Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    PnutButtaToast is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    2

    Just got my glock!

    Hey all! I bought my first gun and glock a g19. I can't wait to get to a range this weekend. But before I put some rounds through I have some questions.

    1) Is there any cleaning or other prep stuff I need to do ootb? I've read that they are ready to shoot out of the case but a lot of this info I find is several years old.

    2) Is it normal for glock to send shells with their guns? Mine came with a small envelope with 2 shells in it. I'm sure there is a reason but it just seems weird.

    Thanks for looking and for the help!

  2. Ads
  3. #2
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    No need to do anything. Just take and shoot! Now, before you put any hot rounds through it, like the Hornady Critical Duty +P (which I recommend for personal defense), put 200 rounds of standard ball ammo through it to break it in. Glock test fires every pistol before it is released for sale, and they put the two casings from that test firing in each box. Congrats!!! The G19 is one of the finest pistols money can buy. It is my personal EDC pistol.

  4. #3
    denner's Avatar
    denner is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,821
    #1 I strongly disagree, you should thoroughly clean and lightly lube the pistol before firing it. I'm not a Glock guy, but I believe you leave that red grease on the rails or near the striker channel alone and don't get any oil into the striker pin channel. If the new pistol is bone dry, or has packing oil/or grease it's not a good thing to be firing away with it out of the box. Not that you can't, but I would not suggest that w/ any firearm.

    Glock recommends that you clean and lightly lube the new pistol before firing > http://us.glock.com/documents/gun_maintenance.pdf

    I'm sure other Glock guys will be chiming in on the subject here shortly. BTW, it's always good to read your owners manual first.

  5. #4
    desertman is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    421
    PnutButtaToast:
    You should first read the owners manual, field strip, function test and lube if needed to familiarize yourself with any new firearm before firing it. Field stripping and function testing will allow you to examine the pistol in case there could be something wrong. The two Glocks that I have came from the factory properly lubed according to the owners manual but this is no reason to assume anything. Those two shell casings would normally be turned over to the state police by the dealer where some states require them for so called forensic evidence. In states that don't they are included with the gun. You will notice the make, model, caliber and serial number are on the envelope containing the shells. Ridiculous, I know but so is micro stamping and this is a form of it. Can you imagine examining tens of thousands of shell casings trying to find a match? I wonder where they store all of those empties? What if the gun is lost, stolen or sold after the initial purchase? Or the owner moves to another state? Another example of politicians passing laws of which they know nothing about.

  6. #5
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Boy boy boy...OK! SMH I have been shooting Glocks for years, and I have never field stripped or cleaned a brand new pistol out of the box prior to shooting it. Can you? Sure! Do you need to? No. Now, if it is a used pistol, of course. By all means, break it down, inspect it, and ensure it is clean. Glocks do not need a lot of lube. They will malfunction if too much lube is used.

    Now should you familiarize yourself with your weapon? Of course!!! I didn't see the need to insult your intelligence by stating the obvious. Here's what you can do. Take the pistol out of the box. With the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, remove the magazine and cycle the slide a few times just to ensure the weapon isn't loaded. Then lock the slide in the rear position. Inspect the barrel to ensure no obstructions are in the barrel. Of course, I assumed that you're intelligent enough to at least learn these things prior to purchasing a firearm when I answered your questions. Hope you enjoy your new pistol!!!!

  7. #6
    denner's Avatar
    denner is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,821
    Here's someone who decided to fire his brand new Glock 19 Gen 4 straight out of the box bone dry. I would pay particular note to DJ Niners observations.

    My Brand New Glock 19 Gen 4 cracks apart after 10 rounds

  8. #7
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by denner View Post
    Here's someone who decided to fire his brand new Glock 19 Gen 4 straight out of the box bone dry. I would pay particular note to DJ Niners observations.

    My Brand New Glock 19 Gen 4 cracks apart after 10 rounds
    No amount of inspections would have caught that problem or stopped that pistol from doing that. Who knows what could have been done to that weapon prior to it being purchased. I wouldn't put a lot of stock in it.

