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  1. #1
    nukehayes's Avatar
    nukehayes is offline Member
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    First time Pheasant hunting

    Well, my buds and I are gonna go Pheasant hunting this weekend and I've never been. We don't have any bird dogs so we figured we would just line up at 10-15 yd intervals and walk across the field. I'm not worried about hitting one, I've shot trap, skeet, and sporting clays for years, but I am concerned with techniques for flushing a bird with just people. I have all my appropriate licensing and attire, I just need some advice for a first time pheasant hunter. Any and all tips are greatly appreciated. Hopefully if it is successful I will have some pics up after this weekend. This isn't opening weekend by the way, its the second weekend, I was reading that the birds get pretty smart as the season progresses.

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  3. #2
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is online now HGF Forum Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by nukehayes View Post
    Well, my buds and I are gonna go Pheasant hunting this weekend and I've never been. We don't have any bird dogs so we figured we would just line up at 10-15 yd intervals and walk across the field.
    That's one of the more popular ways pheasants have been hunted for decades. It may not work as well as you'd like if the birds in your area are hunted hard and regularly, but you CAN get birds using that method. Watch the spacing of the hunters; if they get too far apart, the birds will double-back by running between them.
    I have all my appropriate licensing and attire, I just need some advice for a first time pheasant hunter. Any and all tips are greatly appreciated.
    When using this method of hunting, well-mannered hunters will make sure they only shoot at birds rising in the narrow angle almost directly in front of themselves. Shooting way right or left is considered engaging/taking a bird in another hunter's "zone" (unless you are on one of the ends of the line), and is poor hunting etiquette in most groups. Watch your muzzle and the line of hunters; don't get too far in front (a youngster problem in most cases), too far behind (you'll endanger others if you shoot from this position), or swing your muzzle across the line (hunters in the middle should carry their guns pointing almost straight up). Many groups prohibit shooting at a running/flying bird if it breaks behind the line, or moves back toward the hunters (too easy to shoot a buddy when you're swinging across the line or spinning around while concentrating on the bird). Keep the location of parked vehicles in mind as you walk/shoot, too. You won't win any popularity contests by peppering someone's expensive SUV with birdshot. Some groups encourage being very verbal/noisy; talking and calling out as they walk (both to spook the birds and to keep track of each other in tall brush and/or crops like corn), and calling out "Rooster" when someone flushes a shootable bird or "Hen" if it's not. Other groups are more subdued. Take your cue from those around you, or the hunt "elders" if there are any.
    Hopefully if it is successful I will have some pics up after this weekend. This isn't opening weekend by the way, its the second weekend, I was reading that the birds get pretty smart as the season progresses.
    Good luck!

  4. #3
    DGreenplate's Avatar
    DGreenplate is offline Junior Member
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    They run

    I've hunted pheasant with both dogs and no dogs. The only problem with not having a dog is that if they have room to run they will. The dogs can force them to fly. Or if you can get them to the end of a row of cover where they would have to run in the open then they'll fly. But you may still have to send someone up to jump them so don't shoot till the bird or person is clear. Be safe.
    Dave G.

  5. #4
    tekhead1219's Avatar
    tekhead1219 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DGreenplate View Post
    I've hunted pheasant with both dogs and no dogs. The only problem with not having a dog is that if they have room to run they will. The dogs can force them to fly. Or if you can get them to the end of a row of cover where they would have to run in the open then they'll fly. But you may still have to send someone up to jump them so don't shoot till the bird or person is clear. Be safe.
    Dave G.
    Very true. I've spent many a bird season both with and without a dog. Advantage is with a dog because it forces the bird to flush, but, hunting without a dog is great also. First time? Get ready for a rocking good time. There is no other feeling than having that big ole bird flush in front of you, the sound of the wings as they beat, it's great. Best thing is they flush in front of you. Quail wait until you're right in the middle of them when they flush. Can scare the bejesus out of ya. Have a great time, be safe, always pick your target and know where your fellow hunters are.

  6. #5
    DarrylS's Avatar
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    ...First time huntin' pheasants huh??...Don't ferget a few "Depends"...Yer gonna need 'em if you've never had one "slowly, quietly and gently rise" before yer face when ya flush it...


  7. #6
    hucklebery is offline Junior Member
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    Probably a little late, but this tech. works much better with blockers. You must be a bit more cautious of your muzzle direction but will help hold the birds more. Put a couple guys with vehicles at the end of the field. The last 30 yards of the field will be a blast. If the field holds alot of birds, most will get up in this area and will usually rise to a safe shot. If snow on the ground you can almost hunt by yourself.

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