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Thread: Concealed Ideas

  1. #1
    bbarnes is offline Junior Member
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    Concealed Ideas

    I've never owned a handgun but have shot several different brands, and just recently got my permit, so I want to know whats the best gun to use as a concealed weapon, im a fan of glock, and currently looking for a g22 or g23..just need some input

  2. #2
    GCBHM is offline Senior Member
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    Just saw this. While the G22 is a fine pistol, I would go with the G23 if you're comfortable with the .40. I do recommend, however, shooting all calibers to see which you shoot best. Think about follow up shots, etc. Check this link below just for some light reading.

    FBI 9MM Justification, FBI Training Division | LooseRounds.com

  3. #3
    bbarnes is offline Junior Member
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    I have shot a few, and the 9 and 40 is my favorite, the g23 and the g19 have the same barrel length, probably going to go with one of these 2.

  4. #4
    GCBHM is offline Senior Member
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    The 19 and 23 are exactly the same gun, except the caliber. You can't go wrong with either!
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  5. #5
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    Ill give you some advice... shooting a pistol, and carrying one are two separate issues. You say you just got your permit to carry. a permit to carry is for personal protection, not for target shooting at 25 to 50 feet. Its for close in personal protection. If you are going to carry, you should carry it every day, anytime you walk out the door. You can learn by mistakes and buy the wrong gun for the wrong reasons. You want to buy a personal protection weapon that not only gives you confidence in carrying it, but gives you comfort so that you can carry it every day. Most of us here have many weapons, and have bought weapons for different purposes...

    An everyday carry weapon requires some forethought, some research. you don't want to buy a weapon that is too heavy.. you really do not need a double stack for EDC because a double stack weapon is heavy, its wide, its harder to conceal. most personal defense actions take less than 30 seconds. So there is a lot to consider. I've been licensed to carry as a civilian for 40 years, prior to that I was in the Military and retired. You can always buy something you want now, and may find it not to be a comfortable carry... If you have a lot of disposable income you can start to build a arsenal of weapons. If your funds are limited, you should buy a weapon for a specific need. I suspect you want to buy your first weapon to fill your desire for a personal defense carry weapon. you need to figure what caliber you want, what action, type of safety systems. barrel length, weight, trigger pull, etc. You need to buy a personal defense weapon that you can feel confident in its application, speed to draw, comfort while carrying ..

    Good luck. There are enough knowledgeable people here to help you. Most will tell you what they think the ideal weapon for them might be.. but that does not guarantee that their choice will be good for you.
    What works for me may not work for you , that why I'm not suggesting you look at my personal EDC.
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  6. #6
    desertman is offline Member
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    If your a fan of Glocks, go for the G26, G27 or G30. They are more compact and can use the magazines of their larger brethren. You can also add a finger extension to those magazines if you so desire. This will give you the best of both worlds.

  7. #7
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbarnes View Post
    I've never owned a handgun...and just recently got my permit...
    OK, here's my input:
    Learn to shoot instinctively and well, long before you ever carry a concealed weapon out in the world.
    In the process of learning instinctive, accurate defensive shooting, try as many carry-appropriate pistols as you can. Most instructors should have a variety available, for learning purposes.
    When you finally find the pistol which works best in your hands, buy one like it. Be prepared to spend almost half the price of the gun on a really good belt, holster, and reload-magazine pouch.

    Shooting a pistol at targets is absolutely nothing like shooting a pistol to save your life.
    Shooting a pistol effectively and well is difficult, requires training, and demands constant practice to maintain the skill-set.
    Shooting a pistol to save a life or to stop a fight demands determination, concentration, and a sort of trained "automatic pilot."

    It ain't easy.
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  8. #8
    GCBHM is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilTwin View Post
    Ill give you some advice... shooting a pistol, and carrying one are two separate issues. You say you just got your permit to carry. a permit to carry is for personal protection, not for target shooting at 25 to 50 feet. Its for close in personal protection. If you are going to carry, you should carry it every day, anytime you walk out the door. You can learn by mistakes and buy the wrong gun for the wrong reasons. You want to buy a personal protection weapon that not only gives you confidence in carrying it, but gives you comfort so that you can carry it every day. Most of us here have many weapons, and have bought weapons for different purposes...

