Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    northstar19 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    33

    Glock 21 SF vs. Glock 37: Recoil

    I'm trying to decide which pistol to buy: G21SF (gen 3) or G37 (gen 3). 45 ACP or 45 GAP. I can't go wrong, either way. But the decision may come down to recoil. If I enjoy shooting the gun, I will practice more. If I practice more, I can become more accurate with it. (And I would like the wife to shoot this pistol, now and then, as well.) Therefore, I am wondering: is there any difference in the recoil between these two firearms? Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is online now HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North-Central USA
    Posts
    4,385
    The two cartridges are basically the same, shooting the same size/weight bullets at the same velocities, so the only real difference will be in the pistols.

    As far as recoil goes, using the same cartridge, a lighter pistol will kick more/harder than a heavier pistol. In addition, the frames of these two pistols are not the same size when it comes to grip circumference. The G37 has the same size frame as the 9mm/.40/357 Glock pistols; only the slide is heavier and slightly larger. Most folks feel that a pistol kicks less if they can really get their hand around it and control it. So...

    The G21SF weighs slightly more (empty or loaded), and therefore should kick slightly less, based simply on the math.

    The G37 is smaller and easier to grip, and probably sits just a hair lower in the user's hand, both of which will make it "feel" like it kicks less.

    Tough call.

    If it was me, I'd go with the G37. I kind of made this call a couple of years ago, when I rather unexpectedly found myself owning a G21SF. I used it for a year, but simply could not get over the larger grip size, which was different than all my other Glocks. So I sold it.

    I never bought a G37 for two reasons: cost of the ammunition, and the general lack of availability of the ammo. When I could find it, .45 GAP ammo was 10%-20% higher priced than .45 ACP, and I've never really been a "gotta have a big bullet" kind of guy, so I just bought a .40 caliber Glock (first of several), and that was that. I now have only 9mm and .40 Glocks, and I don't feel restricted at all.

    Hope this was helpful.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  3. #3
    MrGlock45 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    6
    I have owned both. I love the 45ACP, but I do have small hands for a man. That being said I would highly recommend the G37 in Gen 4, because it has the dual recoil spring set up of all Gen 4's. You should find the recoil less with the G37.
    As for ammo availability, check out Georgia Arms. I recently bought 500 rounds for $185.00 plus shipping. Turns out that is was considerably less than 45ACP.
    I have 4 guns in 45 GAP, I love the caliber. The grip frame is perfect for my smaller hands. They are extremely accurate, and the recoil is quite mild for 45.

    As always, stay safe.

  4. #4
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,393
    ...But you may discover that .45 GAP cartridges are hard to find, while .45 ACP cartridges are always available in every gun shop.

  5. #5
    MrGlock45 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    ...But you may discover that .45 GAP cartridges are hard to find, while .45 ACP cartridges are always available in every gun shop.
    I agree Steve, 45 ACP is much more available, however, if you ask your LGS to stock it for you they will. As I said earlier, online availability makes it much more affordable.
    YMMV but this works for me quite well.

    By the way, I own 2 G30SF's, so I'm in no way bashing the venerable old Colt cartridge.

  6. #6
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Penn's Woods
    Posts
    494
    I have a slightly different opinion.

    I grew up with 45 ACP pistols in my hands (Colt 1911's). I was in my mid-thirties before I fired my first 9 x 19mm pistol. I'm presently 70 years old; and the owner of a pair of identical, custom-built, 3rd generation, Glock Model G-21's. I'm, also, a big man; and I have no trouble, whatsoever, concealing a full-size G-21 frame on my person all day long (Sometimes for up to 12 or 14 hours).

    My personal opinion is that the, 'size thing' with standard frame G-21's is largely an internet myth. By standard, pistol fit, sizing dimensions a standard 21 frame is a good 1/8" too large for my (not so huge) hands. (Yes, 'hands', I'm ambidextrous.) The thing is that the large size of a standard 21 frame has never worked against allowing me to do (truthfully) the very best pistol shooting of my life! (One afternoon I, even, took a standing ovation from a large group of police officers as I walked off the line.)

    The stretch in my trigger finger only occurs on THE FIRST SHOT as I bring the trigger back from its full forward position. Thereafter, and if I'm firing consistently in sets, I always pull the trigger from its reset position until my sights come off the target(s). I have tendonitis in my well overused hands. The wide backstraps on my G-21's actually give me considerably greater control over the muzzle, and makes a 21 much easier for me to hang onto over an extended course of fire (150 rounds +).

