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  1. #1
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    After brushing the slide/barrel with solvent, do you use water to wash it down?

    I usually wipe off the slide and barrel down with a clean cloth (after spraying M-Pro7 and brushing through the slide/barrel/recoil spring rod), but wondering if you guys run the slide and barrel through with faucet water to remove any other dirt? And then drying it off with a cloth?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    OD GASTON's Avatar
    OD GASTON is offline Junior Member
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    I've always used a bore cleaner, then wipe it down with CLP.Seems to do a good job.Usually not to hard to clean since I clean them EVERY time I go shooting.

  3. #3
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is online now HGF Forum Moderator
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    I personally don't think Bore Cleaner is necessary that often. I have used CLP by itself 99.99% of the time.

    I bought some borecleaner recently to try to get the copper marks off the slide of a USP I used to have. It didn't work, but I still have the stuff. The ONLY time I have to use it is on my big P99 - every once in a while, I get powder marks on the side of the hard chromed slide that will not come off without it.

    That's all I use it for....

    I've done fine all these years w/o it

  4. #4
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    I cringe at the thought of scrubbing off crud and letting it fall into the cracks and crevices, then leaving it all there to dry and cake up. I always rinse the slide and frame with either Brake Parts Cleaner or WD-40.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlockamaniaŽ View Post
    I usually wipe off the slide and barrel down with a clean cloth (after spraying M-Pro7 and brushing through the slide/barrel/recoil spring rod), but wondering if you guys run the slide and barrel through with faucet water to remove any other dirt? And then drying it off with a cloth?

    Thanks.
    1. Simple answer: Do not rinse the slide in water (or any other liquid) while it is still assembled (IE: not completely disassembled). All you will do is push crud into the small areas and cuase a buildup of crap that will, if not eventually, cause the parts to malfunction (especially the firing pin safety and the firing pin). Also, unless the parts are completely disassembled, there is no way to remove all that water (let alone all the crud), which will lead to pitting and rusting of the unfinished steel parts (EG: firing pin assembly, firing pin safety assembly, extractor depressor/spring.) Same goes for the frame and its components.

    2. If M-Pro is an oil-based liquid then you are doing absolutely nothing if you are rinsing with water after the M-Pro is applied (except what is described in "1"). Example: coat your hands w/ baby oil or motor oil, then dry them off. Now run your hands under the faucet; see how the water just beads and runs off your hands without removing the oil? The oil (petroleum) has created a thin, protective layer that cannot be cut or disolved by water.

    In general, to cut an oil based cleaner, use Formula 409 or Simple Green, followed by water.

    Bottom line: Do not soak, immerse, dunk or rinse the slide (or any other part of the weapon w/ multiple components) in ANYTHING if it is not COMPLETELY disassembled. A light CLP wipe down of the rails, inside and outside of the slide are all that's needed during routine cleaning of a GLOCK (IE: field stripping).

  6. #6
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    Thank you PP914.

    I usually first field strip, layout the slide-barrel-recoil spring rod; then spray it down with M-Pro7. Let them sit, brush and wipe it down dry.

    I was thinking about finalizing the process by sprinkling it with water...but I hear what you say about the oil-base liquid. Thanks again PP914.
    Last edited by GlockamaniaŽ; 01-12-2007 at 10:46 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlockamaniaŽ View Post
    Thank you PP914.

    I usually first field strip, layout the slide-barrel-recoil spring rod; then spray it down with M-Pro7. Let them sit, brush and wipe it down dry.
    Thanks again PP914.
    No worries. Just be careful about spraying TOO MUCH M-Pro (or any other cleaner) on the assembled slide and then pushing it and the dirt/carbon into all the crevices. No issues w/ the recoil spring assembly and barrel, though.

  8. #8
    MAN DOG is offline Junior Member
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    Question cooper marks

    Shipwreck or anyone else how can you remove cooper marks off the slide?
    When I carry the slide rubs against the rivets on the Levis that I wear. It has always came off of my glock and fnp9 but it wont come off the sig.I have been using Hoppes no.9 bore cleaner, any suggestions.Also I like the holster that I use all except this problem.

  9. #9
    Shipwreck's Avatar
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    They make a Hoppes copper remover that might work, but its kind of expensive. It supposedly works better than the regular Hoppes.

    But be aware that if its leaving that mark, even if U get the copper off, U will end up scratching it in that place. So, chances are there may be a scratch under the copper mark... At least, there might be...

