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  1. #1
    onalandline's Avatar
    onalandline is offline Junior Member
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    Glock: The Rise of America's Gun...

    Glock: The Rise of America's Gun (2012).

    Has anyone read this book? I am about halfway through it. Interesting read. The author is kind of bizarre, but it is a good book.

  2. #2
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    Have not read it, its good though?

  3. #3
    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    I, too, am about half-done with it. My impression so far: kind of "gossipy". Author seems a bit snarky (and not necessarily in an entertaining way); not overtly anti-gun, but his use of certain terms leads me to believe that is his bent, and he is just keeping it behind a curtain while he writes the book. Seems like much of the info was gleaned from former Glock employees, which usually means a book that will have a bit of a negative/sensationalist slant.

    I've been working on it for about a month now, on and off. If I find a book is really interesting, I'll usually finish it in one or two days, but this one just isn't pulling me in.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  4. #4
    onalandline's Avatar
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    This is kind of an ususual book considering who the author is. I found it interesting. Took about 3 days to get through it.

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    Sounds to me he is off the mark to begin with as Glocks are made in Austria.........JJ

  6. #6
    onalandline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chessail77 View Post
    Sounds to me he is off the mark to begin with as Glocks are made in Austria.........JJ
    I think he knows that.

  7. #7
    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chessail77 View Post
    Sounds to me he is off the mark to begin with as Glocks are made in Austria.........JJ
    Nowadays, not all of them are made in Austria...

    They've been making frames here in the US for several years (and the frame is "the gun" as far as our Feds are concerned), although most (all?) of the Glock sold here are still partially assembled with imported parts. There are completely American made (stamped USA on the slide, and Glock US on the barrel hood) Glocks, but so far, they are only being sold in other countries.

    Here is a photo of two of my Glocks; the top one has the normal made-in-Austria frame, while the bottom one has a made-in-Smyrna-GA frame:



    I purchased the US-frame Glock more than three years ago, and I'm fairly sure it wasn't the first one to go out the door with a Smyrna-made frame.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  8. #8
    chessail77's Avatar
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    I knew they were assembled in Smyrna Ga. and they had plans to start manufacture of some components but did not know they had started.......still most are Austrian....America's gun would have to be IMHO a 1911 or S&W .38 revolver, a Thompson sub, a BAR but I digress and am taking away from the real subject which is the book mentioned above, which I suspect the author refers to the large quantity of Glocks in the US..........JJ

  9. #9
    northstar19 is offline Junior Member
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    DJ Niner, I think the author, Paul Barrett, is trying to be objective about firearms, walking the line right down the middle, to appeal to the broadest possible audience. However, to us, that may make him appear to be anti-gun sometimes. I am certain, though, that he does not approve of the NRA.

  10. #10
    denner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by northstar19 View Post
    However, to us, that may make him appear to be anti-gun sometimes. I am certain, though, that he does not approve of the NRA.
    Well, that would definitely lead me to suspect DJ's observation as correct.

  11. #11
    pic
    pic is online now Senior Member HGF Gold Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
    Nowadays, not all of them are made in Austria...

    They've been making frames here in the US for several years (and the frame is "the gun" as far as our Feds are concerned), although most (all?) of the Glock sold here are still partially assembled with imported parts. There are completely American made (stamped USA on the slide, and Glock US on the barrel hood) Glocks, but so far, they are only being sold in other countries.

    Here is a photo of two of my Glocks; the top one has the normal made-in-Austria frame, while the bottom one has a made-in-Smyrna-GA frame:



    I purchased the US-frame Glock more than three years ago, and I'm fairly sure it wasn't the first one to go out the door with a Smyrna-made frame.
    I don't see MADE IN SMYRNA

  12. #12
    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pic View Post
    I don't see MADE IN SMYRNA
    I guess you could say it's implied. Any Glock frame that is made and imported from another country would have to have similar markings to the top frame in the photo (country of manufacture). Frames made here in the U.S. do not require these import markings. As the bottom frame is only marked Smyrna, GA., it must have been made at Glock's facility in Smyrna.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  13. #13
    pic
    pic is online now Senior Member HGF Gold Member
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    I'm not a glock expert , I like the glock. I've seen them stamped every which way


    http://i1340.photobucket.com/albums/...ps8e42cb01.jpg

  14. #14
    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    I certainly don't claim any expert status, but I do have a lot of experience with them, and I've talked/corresponded with a lot of folks with direct company knowledge, such as factory technicians, Glock armorers, and others. In the case of the later USA-made pistols which are completely made here, they are stamped differently than the earlier frames that were used to assemble pistols with Austrian-made slides and barrels. Those later pistols can also be identified by their newer serial number layout, consisting of 4 letters and 3 numbers (such as the one in your photo; previous pistols were 3 letter and 3 numbers, and very old early-import pistols had 2 letters and 3 numbers). There are also a few pistol series' with special letter/number combos, mostly made for police departments or as commemorative models.