    Under no circumstances would I ever choose a 4th generation Glock over a 3rd generation pistol. (I'll, literally, shoot my 3rd generation Glocks to the grave!) My G-21's are very well set up with NP3 coated, Wolff Gunsprings' non-captured, solid steel guide rods; and, with all the work I do on Glocks I have never found a better recoil guide rod. (I've got plenty of spare rods around here, too!)

    You know, after the first 50 rounds, when you really start to, 'get going', every fraction of a second you can shave off of, 'muzzle air time' is going to help you to hit the target more accurately while you're firing at speed; and Wolff rods, definitely, help me to do this. Not only are they very slippery; but these rods are, also, a little thicker than many other steel rods. This nice tight fit between the rod and spring assists the recoil spring in traveling very smoothly back and forth.

    There's, also, no annoying little end screw to come flying off in the middle of a match. (Once an end screw is gone you ain't never going to find it again; and using Loctite to fix it in place defeats the purpose of being able to quickly change recoil springs between target, and self-defense loads.) I am, also, 100% certain that a good solid steel guide rod SIGNIFICANTLY reduces front-end frame vibration.

    In my experience at teaching people how to handle pistols I have found two particular cartridges to be the easiest for novices (and others) to shoot repeatedly and continue to do a decent job of managing recoil with: the 45 ACP, and 9 x 19mm chamberings. I am NOT prejudice, though; and I've, now, had enough experience with the 45 GAP to be willing to quickly add it to this list. The 45 GAP shoots well!

    This said, I'd fault the 45 GAP for three things: (1) It's expensive to shoot. (2) Availability is limited. I've never seen 45 GAP cartridges available at any Wal-Mart in Northeastern Pennsylvania where I do a lot of my, 'run out and pick up' ammunition shopping. (3) What the 45 GAP will do, the 45 ACP will do, too. As a number of police agencies - The Pennsylvania State Police among them - have discovered: There is no particular advantage to going with the 45 GAP. The expense to inventory 45 GAP cartridges is too high; and availability and delivery problems occur too frequently.

    When you trim off all the, 'internet glitz' and, 'advertising fluff' the 45 GAP is largely an unnecessary, 'vanity round'. (I think Gaston Glock had two problems he particularly wanted to address when he came up with the 45 GAP: First, he wanted to solve his (mostly imaginary) marketing problems with the large 45 ACP frames; and, second, he simply wanted to, 'put his name' on a cartridge of his own design. Now, perhaps, that's great; but, one highly desirable feature about 45 ACP pistols got dumped in the crapper: You can convert a 45 ACP pistol to the powerful 45 Super caliber without a great deal of effort or expense; BUT, you can't convert the 45 GAP to anything.)

    Personally, I find it difficult to understand, 'Why' anyone would have a problem trying to manage a 45 ACP Glock pistol? Other than for someone with really small hands, (Smaller than mine; and I do not have particularly large hands.) there shouldn't be a problem with frame size; but, then again, I'm a member of an older generation who was taught to pick up any gun and shoot it well. (My Marine Corps, 'uncles' who taught me to shoot would have laughed their heads off at the idea of someone needing to find a gun that, 'fit' in order to shoot well. Back in the 50's the Marines were trained to shoot very well. Point a Marine at a gun; and he'd pick it up and quickly work effectively with it; AND that's the way I was taught to shoot, too.)

    I'm married to a very gentle woman who's not overly strong. After she was almost carjacked I taught her how to use a revolver in self-defense situations. I've, now, got a charming and feminine wife who can use a, 'healthy' 357 Magnum revolver with a 3" barrel better than most men I watch shoot at the range every weekend! (You know what I did? While I was training her I forgot to tell her that a, 'full house' 357 Magnum revolver is difficult for many people to control. (What I'm telling you, here, is that savvy handgun training is an IMPORTANT PART of learning how to skillfully manage recoil.)

    RECOIL SHOULD NEVER BE VIEWED AS AN OBSTACLE TO BE OVERCOME; INSTEAD, IT SHOULD BE VIEWED AS A NECESSARY TOOL WITHOUT WHICH IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO SHOOT ANY GUN WELL.

    Both calibers you're interested in will work; both can be used effectively; the final decision is up to you. I, personally, wouldn't encourage you to make a final decision based upon either frame size, or (perceived) recoil characteristics alone. Remember, PERCEPTION CAN CHANGE; and, once you own a gun you've, also, got to feed it. Take a note from an older firearms instructor: Unless you fire, at least, 500 rounds a month you ain't ever going to be really good with a handgun. The best pistol shooting I've ever done always occurred during those months when I was firing between 1,000 and 1,500 rounds (at a rate of, about, 300 rounds a week). It kept my Dillon XL650 busy!

