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  1. #1
    frankbooth is offline Junior Member
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    Wink Hello, I know very little about firearms...but am desperately trying to learn.

    Here's the deal. I've been a writer for years. I mostly write screenplays. A huge part of writing is research. If there's a gun in my script, I want to research it to death, I can't write about things if I have no knowledge of them, and I can't trivialize the material by saying "it's just fiction, people don't pay that much attention." Too many writers and filmmakers insult the audience's intelligence by not paying enough attention to detail. It's as if they don't realize that cops, military personnel, gun enthusiasts, etc. also sometimes enjoy and regularly watch movies themselves. You shouldn't treat the experts like dummies. Of course with any movie there's required a little bit of suspension of disbelief, but after absorbing so much information from my friend/roommate the ex-cop, I really admire when filmmakers take the time to get things right and have good technical advisors who show the actors how to properly hold and fire a weapon, and it's really impressive when they choreograph room clearing tactics and such with care and precision. Case in point: an odd movie by the name of The Way of the Gun, starring Benicio del Toro and Ryan Phillipe, codenames Parker and Longbaugh (some of you will recognize those references). Parker and Longbaugh are scumbags, you don't know exactly what they did in their past to get where they are, but it's clear by how they handle themselves in combat situations that they are quite possibly ex-military or something similar, who turned to a life of crime after their service.

    The reason The Way of the Gun portrays gunplay so accurately (and I'm told that it does by people who have some expertise) is because it was written and directed by Christopher McQuarrie, writer of the Oscar-winning Usual Suspects (also great movie). McQuarrie's brother apparently is a Navy SEAL and was the technical advisor on set, which is why the gunplay rings true for most people who know anything about guns, and also the reason certain things confuse the hell out of people who know nothing about guns outside of what they've seen in other movies and videogames. Of course I loved it the first time I saw it, but I knew nothing, I was baffled by some of the tactics simply because they are never really shown in more conventional movies, but also because they don't bother to give a play-by-play of the action, which is another thing I admire.

    So my interest in firearms arose from my interest in film, but also from my natural curiosity and compulsion to do research on subjects of which I have little to no knowledge. I even have a book which is a "writer's guide to firearms" (I have one about poisons too, it's a whole series of books). More recently, however, my interest has progressed a little bit. I've borrowed several different guns from friends to fire under their supervision to get the basic feel of pulling a trigger which releases a projectile in hopes of hitting a target, moving or otherwise. I've recently felt the need to buy a defensive handgun myself, but don't have much money, and like I said I don't know very much at all about what's good, practical, overpriced, cheaply made, or whatever. I've asked various people, and of course everyone has their preferences, but I'm trying to get as many opinions as possible. That's the main reason I joined this forum.

    I'm a noob, and I don't want to die during a late night ATM transaction due to lack of preparation. Better to have it and not need it then to need it and not have it. Plus I don't live in the safest part of town, or the safest town for that matter.

    In short...Hello. I'm new to this, and I'll likely have a lot of dumb questions, so bear with me for the time being. Also, in the future I'll try to be more succinct with my posts. Thanks!

  2. #2
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
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    Welcome to the forum. None of us was born with all the answers, so ask away. Handguns are very subjective, in that different shooters want different things in a handgun. If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it.... Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, you can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.

    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

    Get some professional training, and shoot safely.

  3. #3
    Xris's Avatar
    Xris is offline Junior Member
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    Welcome to the forums. Do not be to concerned. You are on the right track seeing as you have read your material, borrowed firearms from friends, and are now here. Lets go back to your friends helping you out real quick. First, have they been able to assist you in there suggestions as far as familiarizing you with their types of firearms and calibers they are teaching you to shoot? Second, have they ...and this is really the most important part...have they taught you guns safety? You must understand that before anything else. When it comes to carrying a firearm you need to do several things first. You need to see what your state laws are concerning getting a permit to carry and the process required. They you need to find something that you are comfortable shooting. remember when it comes to self defense you dont need to shoot very far. Most of the time your attack is pretty close and coming towards you. Now everyone will tell you what they think the best carry is. Unfortunately no one can tell you whats best for you but you. But I will give you my suggesting on what I think eveyone would agree you should look for. Comfort[ both in your hand and where ever you decide to conceal it on your person]...then conceilability(how easy can you hide it?)... how fast you can draw from where it is located? What caliber are you most comfortable shooting? How many rounds to you feel you should carry? I suggest to get a gun with a manual safety aswell. I carry a taurus 740 slim. it has 6+1 rounds and is very comfortable to me and only cost me $375 before tax...I'll let some of the others here fill in some more info for you. good luck man. Shoot straight and shoot safe.

  4. #4
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    For starters, find and take a basic handgun class from a certified instructor. Go to a local gun shop or shooting range and ask the staff. Some places will rent or loan you a gun for the course. They will also be a good starting point for navigating your state and local laws for starting your concealed carry license process. Good training is never a bad thing.
    As for buying your first firearm, there are plenty of inexpensive but good reliable options. You don't give a price range, but a price cap of $400 +/- can get you into the game nicely. Ruger jumps to mind and there are many others. Even less $$ if you go to the used market.
    1. Take a class. Good training is never wasted money. It's probably cheaper than you think too.
    2. Figure out what type of gun will work best for your needs. Revolver or semi auto? Caliber? Read a lot and figure out what you like for your situation. If possible, go to a range that rents guns and try out some after you narrow the field a bit.
    3. Shop around. Prices vary wildly.
    4. Check in here if you have more questions. Oh, and let us know how everything goes.

  5. #5
    TedDeBearFrmHell's Avatar
    TedDeBearFrmHell is offline Senior Member
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    welcome from southern oregon

    the end

  6. #6
    Cat's Avatar
    Cat
    Cat is offline Member
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    Welcome Frankbooth,From Jax's Florida. Yes Sir knowledge is power.And commonsense.

  7. #7
    Ra's Avatar
    Ra
    Ra is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedDeBearFrmHell View Post

    the end
    Very witty!

    Welcome from East Texas, enjoy your stay.

  8. #8
    berettatoter's Avatar
    berettatoter is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by usmcj View Post
    Welcome to the forum. None of us was born with all the answers, so ask away. Handguns are very subjective, in that different shooters want different things in a handgun. If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it.... Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, you can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.

    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

    Get some professional training, and shoot safely.
    Well said. Good advice here, so listen to this post. Semper Fi!

  9. #9
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by berettatoter View Post
    Well said. Good advice here, so listen to this post. Semper Fi!
    Kind words, sir.... Semper Fi

  10. #10
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Welcome to the site! No shortage of opinions here, and facts even surface from time-to-time.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  11. #11
    jtguns's Avatar
    jtguns is offline Member
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    Welcome from Washington, and DJ is right, the trick is figuring out what is fact and fiction
    Shoot Safe, JT

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