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  1. #1
    BeardedOne is offline Junior Member
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    Best Glock for concealed carry

    I'm not yet the age to carry concealed, but I'm researching.

    You've seen the title, now for a description of me and my preferences.
    I'm 6'3" and slim. I wear jeans or shorts and a t-shirt usually. I don't have meaty hands, but I have long fingers.

    I've shot a revolver plenty, and I just can't get the hang of it. However, I'm fairly proficient with my dad's Glock 19.

    The main reason I want a Glock is reliability and the trigger safety only. I went out and shot a Taurus and an Astra today, but both malfunctioned.

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    pic is offline Senior Member HGF Gold Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeardedOne View Post
    I'm not yet the age to carry concealed, but I'm researching.

    You've seen the title, now for a description of me and my preferences.
    I'm 6'3" and slim. I wear jeans or shorts and a t-shirt usually. I don't have meaty hands, but I have long fingers.

    I've shot a revolver plenty, and I just can't get the hang of it. However, I'm fairly proficient with my dad's Glock 19.

    The main reason I want a Glock is reliability and the trigger safety only. I went out and shot a Taurus and an Astra today, but both malfunctioned.
    Glock is very reliable, carrying a GLOCK, n shooting a GLOCK At the range is a whole new adventure.
    Carrying a glock concealed needs your fullest attention. The glock is very reliable.

  4. #3
    DaleBalkie's Avatar
    DaleBalkie is offline Junior Member
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    Best Glock for concealmen would obviously be the G26 because of its size. However, based on your physical size I see no issues with the G19 for you! Its really a personal choice!!!

  5. #4
    injunear is offline Junior Member
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    Look into the g 30 just the right size easy to conceal if y ou need the power it's there

  6. #5
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    pic is offline Senior Member HGF Gold Member
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    A 10 round 40 cal. Would be another choice if your mind is made up on a glock.
    My g27 glock 40 cal. Is quite the self defense piece for easy concealment.
    I haven't any issues with recoil. The correct grip and practice, piece of cake.

  7. #6
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaleBalkie View Post
    Best Glock for concealmen would obviously be the G26 because of its size. However, based on your physical size I see no issues with the G19 for you! Its really a personal choice!!!
    Agree, but I'll add the G23 in .40 as another option (same size as the G19).
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  8. #7
    cedarhill is offline Junior Member
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    I would say the 26 if very concealable and that is what I carry. But I have also carried the 19 and I can really shoot better with the 19.
    J

  9. #8
    glock4life is offline Junior Member
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    If I was limited to just one glock, it would be the 27. Only slightly heavier than my 26, with a more potent round! Its reliable, accurate and concealable.

  10. #9
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    Any time I see a post that starts "What's the best..." I roll my eyes.

    Any answer inevitably will be: "It depends..."

    It's like asking Coke or Pepsi, Ford or Chevy, Mac or PC, vanilla or chocolate. These things are always subjective. You need to try several either in a shop and/or at a range...preferably both.

    Concealed carry is serious business. You have to be ready to take another life, and that means opening yourself up to criminal and civil suit. It also means EXTENSIVE training in not only firing accuracy, but drawing, close quarter drills, and so much more.

    Concealed carry is more about your training than the firearm. I personally own multiple pistols because I have one for home defense, one for concealed carry, and a third for redundant training. But what works for me is based on my hand size, my hand strength, and my comfort level, with my lifestyle, the types of clothing I wear, the type of holster I own, the type of belt, etc.,etc., etc.

    To presume that I know which firearm will work best for you and all those criteria puts a very heavy burden out there. Go try several yourself and make a truly informed decision based on the above information and criteria. Don't base it off the words if some anonymous forum post in an online community exclusively.

    Don't get me wrong, asking questions is good, and getting suggestions can help narrow the fields bit, but if you've already narrowed to a Glock, you may as well try a few rentals to take you the rest of the way there. Good luck!

  11. #10
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    If I've read one of these, 'new shooter/carrier threads' I've read thousands! Somehow the majority opinion, although frequently incorrect, always comes out the same. 'Glock is great, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.' (It's like an internet gun forum mental disease!)

    First, you're going to need to get yourself some professional pistol training. Then, you're going to have to learn how to adjust your lifestyle in order to, 'dress AND move around the gun'. For whatever it's worth: If you shoot any Glock often enough it'll malfunction, too. Why? Because, 'perfect' they ain't. At one time or another I've had all of my Glocks malfunction; and I've seen many other shooters' Glocks malfunction, as well. (THAT is, 'Why' we teach clearance drills, and go to the trouble to actually number the different basic types of stoppages that occur: 1, 2, & 3.)

