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Thread: H&k p7

  1. #1
    mitzymitzy is offline Junior Member
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    H&k p7

    I find the P7 an interesting pistol. There are many for sale and all different prices. Is there a particular model that would be a good investment.

  2. #2
    rex
    rex is offline Senior Member
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    Any of them are because they're discontinued but parts are still available.Where it's made depends to collectors and that can vary but there are some runs that pull a premium.Search the HKPRO forum and you'll have days of reading to learn about them.Very cool piece but I only played with one once.Being gas operated I will tell you do not grab the slide after 1/2 a box or so,that's why there's a heat sheild above your trigger finger.The M13s seem to have had a price jump lately.

  3. #3
    ZeusApolloPatrol is offline Junior Member
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    There are different P7 models. The P7 is usually the cheapest and was the earliest model. It has the European heel mag release and is a great ccw gun. A lot of them are German police trade ins. Finding a P7 in excellent shape is hard, and pricy. Then there is the P7M8. It is nearly identical to the P7 except it has a more American mag release and a heat shield in the trigger guard. Both the P7 and the M8 hold 8+1 rds in 9mm. The P7M13 is a larger capacity model of the P7M8. It holds 13 rds and is much fatter than the M8. They stopped making M13's in 1994 so they are more sought after. They made M8's until 2008ish. But they are still very desirable and most users favorite of the group.
    As far as what models are more desirable than others. With the M8 and M13 it has to do with where HK HQ was at the time. Chantilly, Sterling, and Trussville. In that order. Chantillys are most sought. This is when HK had the best assemblers working the guns and most P7 experts feel these models exhibit HK quality at its finest. However I personally have never had much issue with any P7 model. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    mitzymitzy is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for all the info

  5. #5
    Blkhawk73's Avatar
    Blkhawk73 is offline Member
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    For an investment, you gotta find that needle in a haystack example that is priced below the norm and in excellent condition. A complete package - is BIG plus as well. These deals are indeed few and far between but they do exist. Just a matter of being in the right place at the right time. It's how I got both of mine.

  6. #6
    30Rock is offline Junior Member
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    "Interesting pistol" to say the least. There is nothing like it. Especially now that they are discontinued. It is one of my all time favorites... HOWEVER... being a realist and and every day carrier of a handgun.... I may be looking to sell mine in the future. Where I live, in the Communist state of NJ, if you are involved in an off-duty shooting and it turns fatal, that handgun is lost to evidence....forever. As much as I love my P7M8, I don't want to lose it to that set of circumstances. I don't like having handguns I can't use laying around and I'm in the market for a carbine and may trade up... Anyone have similar thoughts or concerns?

  7. #7
    flugzeug is offline Junior Member
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    The P7 is part of the H&K history when they made handguns that set future trends. The VP70Z was the real first polymer framed high capacity, 18rd futuristic handgun. The only problem was the double action only, very heavy trigger pull.
    The P9S, partial plastic frame with polygonal rifling. Made in .45 acp and 9mm, I've never shot a more accurate handgun.
    The P7 was simply revolutionary. Not just because of the polygonal barrel, but imagine the natural action on squeezing the grip to bring it into action. And all of this was done in the 70's. Even though it was less popular, I bought a new one with the heel release.
    Amazing gun.

  8. #8
    berettatoter's Avatar
    berettatoter is offline Senior Member
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    The P7 is not a very common gun around gun stores, but occasionally they do turn up. I have seen more at gun shows than at gun stores. They are a really cool pistol.

  9. #9
    ronin11 is offline Junior Member
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    http://i1312.photobucket.com/albums/...ps10a61426.jpg

    just picked this one up a couple of weeks ago, a little honest holster wear, night sights, 3 mags, box, manual & cleaning equipment...super sweet shooter, I had some time getting familiar with it (read, watched reviews, field stripped and cleaned it) before I shot it, but once i understood the handling characteristics, it was a pleasure to shoot. It did get warm after multiple magizines through it in a short period of time, but it was still an enjoyable experience...

  10. #10
    BingoFuel is offline Junior Member
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    Well done (below). I'll only add that there are two more (far more obscure) models to add to the P7 family:
    The P7M10 was a variant of the 9mm design chambered in 40S&W. It had a disproportionately heavy slide to handle the recoil of the larger round, is quite heavy and generally wasn't seen as a success compared to the 9mm models. I've searched for one to own but they are very pricey as there were relatively few made;
    The P7K3 might be the most obscure and valuable in that it was a multi-caliber model of the same design. It had barrels and mags for .22LR, .32 ACP and .380 ACP. They are considered true collectibles and one is on my list of must-have-some-day.
    BTW, the M7M13 was my first handgun 20 years ago because of it's ambi design and it's very safe operational design. I doubt you'll find a handgun that is superior in most regards to a P7.
    B

    Quote Originally Posted by ZeusApolloPatrol View Post
    There are different P7 models. The P7 is usually the cheapest and was the earliest model. It has the European heel mag release and is a great ccw gun. A lot of them are German police trade ins. Finding a P7 in excellent shape is hard, and pricy. Then there is the P7M8. It is nearly identical to the P7 except it has a more American mag release and a heat shield in the trigger guard. Both the P7 and the M8 hold 8+1 rds in 9mm. The P7M13 is a larger capacity model of the P7M8. It holds 13 rds and is much fatter than the M8. They stopped making M13's in 1994 so they are more sought after. They made M8's until 2008ish. But they are still very desirable and most users favorite of the group.
    As far as what models are more desirable than others. With the M8 and M13 it has to do with where HK HQ was at the time. Chantilly, Sterling, and Trussville. In that order. Chantillys are most sought. This is when HK had the best assemblers working the guns and most P7 experts feel these models exhibit HK quality at its finest. However I personally have never had much issue with any P7 model. Hope this helps.

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