clean up" the sear surface, in hopes of improving the trigger. Didn't help, all for naught.
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    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

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    Member faststang90's Avatar
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    we took it to the gun range today to make sure it worked and it did have a problem the first set of ammo. it worked great after that one time.

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    I saw two Remington nylon 66's at a gun show last weekend. I spotted them at 9:00 when the show opened, made a quick trip around the tables on the outside walls (25-30 minutes) and when I got back to where they were at earlier...they had disappeared. They both sold almost instantaneously. The vendor said he came down a bit on them (one guy bought both) and he had them priced at $400.00 each. Are they collectable now?

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    I don't think they are collectible. I have several of them, including the ones made in Brazil,,, after , I understand, Remington shipped the tooling there because it was wearing out.???? At best, it's a serviceable gun, accuracy is only fair,. I don't remember what they were brand new.,, bought all mine used several years ago for less than $100 each.
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    Senior Member Bisley's Avatar
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    I never got to shoot one, but I wanted one bad, when I was a kid. They did a publicity stunt demonstration of a guy shooting something like 2000 thrown 2x2 wooden blocks with only three misses. All the sporting magazines had pictures of the guy sitting on the pile of blocks, holding the rifle.

    Edit:

    Apparently, I mis-remembered this event. Here's what Wikipedia says:

    Tom Frye[edit]

    In 1959, champion Tom Frye of Remington Arms Company broke Ad Topperwein's aerial shooting record for shooting 2 inch cubes of wood thrown in to the air. He managed to hit 100,004 of the 100,010 wooden blocks - using several Remington Nylon 66 semi-automatic .22 Long Rifle rifles - over a period of 14 straight days. However although the same size of target was used, the comparison to Topperwein's record is disputed because of the test conditions. Firstly the shooting was undertaken in distances less than the regulation 30 ft (9.1 m). Secondly Frye's thrower tossed the target blocks over his shoulder along the line of sight of the gun. In contrast Topperwein's thrower stood beyond the regulation distance tossing the blocks vertically into the air.[5] In 1963, he had a run of 800 straight clay singles in trap shooting.[6][7]

    John Huffer[edit]

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    Senior Member SailDesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bisley View Post
    I never got to shoot one, but I wanted one bad, when I was a kid. They did a publicity stunt demonstration of a guy shooting something like 2000 thrown 2x2 wooden blocks with only three misses. All the sporting magazines had pictures of the guy sitting on the pile of blocks, holding the rifle.
    I remember that. Impressive.
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    Senior Member Bisley's Avatar
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    I edited that post, above.

    I also wanted a Hi-Standard Double-Nine revolver, a few years later, and even saved my lawn-mowing money to buy one. But my dad said I was too young, and talked me into buying a Mossberg shotgun with the money. But I ran across a nice one a few years ago and bought it for a great price - $200. It cost about $65 when I tried to buy it the first time.
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    Senior Member SailDesign's Avatar
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    I remember looking longingly at a Ruger Single-Six back in '86 or so.... Finally bought one a month ago - some price difference!
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    Senior Member Bisley's Avatar
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    The Double-Nine I wanted was a plain-Jane blued model, which were selling for $300 when I bought this nickel plated one with fake pearl grips. I'm not crazy about fake pearl, but I was awed by it at the time. A friend offered this one to me for $100. I offered him $300 for this one, but he would only take $200.

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    Senior Member SailDesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bisley View Post
    The Double-Nine I wanted was a plain-Jane blued model, which were selling for $300 when I bought this nickel plated one with fake pearl grips. I'm not crazy about fake pearl, but I was awed by it at the time. A friend offered this one to me for $100. I offered him $300 for this one, but he would only take $200.

    Right purty!

    Know what you mean about the fake pearl, but as long as it shoots OK those can be changed out sometime, I assume.
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  17. #17
    Member faststang90's Avatar
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    yeah I have found a few nylon 66's at pawn shops. I been looking for a nylon 77 but I have not found any of them.

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    I had the Seneca Green Nylon 66 back when I was a kid. Bought it new, with paper route money, I think it was about $60. I really hated the sights on it and eventually sold it and bought a Ruger 10/22 right about the time that they came out. I see the Nylon 66s at the gun shows pretty regularly, but never had a need to own another. I'm glad that they are appreciated, they are a neat looking gun.

  19. #19
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    For a short while, Remington made a whole series of Nylon .22 rifles, including a lever action (model 76) and several bolt-action models (models 10, 11, and 12). The detachable-magazine-fed model 77 was also sold as the model 10C, and I bought one of those used in the late 1980s. It worked fine for a while, then it started to mis-feed almost every shot. I think the magazine guide had gotten bent while hunting, and the magazine was no longer int he correct position to feed the rounds into the chamber. I was complaining about it to a friend, and he offered to buy it for a repair project in his gunsmith course, so I let it go cheap.

    I generally prefer detachable magazine .22 rifles over tube magazine rifles, but in the case of the Nylon 66 vs Nylon 77, I think the tube version is the way to go.

    More info at the link below, if anyone wants to read-up and see some old photos:
    Link>>> Remington (Rem.) Nylon .22 Rifles; Nylon 66, 76, 77, 10, 11, 12
    You can also run a search by model number (use "Nylon 76 rifle" for the lever-action) to see more photos.

    I think they were cool guns, just ahead of their time.
    I'd probably still buy a bolt-action version if I found one at a reasonable price.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

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    I agree the Remington nylon 66 is a great gun....they are getting harder to find. If you can find one....buy it, the re-sale is only going to go up. I just put mine to the back of my safe and hang on to it....still fun to shoot!!

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