    What's the principal advantage to a beginner from using 9mm over 40 caliber? For many new shooters the recoil impulse is easier to manage. I'm a certified pistol instructor. Among other shooting disciplines I've been training people how to shoot pistols for more than two decades; and, to say that I've seen it all would be an understatement. Just so you know, THE LAST PISTOL I'd recommend to an essentially unskilled beginner is a Glock. Why? Because trigger safety, or not, a Glock pistol is always ready-to-go; AND, with a round in the chamber, (C-1) Glock's trigger safety is simply too easy to defeat.

    Before you completely write-off revolvers I'd suggest that you have someone who knows how to use one teach you the fundamentals of working both single and double-action triggers. (In the right hands - e.g. Jerry Miculek, Massad Ayoob, or me and hundreds, if not thousands, of other experienced pistol shooters - a revolver can be a fine weapon; AND, in this instructor's opinion, actually better to learn pistol shooting with than a Glock.

  12. #11
    VAMarine's Avatar
    VAMarine is offline Administrator
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    Just curious what your logic is to replacing a Glock that's ready to go with no safety with a revolver that's ready to go with no safety. Is it just the added weight of trigger pull? If that's the case I'd wager that a Glock with a heavier trigger installed might still be a better option as it can be later converted to the normal 4-6lbs..

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by VAMarine View Post
    Just curious what your logic is to replacing a Glock that's ready to go with no safety with a revolver that's ready to go with no safety. Is it just the added weight of trigger pull? If that's the case I'd wager that a Glock with a heavier trigger installed might still be a better option as it can be later converted to the normal 4-6lbs..
    +1. I don't understand giving away 9 rounds and fast reloads for a heavier trigger on a thicker gun. I took some professional training this last weekend. Every one of the instructors was carrying a semiautomatic. Everything from Glock to 1911.

  14. #13
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by VAMarine View Post
    Just curious what your logic is to replacing a Glock that's ready to go with no safety with a revolver that's ready to go with no safety. Is it just the added weight of trigger pull? If that's the case I'd wager that a Glock with a heavier trigger installed might still be a better option as it can be later converted to the normal 4-6lbs..
    Revolvers have typical 8 to 12# trigger pulls; AND the firing pin isn't preloaded at better than 75% of striking capacity. As officials at the New York State Police, and the Miami, FL Police Department realized when their agencies were considering a change to Glock pistols: For many decades the heavy trigger pull and constant-tension trigger throw built into all revolvers acts as an inherent revolver safety.

    THAT is, 'Why' Glock, GmbH was compelled to invent, both, the New York and Miami trigger springs. (It is, also, the reason for the hundreds - if not thousands - of law enforcement ND/AD's that took place all over America as different police agencies sought increased firepower and continued to switch to Glocks.)

  15. #14
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    Best Glock for concealed carry

    Wonder if this would've happened if he had a revolver with that heavier trigger pull:

    Child Shoots Officer at Reading Event/

    FWIW, I didn't know that revolver trigger weights were that high! Makes sense now when I shoot something with a 4# pull, but it made me double-take for a sec!

  16. #15
    VAMarine's Avatar
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    Fair enough, but if that's the only drawback then another that has a heavier trigger is probably still a better option than a revolver for carry. Regarding Glock and duty use...I'm torn. There are plenty of departments that issue Glock's and don't use the NY trigger etc. And don't have people putting unintended holes in things. BUT THAT BEING SAID nothing teaches better trigger manipulation than a double action revolver. Learn to shoot a model 10 etc in DA really well and you can shoot anything.

  17. #16
    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VAMarine View Post
    Fair enough, but if that's the only drawback then another that has a heavier trigger is probably still a better option than a revolver for carry. Regarding Glock and duty use...I'm torn. There are plenty of departments that issue Glock's and don't use the NY trigger etc. And don't have people putting unintended holes in things. BUT THAT BEING SAID nothing teaches better trigger manipulation than a double action revolver. Learn to shoot a model 10 etc in DA really well and you can shoot anything.
    Bolded text quoted for truth.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  18. #17
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by VAMarine View Post
    Fair enough, but if that's the only drawback then another that has a heavier trigger is probably still a better option than a revolver for carry. Regarding Glock and duty use...I'm torn. There are plenty of departments that issue Glock's and don't use the NY trigger etc. And don't have people putting unintended holes in things. BUT THAT BEING SAID nothing teaches better trigger manipulation than a double action revolver. Learn to shoot a model 10 etc in DA really well and you can shoot anything.
    Not really. Why? Because the pretensioned striker still needs to be taken into consideration; and remember all the front end slack in standard Glock triggers? Well, that slack has fooled a lot of people into believing a Glock's trigger is safe and will tolerate a certain amount of manipulation - Which, of course, it won't. MANY experienced pistoleros, including a few I have known, have treated a pretensioned striker-fired pistol too casually and ended up by putting, 'holes in things'.

