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  1. #1
    nukehayes's Avatar
    nukehayes is offline Member
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    How difficult...

    is it to get acustomed to the Glock trigger? I have never shot a Glock and am planning on getting a G19. All I ever shoot is SA or DA/SA weapons. I have shot a Walther P99, and I think it was a QA, but I only put 1 magazine through it. Trigger seemed really stiff and I didn't care much for it. I know that the 34/35 have a lighter trigger, but standard is 5 1/2 lbs. Is there any way to reduce this with aftermarket parts of some simple work I can do? Thanks for your input guys.

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  3. #2
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    Glock triggers are easy to use for the majority of people. Some gun enthusiasts get accustomed to 3 pound custom triggers and are handicapped when shooting service pistols like the Glock. Funny thing is, most new shooters do fine with Glocks, while gun guys whine and complain about the trigger.

    Just work on proper trigger reset and you should do fine with the Glock. You may shoot low/left when you begin with the Glock. Make sure you are using proper finger placement and watch the reset - you should be fine.

    It's pretty easy to replace trigger components in a Glock. I've never felt the need for anything but the standard trigger, but hobby shooters may prefer the 3.5 pound connector. I use mine for defense and just left the trigger alone. It shoots fine - I managed to finish at the top of my last class at Front Sight even though I was "handicapped" by using a stock Glock 17 against custom 1911s and such. (Amusingly, just about every 1911 malfunctioned at least once, while the little Glock just soldiered on with perfect reliability.)
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  4. #3
    Revolver's Avatar
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    I find the DA trigger to be too short. The weight isn't bad at all. It also isn't as crisp and smooth as I'm used to. But then again, my name should tell you why.

    I'd have to agree with Mike and that your best bet would be to just work on getting used to the trigger. I'd have to also agree with his observation that stock pistols seem to be the most reliable. It seems Browning and Gaston got their pistols somewhat right when they put them into production.

  5. #4
    Vom Kriege's Avatar
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    I have found the Glock trigger easier to learn than most types of triggers. I still like a nice smoot TDA double action with a super fast reset like on a nice S&W TSW line, but I can make do with the Glock. I've never really and truly pushed myself on a Glock as I have on a S&W though.

    The 3.5lb connectors make for a nice trigger, but I have the stock triggers in my 19 and my 27. I do want to try the 3.5 connector with a NY1 spring though. I hear that is breaks a little crisper and a little lighter than stock but has a quicker reset.

  6. #5
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    You can purchase a Glock made 3.5 lb. connector and put it in your Glock or have the gun store guy do it in about 5 minutes. There are a number of after market suppliers of triggers for Glocks as well (eg., Ghost). I put a Glock3.5 connector in my home defense gun - a Glock 21-but then switched back to the original trigger because I was a little concerned about liability issues. I do like the 3.5 lb. trigger pull better that I have on my G 34 and 35.

  7. #6
    hberttmank's Avatar
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    Mike, could you give us a little more info on watching the trigger reset? I am not trying to start an argument or anything, just curious why in the last ten years or so a fast or short trigger reset seems to be a very desirable thing to have in a pistol. I have shot a lot of double action revolvers and various autos over the years and never really paid a lot of attention to what is now known as a long reset, I was always more concerned with a good break on the trigger. Once again, not trying to start anything, I respect your opinion a lot, just wondering why the reset is so important these days.

  8. #7
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hberttmank View Post
    Mike, could you give us a little more info on watching the trigger reset? I am not trying to start an argument or anything, just curious why in the last ten years or so a fast or short trigger reset seems to be a very desirable thing to have in a pistol. I have shot a lot of double action revolvers and various autos over the years and never really paid a lot of attention to what is now known as a long reset, I was always more concerned with a good break on the trigger. Once again, not trying to start anything, I respect your opinion a lot, just wondering why the reset is so important these days.
    Thanks for the compliment. Short trigger reset is important in a defense or practical shooting pistol just because it allows you to shoot faster with acceptable accuracy. A gun with a long reset uses extra time for trigger travel, both back and forth. Admittedly, this is measured in fractions of seconds, but over a longer string of fire, it adds up to fairly significant time. Short trigger reset is one of the lesser-known reasons 1911-based pistols have dominated practical competition for so many years.

    As far as controlling the Glock trigger specifically, it is best to reset the trigger properly so you don't have to go through the whole take-up/firm press thing for every shot. Instead you simply have the short, relatively crisp pull for each shot. This makes it more like shooting a single action pistol.

    I like a firm reset that I can clearly feel. Some people prefer a less distinct reset, but I like to be able to feel a definite reset so I know I can fire another shot.

    Trigger reset doesn't really matter in slow-fire or casual shooting.
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  9. #8
    hberttmank's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info, Mike. I don't shoot fast very often, but I think I'll start paying more attention to the reset.

  10. #9
    Mike Barham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hberttmank View Post
    Thanks for the info, Mike. I don't shoot fast very often, but I think I'll start paying more attention to the reset.
    It also helps some people with follow-through. I do it even when shooting an M16/M4 at the relatively slow pace required for Army rifle qualification (40 shots in 4 minutes) because it helps me follow through and do everything the same every time.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  11. #10
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    A lot of people, especially competition shooters in my experience, like the Glock trigger reset because it allows you to considerably shorten the length of trigger pull after the first shot. If you can refine your trigger finger movement to the point where you can just get past the reset point then start rearward again, you have an edge for the reasons Mike pointed out.

    The only drawback is that it is easier to experience an AD (accidental discharge) when you are still recovering from recoil and you have misjudged slightly the reset point and begin your backward movement before you have acquired your target. Not a big deal if you are target shooting but in a competition, it can and usually does mean a disqualification. Don't get me wrong, many if not most competition shooters using Glocks like to take adavantage of the reset point but it does carry this potential.

  12. #11
    john doe. is offline Banned
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    I thought about putting in a 3.5 lb trigger but decided against it. I did do a .25 trigger job which smoothed it up. Easy too.

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    What exactly did you do for the 25 cent trigger job? I know it involves honing the trigger parts but what exactly did you do, if you don't mind my asking. I paid a gunsmith $25 to perform this function so if it's that easy, I'm out $24.75.

  14. #13
    GeorgiaGlocker is offline Junior Member
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    I swapped out the serrated trigger for a smooth one. Some do this. Some do not. My trigger finger would get sore about about 200-250 rounds at the range with the original trigger. With the smooth trigger & trigger bar that problem doesn't exist anymore.

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    john doe. is offline Banned
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