  9. #8
    denner's Avatar
    denner is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,821
    Quote Originally Posted by GCBHM View Post
    Boy boy boy...OK! SMH I have been shooting Glocks for years, and I have never field stripped or cleaned a brand new pistol out of the box prior to shooting it. Can you? Sure! Do you need to? No. Now, if it is a used pistol, of course. By all means, break it down, inspect it, and ensure it is clean. Glocks do not need a lot of lube. They will malfunction if too much lube is used.

    Now should you familiarize yourself with your weapon? Of course!!! I didn't see the need to insult your intelligence by stating the obvious. Here's what you can do. Take the pistol out of the box. With the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, remove the magazine and cycle the slide a few times just to ensure the weapon isn't loaded. Then lock the slide in the rear position. Inspect the barrel to ensure no obstructions are in the barrel. Of course, I assumed that you're intelligent enough to at least learn these things prior to purchasing a firearm when I answered your questions. Hope you enjoy your new pistol!!!!
    So, I presume you know better than the manufacturer themselves? I would certainly take Glocks advice over yours even though you say you've been shooting Glock's for years, unless you know something Glock doesn't? You have gotten away with it, but why take a chance, evidently in the link provided that Glock 19 either had a faulty locking block or broke after being shot new out of the box bone dry? I'm thinking being shot bone dry against the recommendation of the manufacturer, but who's to say. Only thing certain is what Glock states in their maintenance manual.

  10. #9
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by denner View Post
    So, I presume you know better than the manufacturer themselves? I would certainly take Glocks advice over yours even though you say you've been shooting Glock's for years. You have gotten away with it, but why take a chance, evidently in the link provided that Glock 19 either had a faulty locking block or broke after being shot new out of the box bone dry? I'm thinking being shot bone dry against the recommendation of the manufacturer, but who's to say.
    Not only have I been shooting for years, but I've also asked Glock experts who told me what the manufacturer recommends, but that it isn't necessary. That is bc the pistols do not come bone dry. You really don't know for sure what was wrong with the Glock in the link you provided. Nor does the guy who actually fired the pistol, or at least he didn't at the time. There is never anything wrong with being overly cautious, but to answer the original question, it is not necessary to do any cleaning or prep work prior to firing the weapon. That is not to say that making sure the pistol is safe and ready to fire isn't necessary, but that wasn't the question. Was it.

  11. #10
    rustygun is offline Junior Member HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Canton, Oh
    Posts
    96
    If it were mine I would clean and lube per manufactures recommendation. Glocks do not like alot of lube just put the DROPS where they show you. 3-2-1 Slide gets 3 drops, barrel gets 2, and frame gets one. There are plenty of you tube videos that can show you this. There are plenty of quality cleaning and lubing products. I suggest researching that as well. Just my 2 cents. Enjoy your new pistol and be SAFE.

  12. #11
    denner's Avatar
    denner is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,821
    Quote Originally Posted by GCBHM View Post
    Not only have I been shooting for years, but I've also asked Glock experts who told me what the manufacturer recommends, but that it isn't necessary. That is bc the pistols do not come bone dry. You really don't know for sure what was wrong with the Glock in the link you provided. Nor does the guy who actually fired the pistol, or at least he didn't at the time. There is never anything wrong with being overly cautious, but to answer the original question, it is not necessary to do any cleaning or prep work prior to firing the weapon. That is not to say that making sure the pistol is safe and ready to fire isn't necessary, but that wasn't the question. Was it.
    I'd stick with the manual would be my advice. It seems odd the manual tells you to do one thing and you and the experts are prescribing another. If it's brand new you should clean out any preservative or packing oil on any firearm, lube, and inspect, especially the barrel. If you don't roll that way fine, but I do, and would recommend the same to any new pistol owner that asks the question. He will either take your advice, mine, or another and that will be his ultimate decision.

