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  1. #1
    victor2525 is offline Junior Member
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    Looking for help

    Hi All,
    I'm a new member to this forum. I recently purchased a S&W revolver and need help to identify its year of manufacture and model. The revolver was used by the canadian military police about 1942. The barrel length is 6" or 152mm. The ammunition is .38. The serial # is 732248.
    Another # on the barrel is "CTG". Also I presume it will fire .38 special bullets.
    Thanks in advance for any help.

    Victor2525

  2. #2
    silver03gt is offline Junior Member
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    Looking for help

    Welcome to the forum.

  3. #3
    chessail77's Avatar
    chessail77 is offline Senior Member
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    HI and welcome

  4. #4
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by victor2525 View Post
    Hi All,
    I'm a new member to this forum. I recently purchased a S&W revolver and need help to identify its year of manufacture and model. The revolver was used by the canadian military police about 1942. The barrel length is 6" or 152mm. The ammunition is .38. The serial # is 732248.
    Another # on the barrel is "CTG". Also I presume it will fire .38 special bullets.
    Thanks in advance for any help.

    Victor2525
    It's possible that your pistol was made to fire .38 S&W cartridges, not .38 Special. The .38 S&W is a shorter, weaker cartridge than the .38 Special.
    During WW2, the British (and the Commonwealth) used what they called the 0.380/200 revolver round, which is our .38 S&W. We made pistols for the British and for some Commonwealth countries, but I am not sure that ones made for use in Canada were all .38 S&W caliber.
    Evidently, after the war was over, some .38 S&W revolvers were "converted" to .38 Special by drilling-out their cylinder chambers to the longer size. This was not a safe conversion. Therefore, you should ask a competent gunsmith to check your gun for cartridge fit and function, before ever firing it.

  5. #5
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Welcome to the site!
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

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