    Good luck to you!

  7. #7
    northstar19 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    33
    Thanks for all your thoughtful comments. I learned something from each of you. However, after the SHOT Show, when Glock brought out the new model 41, I decided to buy one of those. The .45 ACP longslide. I've received the pistol, cleaned it, and lubed it, but have yet to take it to the range. Should be interesting.

  8. #8
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is online now HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North-Central USA
    Posts
    4,385
    Be sure to let us know how that new Glock shoots; many folks are interested in it!
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  9. #9
    WilliamDahl's Avatar
    WilliamDahl is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    TX Gulf Coast
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by northstar19 View Post
    Thanks for all your thoughtful comments. I learned something from each of you. However, after the SHOT Show, when Glock brought out the new model 41, I decided to buy one of those. The .45 ACP longslide. I've received the pistol, cleaned it, and lubed it, but have yet to take it to the range. Should be interesting.
    Well, you definitely chose the right caliber. I haven't seen the G41, but I currently have two G21s (one is destined to be converted to .45 Super or .460 Rowland and the other to 10mm). I don't necessarily think that I have LARGE hands (i.e. I can't palm a basketball), but when I buy gloves, I do have to buy the largest that I can find. I don't find the G21 to have that particularly large of a grip. Sure, it feels a bit fatter than a regular single stack M1911, but that is part of the price of having the extra rounds in a double stack mag.

  10. #10
    Sgt45's Avatar
    Sgt45 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    206
    While we're talking about the G21, I am going to get one at the end of the month. What holster size does it take, i.e. is it similar to a G19 or G22? I'm assuming that the magazines are particular to the model

  11. #11
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is online now HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North-Central USA
    Posts
    4,385
    Quote Originally Posted by Sgt45 View Post
    While we're talking about the G21, I am going to get one at the end of the month. What holster size does it take, i.e. is it similar to a G19 or G22? I'm assuming that the magazines are particular to the model
    Similar to, but larger than either of those. Thickness of the slide is greater on the G21 than any of the 9mm/.40/.357 pistols. Magazines are also thicker, both in width and front-to-back depth, so you'll have to get a mag pouch made for a double-column .45 ACP (not .45 GAP) or 10mm Glock mag for it to work.

    The above comments refer to quality "fitted" holsters and mag pouches, of both leather and rigid/semi-rigid plastic/synthetic construction, not the floppsy woven-nylon sausage-sack crap.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  12. #12
    Sgt45's Avatar
    Sgt45 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    206
    I now have the gun (G21SF gen 3) and it shoots really well. Recoil is negligible and easily managed. I am in the process of getting magazine pouches for it as everything I have is too small. Having trashed Glocks for 30 years, I really like this one. I guess the grip angle has changed over the Gen 1 models. This pistol has been a real eye opener and I may just have to get a 9mm G19

  13. #13
    northstar19 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    33
    Well, I finally took my Glock 41 to the range. And I find that it's a relatively soft-shooting .45, that points naturally, and shoots very accurately. But compared to the Glock 21? The model 41 slide is longer, of course, and more slender, and the gun weighs a couple of ounces less. Yet I, for one, can't tell much difference between the 21 and 41 in terms of recoil or accuracy. (Another shooter might be more sensitive to any differences that may exist.) The Glock 41 does come with adjustable rear sights. My gun started out shooting consistently to the left, so I had to crank it over a few clicks to get it on target. Then it was dead on. Of all the practical/tactical pistols offered by Glock, I like this one best. The earlier models adjusted weight by taking a cut-out from the top of the slide. To me, the appearance of that cut-out is somewhat strange. And I've heard others say that they've gotten debris inside the cut-out. In one of his videos, for instance, Nutnfancy mentions that a tiny piece of gravel jammed his model 34 one day. (Something to think about, if you ever have to go to the ground for any reason.) But the Glock 41 has the solid slide. So: Looks good. Works fine. Chambered in .45 ACP. I give it a thumbs up. For sure.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

g37 recoil vs g21
,
glock 21 sf v. glock 37
,

glock 21 vs 37

,

glock 21 vs glock 37

,
glock 21 vs glock 41
,
glock 21sf
,

glock 21sf or.glock 37

,
glock 21sf recoil
,
glock 37 vs 21
,

glock 37 vs glock 21

,
is the glock 37 gap the same frame as the glock 21
,
review glock 37 gen 4 fit small hands
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1