    An everyday carry weapon requires some forethought, some research. you don't want to buy a weapon that is too heavy.. you really do not need a double stack for EDC because a double stack weapon is heavy, its wide, its harder to conceal. most personal defense actions take less than 30 seconds. So there is a lot to consider. I've been licensed to carry as a civilian for 40 years, prior to that I was in the Military and retired. You can always buy something you want now, and may find it not to be a comfortable carry... If you have a lot of disposable income you can start to build a arsenal of weapons. If your funds are limited, you should buy a weapon for a specific need. I suspect you want to buy your first weapon to fill your desire for a personal defense carry weapon. you need to figure what caliber you want, what action, type of safety systems. barrel length, weight, trigger pull, etc. You need to buy a personal defense weapon that you can feel confident in its application, speed to draw, comfort while carrying ..

    Good luck. There are enough knowledgeable people here to help you. Most will tell you what they think the ideal weapon for them might be.. but that does not guarantee that their choice will be good for you.
    What works for me may not work for you , that why I'm not suggesting you look at my personal EDC.
    I agree with most of what you said, ET, except that about a double stack weapon. Your pistol weighs 25oz empty. The Glock 19 weighs 23.65oz unloaded. It weighs 30oz loaded. Not sure what you're Kimber weighs loaded, but I'm guess it is roughly the same.

    I do agree that the defense weapon requires forethought, and it is a personal situation. That's why I say let the boy pick what he wants. As long as he can handle it, then it's good to go. Wouldn't you agree?

  9. #9
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    I don't think anyone here can convince someone who has a licenses to carry, not to carry until he is ready... IM 70 years old, I shoot every week, just to keep my edge. But I do this to retain my readiness... this newbie is starting out , not ready to carry... but he cant become ready until he picks the right weapon. and becomes familiar with its characteristics. once her becomes confident, he may find its not a good carry gun. There is something we use in automotive design, and its called form, fit and function... these principles can be perfectly applied to a concealed carry choice.
    I do agree that if I thought I could convince anyone in an internet forum, not to carry until they were ready, then I would says so. I don't think a 17 or 19 round, double stack weapon will conceal as well and a single stack at 1.2 inches wide. IM more confident in my aluminum frame then I am with a polymer frame. IM not going to get sucked into the debate over plastic guns vs. metal guns.

    The one thing for sure that I can agree too, is that carrying is better than not carrying unless you are not ready to carry. No one can say when that time actually is. I was ready to carry 40 years ago, but over time I've honed my skills, and over that time I am much better now than I was 40 years ago, even though I'm 40 years older.
    Bill aka ET

  10. #10
    rustygun is online now Member HGF Gold Member
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    That is some excellent advice.
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  11. #11
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilTwin View Post
    I don't think anyone here can convince someone who has a licenses to carry, not to carry until he is ready...
    Perhaps not.
    But I feel that I have the duty to at least try.

    You, I, and the other experienced shooters here, are required by our consciences to offer guidance and instruction in this matter, especially when we are asked a direct question by a new or obviously-inexperienced shooter.
    An important part of that guidance is pointing out that trying to use any weapon without lots of preparation can get the beginner badly hurt, or even killed.

    If anyone here believes what the cinema and TV preaches, that using a pistol is easy, and that accuracy is a natural attribute, let him or her instead think of using a sword: Do you truly believe that you can use a sword effectively, immediately upon acquiring one? Think about it.

  12. #12
    GCBHM is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilTwin View Post
    I don't think anyone here can convince someone who has a licenses to carry, not to carry until he is ready... IM 70 years old, I shoot every week, just to keep my edge. But I do this to retain my readiness... this newbie is starting out , not ready to carry... but he cant become ready until he picks the right weapon. and becomes familiar with its characteristics. once her becomes confident, he may find its not a good carry gun. There is something we use in automotive design, and its called form, fit and function... these principles can be perfectly applied to a concealed carry choice.
    I do agree that if I thought I could convince anyone in an internet forum, not to carry until they were ready, then I would says so. I don't think a 17 or 19 round, double stack weapon will conceal as well and a single stack at 1.2 inches wide. IM more confident in my aluminum frame then I am with a polymer frame. IM not going to get sucked into the debate over plastic guns vs. metal guns.

