Results 1 to 15 of 15
Like Tree12Likes
  • 5 Post By TAPnRACK
  • 1 Post By pic
  • 1 Post By SouthernBoy
  • 1 Post By SouthernBoy
  • 1 Post By Steve M1911A1
  • 2 Post By goldwing
  • 1 Post By Bisley

Thread: Hunting party, safety on, let's move...

  1. #1
    pic
    pic is offline
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,627

    Hunting party, safety on, let's move...

    123
    When we went hunting in groups of two or more , we would always make sure safety was most important
    Before setting out through the field we would verbally command check for safety on.
    After a potential , or actual encounter with the wild game we were hunting, we would check once again verbally to go back to safety mode. Check your fire arm.. Sometimes just a certain amount of time would pass and anybody in the group could call for a safety check.
    Safety was the priority.
    i notice nowadays there is a strong encouragement toward single action engaged without a safety concerns.
    Guns are unforgiving, and I'm just surprised more emphasis is not placed upon how important safety is.

    To recommend a handgun to a newbie , striker fired, no safety , is not how I was trained. Safety always comes first!!
    The excuse of forgetting to disengage a safety, does not cut it. Training is essential .

  2. #2
    Senior Member TAPnRACK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,521
    I think a lot of people see the single weight trigger pull to be easier for newer shooters. I learned on the Beretta 92 and many years later started using Glocks and M&P's. I honestly think using a DA/SA helped me become a better shooter and I learned more about trigger control. The long, heavy DA pull acted as a safety of sorts... it is double the weight of most modern striker fired pistols.

    Today's striker fired handguns are safe... as long as safety rules are ingrained into the shooter. None of my guns have safeties... I like decocker models. I currently shoot mostly striker fired pistols... they are safe as long as one understands the basic:

    *Treat every gun as if it's loaded

    *Finger off the trigger until your ready to fire.

    *Don't point the weapon at anything you don't wish to destroy.

    *Know your intended target (Positive ID) and what is beyond.

    If all these rules are followed, I see no issue with a new user learning on a striker fired, no safety type gun. Most ND's occur due to user error or lapse in following the cardinal rules of firearms safety outlined above. Owning a firearm is a big responsibility... carrying one open or concealed is an even greater one. If you are uncomfortable with guns or lack the training needed to carry or own one... that person should seek such training. Unfortunately for some, denial or lack of knowledge presents a danger for themselves or others.
    pic, Steve M1911A1, Bisley and 2 others like this.

  3. #3
    pic
    pic is offline
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,627
    I agree, but what defines a new shooter?
    I have no doubt there are new shooters who will go above and beyond to master that gun .
    Then there are new shooters who may just be unteachable . Would I recommend a Glock to a newbie who can't get it.
    It's hard to judge one's skill set or potential skill set without a personal hands on evaluation.
    So when I hear recommendations to go buy a Glock to a newbie , I disagree.
    Start off with a revolver or a lever action rifle, lol.
    Steve M1911A1 likes this.

  4. #4
    pic
    pic is offline
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,627
    I have a friend who bought a gun and didn't know how the bullet went from the mag and into the chamber?
    And he had his pistol permit for ten years.

  5. #5
    Senior Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Western Prince William County, Va
    Posts
    3,776
    Quote Originally Posted by pic View Post
    I have a friend who bought a gun and didn't know how the bullet went from the mag and into the chamber?
    And he had his pistol permit for ten years.
    Now that is truly sad. I know folks who know the minimum about their firearms. I have a good friend who is a neighbor who happens to fit this mold. I have tried on a number of occasions to help him along but he seems to be somewhat immune from learning certain aspects of gun handling. He is a good man so there is hope. And yes, I do take him to the range from time to time.

    When I first got into the world of handguns, I totally immersed myself in the mechanics and logic of firearms; how they operated, how they worked compared to their competitors, and the differences between the various design philosophies. Granted I am mechanically inclined but there is a concept of logic which not only should but needs to be applied to these tools.

    I love these things and am so grateful that I live in a state where I can buy and own them pretty much no different than buying and owning a candy bar. Add to that the freedom of leaving my home with a firearm strapped to my hip and you have what I call liberty. Now if we can just get rid of that annoyance of having to obtain a permit to conceal the darned thing.
    pic likes this.

  6. #6
    Senior Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Western Prince William County, Va
    Posts
    3,776
    Quote Originally Posted by pic View Post
    When we went hunting in groups of two or more , we would always make sure safety was most important
    Before setting out through the field we would verbally command check for safety on.
    After a potential , or actual encounter with the wild game we were hunting, we would check once again verbally to go back to safety mode. Check your fire arm.. Sometimes just a certain amount of time would pass and anybody in the group could call for a safety check.
    Safety was the priority.
    i notice nowadays there is a strong encouragement toward single action engaged without a safety concerns.
    Guns are unforgiving, and I'm just surprised more emphasis is not placed upon how important safety is.