    Learning how to double-action shoot a pistol takes a little work; (and some good instruction) but, once the skill has been acquired, I will agree that a pistol shooter should be able to safely and efficiently handle any pistol he picks up. One caveat, though: I'm of the opinion that there are many pistol shooters out there who carry a sidearm, AND have only poorly developed trigger finger discipline, and/or are predisposed to either, 'experimenting' or lapses of memory - Perhaps both!

    (Three of the last five ND/AD events I remember involved a gunman clearing a C-1 pistol. People are people; and stress is stress. Stress of any kind, be it social or tactical, can lead to both a lack of self-confidence or mental confusion - I've seen it happen! A new shooter with any manufacturer's pretensioned striker-fired pistol is, in my opinion, more likely to experience this sort of problem; AND, these people never seem to think that it's going to happen to them until it does!)

    THIS is the reason why, for many years now, I have taught firearm students that until the first four cardinal rules of gun safety become THOROUGHLY INGRAINED PERSONAL HABITS a shooter is NEVER going to be a genuinely safe gun handler! Memorizing the principal rules ain't good enough. Being able to simply repeat these rules doesn't really do a shooter any good. The truth is that only a shooter's HABITS are going to keep him and everyone around him safe while handling a gun(s).

    Which brings us back to the point I originally tried to make: The basic Glock design exacerbates all of the usual problems that are intrinsic to safe gun handling. Perhaps you can handle the Glock design well; perhaps I can, too; but THERE ARE owner/shooters out there who cannot. (On the one hand the human mind is NOT perfect; and, on the other, too many people just don't have enough respect - or inherent fear - for guns and what can happen when an inadvertent mistake is made!)

    Just between you and me: Personally, I never felt that I could handle pistols well until AFTER I learned how to shoot double-action.



    NOTE: Because this is the Internet; and I've been on gun forums long enough to know: I do NOT agree with the BATF's decision that the Glock pistol is a double-action gun. I do not! I regard the BATF's decision on the Glock design to be far more political than mechanical. Why? Because, historically, double-action handguns do not have either pretensioned strikers, or, 'short-throw' trigger mechanisms.

    In order for the Glock design to be considered as, 'double-action' the original historical definition has to be, both, broadly expanded and updated. Today's term, 'double-action' is, then, a matter of modern interpretation and, specifically in Glock's situation, is strongly influenced by extant political considerations. Strictly speaking, the Glock design is NOT a true double-action. The BATF deliberately interpreted the Glock design as being, 'double-action' in order to allow Glock pistols to be imported in violation of their own rules and regulations.

    Personally, I'm not a believer in playing so loosely with the truth of things. All this does is lead to a lot of other sloppy thinking, inconsistent (poor) decisions, and facile discriminatory rationale from which all American gun owners, ultimately, must suffer.

    (The BATF should have straightforwardly rewritten the conflicting statute.)

  19. #18
    Bobv's Avatar
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    glock 26, very good choice!

  20. #19
    ronmail65 is offline Member
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    I have a Glock 19 and have been wanting a 26 as a better CCW piece (meaning more convenient to carry / easier to conceal). I visited an LGS yesterday and they basically talked me out of it.

    The 26 is only about 1/4 shorter than the 19 -- not much smaller at all. Width is identical between the 2. The grip length is where you can make a difference IF you're comfortable with only 2 fingers on the grip and don't use an extension. Otherwise, if you add the extension, then you're at almost the same grip length as the 19. I prefer the extension. Now, the weight is different, but that's largely due to ammo - the 19 holding more rounds than the 26. Of course if you load less rounds in the 19 to match the 26, then the weight difference is neglible.

    So, is there enough differentiation or additional benefit for me to spend ~$500 (or more) to get a 26 when I already have a 19? My conclusion... no.

    I'm not knocking the 26, but if you have a 19 already I think it's hard to justify getting a 26.

  21. #20
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmail65 View Post
    ....... So, is there enough differentiation or additional benefit for me to spend ~$500 (or more) to get a 26 when I already have a 19? My conclusion .... no.
    My conclusion is, also, no. The G-26 is a much more difficult pistol to shoot straight than a G-19. How well, or not, someone carries a concealed pistol is as much about how a person dresses as it is about how a person moves while carrying.

    If it's a, 'primary'; and I expect that I might have to fight for my life with it, then, I won't go smaller than the G-19. (Which I think is a, mainly, 'perfect' CCW pistol.)



    Mine ~ I've been carrying it concealed, everyday, for the past 3 years; and I ain't been, 'made' yet!

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