Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    SuckLead's Avatar
    SuckLead is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,353

    Question Refinishing Blemishes

    Hey all. I've finally begun work on my poor little .22. He's been completely sanded down, I filled in some gashes, and his first coat of stain has been applied.

    Here's the problem. The stuff I used to fill in the deep gashes and rotted areas was suppossed to be stainable. It even matched the wood. You couldn't tell it was there once I sanded it down flush. But I put the stain on tonight and it doesn't appear it wants to stain.





    What do you think? Is it something a few more coats of stain will cover or should I learn to live with it? It does need at least one more coat anyway, possibly two coats. Is it something the oil or wax will hide better? Any thoughts appreciated.

  2. #2
    neophyte is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    CLT, NC
    Posts
    513

    blending

    SuckLead: Ma'am; stating the obvious first: you have dis-similar products.
    Wood being the softer, filler the harder.
    Two different ways: 1. sanding sealer 2. blending
    Should you use the 1. sanding sealer; it will raise the grain and you will have to sand it smooth; maybe 2 coats. [no condescending statements from me]
    just follow along.
    Sanding sealer will fill all the grain; will dry relatively quickly; re' sand; recoat
    re' sand. The wood will now be slick as all get out. Hard flexible product this 'sanding sealer' The 'blonde' coloring will now commence. Oil stain or water color? Oil will get you started better i.e. toward your goal; color, and preservation.
    Staining will be entirely different compared to bare wood. wipe, sponge, rag, what-ever to get the stain on wood. Allow stain to sit approx. 3-5 minutes; wipe to coloring subjectivity. Doesn't suite you. Recolor after 8-12 hours. Blending with a rag. allow 24-48 hours to dry; use urethane to top coat. Coat lightly; allow a tackie surface; re-coat. Spray bomb will be fine.
    Allow 24 hrs. and maybe recoat.

    2. Blending; make surface wet with stain; allow 3-5 minuets sitting; use soft stroke ragging; end to end. use deliberate strokes. you should be able to find the pressure angle that you need. Maybe several coatings. Re-coat with urethane spray. Several coats. Hard and durable flexible.

    Personally: I'd use the sanding sealer method

    let us know with pictures what you did.

  3. #3
    SuckLead's Avatar
    SuckLead is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,353
    Well, the issues were fixed and the staining is complete. I'll be letting it sit for a solid 24 hours before the next step. Here's how he looks now:











    I decided to embrace the gashes. The hole was filled in with dust from the sanding, so it does have some filler left in it. But the gash you see in the photos was completely unfilled. It isn't deep enough to hold the dust, so we're letting some flaws stay on the stock.

  4. #4
    SAS MAYHEM's Avatar
    SAS MAYHEM is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Rocky Mount NC
    Posts
    151

    Wink

    Sucklead, looks good show us a pic when its done please.

  5. #5
    SuckLead's Avatar
    SuckLead is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,353
    I will. I haven't had any time to work on it past where it was in the above photos. I'm hoping in the next week or two. I need to find someplace to actually hang the stock while it dries in that phase, though.

  6. #6
    GURU1911 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    SEALY, TX.
    Posts
    126

    Wood stock repair help

    Repairing dents & deep scratches in wood stocks is no big deal once you know the secret. The defective area must be "steamed" to raise the dent. Steaming will cause the wood fibers to swell up, thus lifting the crushed fibers. Here is how you do this:
    1. Turn on your electric steam iron & set the control to "hot" & allow it a few minutes to preheat.
    2. Get a clean terry cloth washrag, wet with water, & wring out all the water you can.
    3. Place cloth over the defect, apply hot steam iron to cloth, move in a circular manner until steam begins to rise off the rag.
    4. Remove rag & visually inspect the area to be repaired. Keep rag damp & repeat the process until the dent is raised flush with the surrounding wood.
    5. Dry area with a hair dryer set on high. Feel area with fingers & you will feel the wood "whiskers". Sand area with 220 grit wood paper. Continue to steam, dry, & sand until the wood fibers stop "whiskering"
    6. Sand with progressively finer papers until the final finish with 4-0 steel wool.
    7. Apply finish of your choice. Allow each coat to dry completely, lightly scuff with the steel wool, & apply additional coats of finish and steel wool until the wood grain can no longer be felt with your fingers.
    8. Apply 2 coats of johnson's old fashion paste wax to stock. Allow to dry to haze, & then buff with clean towel.
    9. Pat yo-self on the back for a job well done.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

how to fill sanding blemishes in wood

,

how to stain wood with a sanding blemish

,

refinished stock blemish

Click on a term to search for related topics.