    To recommend a handgun to a newbie , striker fired, no safety , is not how I was trained. Safety always comes first!!
    The excuse of forgetting to disengage a safety, does not cut it. Training is essential .
    For my guns I use in the field, I don't mind a safety at all. For my carry guns, I definitely do NOT want an externally settable safety.
    pic likes this.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    39
    Bolt open or closed when not hunting?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bisley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    2,019
    Quote Originally Posted by pic View Post
    ...Start off with a revolver or a lever action rifle, lol.
    Safety-wise, I see no real difference between drawing and firing a DA revolver, or drawing and firing a Glock. Please clarify.

  9. #9
    Member BigCityChief's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    606
    Quote Originally Posted by pic View Post
    I have a friend who bought a gun and didn't know how the bullet went from the mag and into the chamber?
    And he had his pistol permit for ten years.
    That, my friend, is frightening.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    6,769
    Quote Originally Posted by Bisley View Post
    Safety-wise, I see no real difference between drawing and firing a DA revolver, or drawing and firing a Glock. Please clarify.
    Generally speaking, a DA revolver's trigger is more difficult to pull in DA mode, than is a Glock's trigger.
    This has two components: The revolver's trigger normally presents more resistance to the trigger-finger, and the revolver's trigger has to move much further to fire a shot.
    denner likes this.

  11. #11
    Senior Member goldwing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,278
    <SNIP>
    Start off with a revolver or a lever action rifle, lol.
    [/QUOTE]

    I think that a lever action tube magazine fed rifle is not a great choice for a beginner. I say this because they can only be unloaded by shooting until empty or cycling each round through the chamber. This unloading operation usually takes place where others have gathered, like at camp or near the vehicle that the crew is riding in.
    GW

  12. #12
    pic
    pic is offline
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,627
    Quote Originally Posted by Bisley View Post
    Safety-wise, I see no real difference between drawing and firing a DA revolver, or drawing and firing a Glock. Please clarify.


    Once you have drawn the gun ,ready to fire , there is not much of a difference between a revolver except the longer trigger pull in DA.

    When holstered iwb, owb, with a revolver , you could actually reach into the holster and you will not be able to pull that trigger.

    The rotation of the revolvers cylinder in the holster plus depending on the type of hammer just will not allow it ,,,,Or it will increase the trigger pull significantly

    A striker fired pistol holstered will go bang with the same lb trigger pull.

    I'm just implying that there is a difference .
    I own strikers , revolvers , love em all

  13. #13
    pic
    pic is offline
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,627
    Quote Originally Posted by goldwing View Post
    <SNIP>
    Start off with a revolver or a lever action rifle, lol.
    I think that a lever action tube magazine fed rifle is not a great choice for a beginner. I say this because they can only be unloaded by shooting until empty or cycling each round through the chamber. This unloading operation usually takes place where others have gathered, like at camp or near the vehicle that the crew is riding in.
    GW[/QUOTE]


    Good point, I guess it would depend on the beginners knowledge and developed skill set.

    That's why hunting in parties Was not my cup of tea. I did not trust a stranger with a loaded firearm. But that's just me.

    Loaded or unloaded. Chamber open or closed.

    DO NOT POINT THAT GUN IN MY DIRECTION OR EVEN SWING IT PAST ME.
    When this does happen and it will. You speak up in a professional manner . Please is a good starting word

  14. #14
    Senior Member goldwing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,278
    Pic, I may be a bit more leery of the lever guns than some. A guy that we had hunted with before brought his young son equipped with a Winchester 30-30.

    His first mistake was while following me down a narrow trail he had the muzzle trained on my back like he was taking me prisoner. I got a weird feeling and looked over my shoulder to see what he was doing and immediately relieved him of the gun. A couple of minutes later I handed it over to his dad and told him why I was carrying it.

    After a thorough butt chewing the kid was allowed to continue hunting. I put some distance between myself and a bad situation and concentrated on Whitetails.

    Flash forward to sundown the kid had an accidental discharge while unloading the gun. Nobody got hurt, I never hunted with that group again.
    GW
    pic and Steve M1911A1 like this.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Bisley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    2,019
    Maybe I should have said, "correctly drawing and firing." I will concede that it might be easier to shoot a Glock inside its holster. But a person who does that is ignoring the most important rule of gun handling, just like all of the other people who have negligent discharges that injure someone. That being the case, who is to say whether that the same person (who would pull the trigger on a holstered gun) might also flip a lever safety off, before drawing?

    Personally, I believe that any responsible person can carry, draw and shoot any type of handgun without injuring himself or others, if he does the necessary safety training. We all have our personal preferences, but it doesn't change the rule about keeping your finger away from the trigger.
    Steve M1911A1 likes this.

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •