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  1. #1
    snookie is offline Junior Member
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    Full size SIS thumb safety snapped in half.

    My new full size SIS thumb safety snapped in half the second time I took it to the range. i had not bought Kibmers in a while because i did not trust the quality of their small parts. But i like the SIS series so much I took a chance. Now I feel like I need to get all the MIM replaced. Thats annoying. Fortunately i know a very good gunsmith who does alot of this kind of work. He even sells new Kimbers and replaces all the MIM out of the box for customers.

  2. #2
    Baldy's Avatar
    Baldy is offline Senior Member
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    Well that sure would ruin your day. Glad you know a good shith as they are worth their weight in gold. Good luck.

  3. #3
    submoa is offline Member
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    Get him to lose the Swartz safety while he's at it.

  4. #4
    2006sporty is offline Junior Member
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    Cool Sis

    I also just got my SIS45.Only got about 100 rds thru it...Let me know how yours turns out.Mine seems to be very accurate.

  5. #5
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is online now HGF Forum Moderator
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    The MIM issue is a hotbed issue. Personally, MIM never bothered me. That being said - MIM parts that Kimber use tend to have more problems than MIM parts that other brands use. I don't read near the complaints about breakage problems in Springfields that have MIM parts as I do about the Kimbers....

  6. #6
    2006sporty is offline Junior Member
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    What the heck is MIM

  7. #7
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    MIM: "Metal Injection Molding."

    Sintered (finely powdered) metal, in a liquidous matrix, I believe, is injected into a ceramic mold that is a negative image of the desired part. Heat and pressure are applied, until the sintered metal fuses into the desired part, the liquid fraction acting as a flux. Then the mold is broken open to remove the finished part.
    MIM results in a fully finished part, except for a few mold sprues. It does away with most finishing operations, except perhaps final polishing.

    The ceramic mold is formed around a wax model of the finished part by merely dipping the wax part into a tub of liquidous clay several times and then letting it dry.
    The ceramic clay is fired (hardened) in a kiln, where the wax melts out leaving a negative image of the desired part.

    The wax model is cast from hot, molten wax poured into a flexible, permanent, silicone-rubber mold that was formed (by dipping) around a model part made by a machinist or mold-maker.

  8. #8
    Concealed45_1911's Avatar
    Concealed45_1911 is offline Junior Member
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    Can I get a more thorough explination Steve ????

  9. #9
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Concealed45_1911 View Post
    Can I get a more thorough explination Steve ????
    Yeah. I just sent you a 256-page PM, complete with footnotes and bibliography.
    Tell me if it doesn't come through OK.

  10. #10
    submoa is offline Member
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    Actually, in the MIM process, a mold is made from steel. Then powdered metal is mixed with a plastic binder. This mixture is then injected into the mold under heat and high pressure to form the part.

    There are 2 reasons why MIM is inherently weaker than even cast:

    The presence of plastic in the mixture results in voids. Essentially the finished part is made of metal "foam."

    In cheaper manufacturing processes, the mixture of metal and binder is not uniform. Areas of high plastic concentration in the mixture produce a 'bubble' that short of xray cannot be seen in a finished part.

    Manufacturers like MIM as it results in a finished product requiring no further machining (no added labor) and allows tighter tolerances in the finished gun. MIM guns look good but are not made for the long haul.

    The method described by STEVE1911 is actually known as Metal Investment Casting or the lost wax process. Additional machining is required after the part leaves the mold. Most metal receivers are made this way (ie, Caspian).

  11. #11
    2006sporty is offline Junior Member
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    Sis Mim

    Thanks I'm a toolmaker and,have not ran across that abbreavation before. I am also new to handguns.....My SIS seems to be of great quality.

  12. #12
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    The staff gunsmith at Gunsite recommends replacing all MIM parts on serious pistols. They break regularly in the 1000+ round courses at Gunsite.

    While none of the Kimbers in the 250 class I just took actually broke any parts, all of them malfunctioned repeatedly during the course.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  13. #13
    2006sporty is offline Junior Member
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    Replacment parts

    I would like to do all my own work if possible....What should be replaced and, where can I get the best quility parts?

  14. #14
    submoa is offline Member
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    I suggest replacing the barrel bushing, firing pin stop, slide stop, extractor, hammer and sear on Kimbers for better reliability with either tool steel or billet.

    Good parts are available from Ed Brown, Wilson Combat, etc.

    Carryguns used to have a complete reliability kit for Kimbers with all these parts. I like their ignition kit.

    I like AFTEC extractors as they maintain tension better than standard designs over long use.

    If you really want to get serious, replace all the pins with EGW's drill rod pin kit.

    Actual selection of parts will be dependent on your personal preferences for your gun.


    This is not a project for the faint hearted. At the end of the day you will have added $100s of parts and will still be left with a $1,000 gun. Your best bet is to just replace the broken part, sell the Kimber and just buy a gun with no MIM or FPB to start off with (Dan Wesson Pointman 7 starts at about $1k).

  15. #15
    bill5074 is offline Member
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    You guys are making me nervous. I have a kimber Ultra CDP II and have not had any problems after about 600 rounds. Are all the parts Submoa was talking about MIM on the Kimbers?? This is the first I have heard of this, and am now having second thoughts. I have had other Kimbers and have had no problems. Should i get rid of the Kimber and replace it with something else?? Thanks for any feedback.

  16. #16
    submoa is offline Member
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    Yes, all the parts are MIM.

    Depending on your use, you can simply use it until a part breaks and carry on. And you might get several thousand rounds use between part breakage.

    One other dubious part of Kimbers is their Series II Firing Pin Block. This uses a pin that pushes up a plunger in the slide when the grip safety is engaged. Aside from the fact Swartz's are sensitive to grip safety alignment, this MIM pin will shear if you have the grip safety engaged when you pull off the slide. Unless you have previously removed the FPB, your Kimber will be inert with a broken Swartz pin.

    See my thread for more details on FPBs and MIM: Why I'm not a fan of these 1911s: Colt, Para, SIG, Kimber, S&W

    What folks often forget is that while 1911s are great guns when tuned and working right, they are also high maintenance... Just like hot women

    The following maintenance schedule is quoted directly from the Wilson Combat 1911 Auto Maintenance Manual by Bill Wilson.

    Clean and Lube, Routine:

    Lead bullet use every 300-500 rounds

    Jacketed bullet use every 500-700 rounds

    Carry pistols once a month

    Clean and Lube, Thorough:

    Every 5,000 rounds and/or every 3 months your pistol should be completely disassembled, cleaned and lubricated.

    Spring Replacement:

    Recoil spring every 2,000 rounds

    Firing pin spring every 5,000 rounds

    Hammer spring every 25,000 rounds

    Parts Replacement:

    Firing pin stop: when cracked

    Slide stop: when broken

    Extractor: when hook edges become worn or fails to maintain tension

  17. #17
    ttomp is offline Junior Member
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    is it under warranty?

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