    One of the reasons that has been discussed to explain why Glock set up an American factory was to produce guns for export to other countries, as there are apparently laws prohibiting Austrian-manufactured Glocks from being exported to certain countries. I've heard that making them here in the USA gets around that problem, but if they are producing it for export (or possible export), they are back to square one -- they need to mark the country of manufacture on it, just like the Austrian-made guns imported to the USA. I'm thinking that explains the markings on the gun in your linked photo.

    And before you ask, no, I have no ironclad sources for most of this info, but I'm generally comfortable enough with the sourcing to use it as I understand it. I understand if other folks don't share that comfort level, or even if they've heard/seen other explanations for similar markings, that they wouldn't be likely to repeat the info from EITHER source, and I won't fault them for that. Finally, (insert deity of your choice here) knows I've been wrong before, and I have no reason to believe that I'll never be wrong again, so if you (or anyone else) has any solid info in this area, I'll be glad to run it past some of my sources, and if it checks out, modify my current understanding and explanations of the various markings. For instance, in this last year, I found out that on early Glock model 24 pistols (longslide .40 caliber) that were factory-ported, the slides were NOT marked "24C" like current versions. The box labels just had a "-P" added to the end of the model number, and that was apparently good enough I.D. for the first few batches of ported G24 pistols (maybe until they could modify the slide stamping dies to reflect the change).
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  15. #15
    Cait43's Avatar
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    Glock is America's gun only in the minds of Glock owners...

    Makes one wonder how gun owners ever got along before 1980.....

  16. #16
    pic
    pic is online now Senior Member HGF Gold Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
    I certainly don't claim any expert status, but I do have a lot of experience with them, and I've talked/corresponded with a lot of folks with direct company knowledge, such as factory technicians, Glock armorers, and others. In the case of the later USA-made pistols which are completely made here, they are stamped differently than the earlier frames that were used to assemble pistols with Austrian-made slides and barrels. Those later pistols can also be identified by their newer serial number layout, consisting of 4 letters and 3 numbers (such as the one in your photo; previous pistols were 3 letter and 3 numbers, and very old early-import pistols had 2 letters and 3 numbers). There are also a few pistol series' with special letter/number combos, mostly made for police departments or as commemorative models.

    One of the reasons that has been discussed to explain why Glock set up an American factory was to produce guns for export to other countries, as there are apparently laws prohibiting Austrian-manufactured Glocks from being exported to certain countries. I've heard that making them here in the USA gets around that problem, but if they are producing it for export (or possible export), they are back to square one -- they need to mark the country of manufacture on it, just like the Austrian-made guns imported to the USA. I'm thinking that explains the markings on the gun in your linked photo.

    And before you ask, no, I have no ironclad sources for most of this info, but I'm generally comfortable enough with the sourcing to use it as I understand it. I understand if other folks don't share that comfort level, or even if they've heard/seen other explanations for similar markings, that they wouldn't be likely to repeat the info from EITHER source, and I won't fault them for that. Finally, (insert deity of your choice here) knows I've been wrong before, and I have no reason to believe that I'll never be wrong again, so if you (or anyone else) has any solid info in this area, I'll be glad to run it past some of my sources, and if it checks out, modify my current understanding and explanations of the various markings. For instance, in this last year, I found out that on early Glock model 24 pistols (longslide .40 caliber) that were factory-ported, the slides were NOT marked "24C" like current versions. The box labels just had a "-P" added to the end of the model number, and that was apparently good enough I.D. for the first few batches of ported G24 pistols (maybe until they could modify the slide stamping dies to reflect the change).
    I fully agree, I mean no disrespect.
    On any given day in the factory the "guys who wear ties" could decide to " hey we have to start putting made in the USA on the guns"
    Probably for the reason's you gave

  17. #17
    Philco is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by onalandline View Post
    Glock: The Rise of America's Gun (2012).

    Has anyone read this book? I am about halfway through it. Interesting read. The author is kind of bizarre, but it is a good book.

    I read the book a few months ago. I'm not a Glock fan to begin with, and reading that book and about Gaston Glocks business practices and personal issues certainly does not make me any more motivated to buy a Glock. The book was fairly interesting.

  18. #18
    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pic View Post
    (snip)
    On any given day in the factory the "guys who wear ties" could decide to " hey we have to start putting made in the USA on the guns"
    (snip)
    I agree, and have often thought that stuff like this is/was probably decided with a coin toss or roll of some dice, given the frequency of the changes...

    "It's Monday, time to change something!"
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  19. #19
    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cait43 View Post
    Glock is America's gun only in the minds of Glock owners...

    Makes one wonder how gun owners ever got along before 1980.....
    Well, them and the approximately 65% of police departments that use Glocks (yeah, I know, those are Glock's numbers, but i haven't seen anything to disprove it; they are REALLY common on cop duty belts). That's the kind of market saturation that most companies only have wet dreams about.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  20. #20
    TAPnRACK's Avatar
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    Wouldn't have anything to do with Glock having a LE program where their dirt cheap? Especially since a lot of Dept's are financially challanged?

    Not slamming Glocks... one is on my duty belt, but I know their price break makes em' much less expensive as other makes... which may attribute to so many LE dept's using them...

    ...which is smart since the average person figures if LEO's use them, they must be the best handgun made.

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