  13. #12
    desertman is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    421
    GCBHM:
    "I have been shooting Glocks for years, and I have never field stripped or cleaned a brand new pistol out of the box prior to shooting it."
    As PnutButtaToast said this is his first gun and Glock, it really isn't a bad idea to field strip the weapon and examine it, according to the owners manual. I have bought brand new weapons that were dripping with oil or grease, and some have had hardly any. Personally, I field strip and examine every firearm that I buy before using it, either new or used. Just because a product, any product is brand new doesn't mean that there could never be anything wrong with it. Field stripping is a fairly simple task and will allow the owner, especially a first time gun owner to familiarize themselves with the weapon and have a better understanding of how it operates in addition to performing the safety checks such as the firing pin safety check which Glock recommends before firing the pistol. No one knows whether a field strip might have discovered the broken locking block? It is possible that it might have, but by not field stripping the firearm before its use, it definitely would not have been discovered. And as you've stated "Who knows what could have been done to that weapon prior to it being purchased." Another good reason for field stripping and examining a weapon before using it. I've spent a good part of my adult life working on cars and guns only to discover cracked and or broken parts and tools before using them.

  14. #13
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    GCBHM:

    As PnutButtaToast said this is his first gun and Glock, it really isn't a bad idea to field strip the weapon and examine it, according to the owners manual. I have bought brand new weapons that were dripping with oil or grease, and some have had hardly any. Personally, I field strip and examine every firearm that I buy before using it, either new or used. Just because a product, any product is brand new doesn't mean that there could never be anything wrong with it. Field stripping is a fairly simple task and will allow the owner, especially a first time gun owner to familiarize themselves with the weapon and have a better understanding of how it operates in addition to performing the safety checks such as the firing pin safety check which Glock recommends before firing the pistol. No one knows whether a field strip might have discovered the broken locking block? It is possible that it might have, but by not field stripping the firearm before its use, it definitely would not have been discovered. And as you've stated "Who knows what could have been done to that weapon prior to it being purchased." Another good reason for field stripping and examining a weapon before using it. I've spent a good part of my adult life working on cars and guns only to discover cracked and or broken parts and tools before using them.
    Actually, he said he got his Glock.

  15. #14
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is online now HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North-Central USA
    Posts
    4,186
    1. I'd definitely recommend going with the manufacturer's recommendation to clean and lube the pistol properly before the first time it is fired.


    2. If you feel the need to take the word of same faceless stranger on the internet over the manufacturer's recommendations, based on that stranger's personal experience with Glock pistols, then okay, of course you can do that. Here are a few of my Glocks:





    and the recommendation of THIS faceless stranger (along with most of the other folks in this thread), just happens to be the same as point #1, above.

    Congratulations on your new Glock!
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  16. #15
    desertman is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    421
    GCBHM:
    "Hey all! I bought my first gun and glock a g19."
    His first sentence, not mine.

  17. #16
    desertman is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    421
    DJ Niner:
    "and the recommendation of THIS faceless stranger (along with most of the other folks in this thread), just happens to be the same as point #1, above."
    Thank you! I could not in good conscience tell someone who bought his first gun and a Glock to just take it out of the box and shoot it ("No need to do anything. Just take and shoot!") without familiarizing himself with the weapon and reading the owners manual. That is an accident waiting to happen. It's bad enough that we have to put up with an anti gun media and politicians. Why give them more ammunition to use against us? God forbid if there were something wrong with that weapon and it blew up in the shooters face, or worse yet hit an innocent bystander while loading or unloading the weapon. Or just plain carrying it in a dangerous condition.

  18. #17
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    DJ Niner:

    Thank you! I could not in good conscience tell someone who bought his first gun and a Glock to just take it out of the box and shoot it ("No need to do anything. Just take and shoot!") without familiarizing himself with the weapon and reading the owners manual. That is an accident waiting to happen. It's bad enough that we have to put up with an anti gun media and politicians. Why give them more ammunition to use against us? God forbid if there were something wrong with that weapon and it blew up in the shooters face, or worse yet hit an innocent bystander while loading or unloading the weapon. Or just plain carrying it in a dangerous condition.
    Anyone who buys a gun, of any kind, and does not take the time to familiarize themselvses with it doesn't need to have one. I assumed that the individual who purchased this pistol was smart enough to take the necessary safety precautions and familiarize themselves with their new pistol prior to shooting it. Again, I answered the question asked. There is no need to clean it or do any other prep stuff before you shoot the gun. I stand by my answer.