  10. #10
    PP914's Avatar
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    You can also try Sweets 7.62. It's a STRONG amonia-based, gel-type solvent made for brass and copper removal. Just watch it closely so it doesn't ruin the finish. And be prepared to feel light-headed if you breath it in.

  11. #11
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    Smile

    I would never rinse a gun with water since rust is one of the main reasons people clean and lube their guns in the first place.

    Have any of you guys ever tried Prolix? Since I started using it, I have no need for any other type of cleaner. It melts carbon on contact and better than any other compound I've tried. That is also the opinion of my gunsmith and a number of veteran shooters I have spoken with. Prolix is slightly thicker than water and after applying it to a carbon fouled area, you can just wipe the melted carbon off with a cotton swab or rag. I now use nothing more abrasive than a cotton bore mop and cotton swabs to clean my guns. . It dries without leaving an oily residue yet protects the metal from corrosion. Check it out by entering Prolix on your browser. The stuff costs about $75 per gallon but a gallon should last 2 or 3 years even if you shoot a lot. It has kind of a distinctive odor which I have grown to like. My understanding is the vapors are not harmful even if used in an enclosed, unventilated space.

    And, no, I am not selling it or benefiting from other people buying it. I just think it's a great product for gun owners.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by martial_field View Post
    It has kind of a distinctive odor which I have grown to like. My understanding is the vapors are not harmful even if used in an enclosed, unventilated space.
    What type of distinctive odor? I like the smell of my M-Pro7...it smells...uh..very military clean metal. That's the best way for me to describe it.

  13. #13
    Shipwreck's Avatar
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    If you are not getting lightheaded, its probably okay.

    I can't use Hoppes inside. And, I used to use Rem Oil for years. Even the smaell of that gets me lightheaded by the time I am thru cleaning my guns if I do it inside.

    I use CLP now. No problems w/ that and the smell doesn't bother me.

  14. #14
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    The smell of Prolix is so distinctive, I really cannot describe it to you other than to say it is not obnoxious and I have never experienced light headedness or any other symptoms after using it. Actually, I kind of like the smell of Prolix but other people may not.

    I started using it after my gunsmith in Iowa, who has been at his craft for over 40 years and is considered the best smith in my area (even other gunsmiths tell me they don't know as much as Mr. X) told me: "nothing melts carbon like Prolix." I think he's right. He also told me I was using way too much abrasives on my guns by reaming the bores with wire brushes. WithProlix, I simply use a bore mop on which I've sprayed the product, then use a wooden dowel to push thru a cleaning patch that I've also sprayed with Prolix. The "double dose of Prolix gets the bore spic and span even after I've put 3 or 4 hundred rounds through the gun. For the other parts, I mainly use cotton swabs sprayed with Prolix. For small parts that I've taken off the gun, I'll spray with Prolix, then take a paint brush and brush the parts dry.

    Anyway, it's a good product for gun cleaning and you might want to give it a try.

  15. #15
    old frank is offline Junior Member
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    This apparently will give some of you a heart attack but I field strip my Glocks, spray them down with Simple Green and brush them with a toothbrush in the kitchen sink.

    I rinse everything off with very hot water, blow it out with an air compressor and reoil everything with Mobile 1.

    I currently have two Glocks a G26 that I carry and a G34 that I shoot in competition. I completely strip the G34 about every 2000 rounds and do the same cleaning process. My Glocks look like and perform like new and you will not find a speck of rust on them anywhere.

    Everyone has to do what they think is best but this system has been working for me for nine years since I bought my first Glock.

  16. #16
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    I think the air compressor is what enables you to use water in your cleaning process and not experience any corrosion. Without an air compressor that dries everything in the gun, I definitely would not use water.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by old frank View Post
    This apparently will give some of you a heart attack but I field strip my Glocks, spray them down with Simple Green and brush them with a toothbrush in the kitchen sink.

    I rinse everything off with very hot water, blow it out with an air compressor and reoil everything with Mobile 1.

    I currently have two Glocks a G26 that I carry and a G34 that I shoot in competition. I completely strip the G34 about every 2000 rounds and do the same cleaning process. My Glocks look like and perform like new and you will not find a speck of rust on them anywhere.

    Everyone has to do what they think is best but this system has been working for me for nine years since I bought my first Glock.
    I'm with you on cleaning every 2000 rounds or so. By the same token, I don't change the oil in my car after each time I drive it.

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