    The one thing for sure that I can agree too, is that carrying is better than not carrying unless you are not ready to carry. No one can say when that time actually is. I was ready to carry 40 years ago, but over time I've honed my skills, and over that time I am much better now than I was 40 years ago, even though I'm 40 years older.
    Bill aka ET
    It seems as though you're responding to Steve and myself, but I will address what I was asking about. First, no one said anything about "plastic guns verses metal guns", so let's stay on point. I stated that I didn't agree with your statement about double stack weapons. Not all double stack pistols hold 17 or 19 rounds. And the Glock 19, 23, 26, 27 are all 1.18" wide. All are extremely concealable. Most would argue just as concealable as your 1911 micro. The double stack Glock 19 is very likely no heavier than your 1911. It may be a little longer, but the grip isn't. The Glock 26/27 is smaller and lighter, and easier to conceal than the 19/23, but as I stated, all four are very easy to conceal and no heavier than the 1911 you carry. Of course, thorough research will prove this out.

  13. #13
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    Don't limit yourself to one brand or caliber of firearm. Go out and rent and try every firearm and caliber you can afford. If you you are not comfortable with whatever firearm you purchase, you won't practice with it, and that is the name of the game. Practice, practice and more practice. Yes its pricey but the care and feeding of the hobbie has its prices. But hay what do I know.

  14. #14
    GCBHM is offline Senior Member
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    It should be noted that there was another thread on which this was discussed with the OP.

  15. #15
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    I did not notice this thread was in the Glock forum. It was probably not my place to post in this thread...

    AS far as any thoughts on plastic vs. metal... I already said that to avoid any further mention of it.

    AS far as Steve and the duty to try to influence... just an FYI... that is exactly what I did... try to influence him with out telling him not to carry until he is ready.

    Similar to calling some one as ass but not saying so by saying , " I could call you an ASS but I wont " if you get that drift.....

  16. #16
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    Back to advice for the OP. Since you have a permit, I assume you've met your state's basic training requirement for a concealed carry. That's not enough. Get some good quality basic shooting training. Get some defensive pistol training that goes beyond the minimum for carry in your state. Make sure the instructors have a great local reputation.

    I like the idea of competing in an action shooting discipline, USPSA, ICORE, IDPA or some kind of 3 Gun. Shooting with the stress of the clock is better practice than shooting at a round target on a square range.

  17. #17
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilTwin View Post
    I did not notice this thread was in the Glock forum. It was probably not my place to post in this thread...
    Don't let that stop you, ET.
    Regardless of the area of the forum, all input is useful. And most of it is instructive.


    Quote Originally Posted by EvilTwin View Post
    ...try to influence him with out telling him not to carry until he is ready.
    Similar to calling some one as ass but not saying so by saying , " I could call you an ASS but I wont " if you get that drift...
    I gotta disagree.
    Certainly, I don't try to be subtle...well, at least not phony-subtle.
    Since I am experienced, and since I have successfully taught people to shoot defensively, I believe that I have both the background and the standing to make that sort of judgment.
    Besides, I did outline all of the difficulties that he would face, were he to go out in public with a gun and very little experience, and then run into trouble.
    Then it becomes his decision.

    "Forewarned is forearmed," as it is frequently said.
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  18. #18
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    Your carry pistol is like a pair of gloves in that one size does not fit all. Folks with big hands find it difficult to hold on to tiny pistols and just the opposite with small hands. Most people will tell you that you should go with a service caliber weapon for self-defense, especially for your first CCW. Try to get an idea how large a weapon you will carry everyday. While you CAN carry any size/weight pistol made, what you WILL or are willing to carry everyday is totally different and can change from season to season or situation to situation. Everyone has what is right for them or they are still searching for that compromise between what they WANT to carry and what they WILL carry. Go to a gun store and fondle some pistols and see what feels good to you. Rent/test fire, if possible as many different styles and calibers as you can to see what you shoot the best. There are hundreds of possible carry guns available and most manufacturers make excellent products with great warranties at various price points. Only you can choose what is right for you. Generally heavy guns shoot the best, but small guns hide the best. Personally, for me, I like a simple to operate carry firearm. A point and shoot platform devoid of user operated safeties levers and anything I might forget to disengage or engage in an emergency high stress situation. While I am about 99% confident I'll never have to use my firearm for protection in my normal day to day life, in that 1% possibility that I do, I want to #1 have it with me. A .22 in my hand is better than my .45 left at home. My personal CCWs vary from my tiny .32acp NAA to my .45acp. and my PF9 being about the middle ground between the them.

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