    I will say that I do not disagree with anything anyone has said. It is always a good idea to familiarize yourself with your weapon. I always do! Like I said, I assumed that the person was smart enough to do that on their own. Like I said, I am aware of the manufacturer's recommendations. ALL manufacturers recommend doing that, and again, it isn't a bad idea. I just do not feel it is "necessary" with the Glocks. Every one I have inspected has been in working order. I have shot a lot of these pistols from the first gen to the latest, and I have never had a malfunction. That isn't to say there has not been a stove pipe or two along the way, but that isn't what I call a malfunction.

  19. #18
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    GCBHM:

    His first sentence, not mine.
    You are right. I over looked that. My apologies.

  20. #19
    desertman is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    421
    GCBHM:
    "You are right. I over looked that. My apologies."
    Accepted! No big deal.

    " I assumed that the person was smart enough to do that on their own."
    Unfortunately in this day and age we have to assume that the individual knows absolutely nothing about firearms. As for me, I always field strip, examine and function test every firearm, new or used that I buy before firing it with live ammunition. It gives me piece of mind, no matter what make the gun is, there's bound to be a defective one sometime or another.

  21. #20
    donk123 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    80
    how can it hurt to dissassemble and clean and lube,whether it is used or not. i do that with all of mine,regardless of what anyone says. bought my g19 gen4 about a year ago,and fell in love with it. a lot of guns come from the factory with a thick preservative gel on them. it is a good idea,no matter what,to clean and lube it up before using it.

  22. #21
    SouthernBoy's Avatar
    SouthernBoy is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Western Prince William County, Va
    Posts
    1,879
    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    As for me, I always field strip, examine and function test every firearm, new or used that I buy before firing it with live ammunition. It gives me piece of mind, no matter what make the gun is, there's bound to be a defective one sometime or another.
    I also do this. But my reasons, while for the most part are much the same as have been mentioned, are also a little different than have been expressed here on this thread in this manner. I am mechanically inclined and mechanically logical so I like to see how the gun works internally. How it functions in its process of handling a round of ammunition from storing to firing it. Now granted, this is not going to be completely satisfied on many, if not most, guns by a simple field stripping of its essential components. But one can get a pretty good idea of how the gun functions by doing this.

    And yes, I also wipe it off, inside and out, inspect fundamental parts for obstructions or obvious wear, and use my preferred lubrication products before firing it for the first time. I also do quite a bit of handling and dry firing of the gun prior to its first range session. Basically, I want to gain a measure of familiarity with the gun before running it with live ammunition for my own peace of mind and safety's sake.

    Besides, I just love handling firearms.

  23. #22
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    GCBHM:

    Accepted! No big deal.


    Unfortunately in this day and age we have to assume that the individual knows absolutely nothing about firearms. As for me, I always field strip, examine and function test every firearm, new or used that I buy before firing it with live ammunition. It gives me piece of mind, no matter what make the gun is, there's bound to be a defective one sometime or another.
    If I were actually face to face with them, going to the range with them, etc., I would have a different approach. However, seeing that we're on a forum, I went with the short answer.

  24. #23
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by donk123 View Post
    how can it hurt to dissassemble and clean and lube,whether it is used or not. i do that with all of mine,regardless of what anyone says. bought my g19 gen4 about a year ago,and fell in love with it. a lot of guns come from the factory with a thick preservative gel on them. it is a good idea,no matter what,to clean and lube it up before using it.
    It doesn't hurt. No one said it does.

  25. #24
    Blackhawkman is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12
    I would clean and lube any new rifle or pistol. Glock's will shoot out of the box, but why not clean the bore and slide? My first year of production Model 17 has 250,000 rounds because it was taken care of and maintained.

  26. #25
    GCBHM is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawkman View Post
    I would clean and lube any new rifle or pistol. Glock's will shoot out of the box, but why not clean the bore and slide? My first year of production Model 17 has 250,000 rounds because it was taken care of and maintained.
    My cousin, who is a cop, said his department at the time had a production model 17 that had never been cleaned once, and had over 250,000 rounds through it. Now, personally, I would not fire that many round without at least one cleaning, but still.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

original glock ads

Click on a term to search for related topics.