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  1. #1
    Rooky is offline Junior Member
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    Question for Glock owners!

    I currently shoot a glock 22 (.40) it the one issue by the department i currently work for. Up until 3 months ago i only went shooting 1 a year (mandatory requal) 3 months ago i became very interested in shooting so i started dry firing at home 4 to 5 times a week for at least an hour, after a few blisters, broken firing pin (unsafe i know) and aiming at a targets at various distances i managed to improve my aim at different distances by at least one inch and even more at a closer range. im happy with the improvement however i want to get event better (hopefully ipsc better) Now this is the question anyone that owns a glock 9 mm can you give me your advise and experiences with this pistol? Take into account that even though i technically been shooting for a few years i still consider myself new at this. Any advise helps

  2. #2
    Rooky is offline Junior Member
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    stupid question?

  3. #3
    BeefyBeefo's Avatar
    BeefyBeefo is offline Senior Member
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    If you like the feel of the Glock 22 and are used to the trigger, a 9mm version (Glock 17 would be the same frame) will simply be easier to shoot. It's the same gun with a different slide/barrel/magazine.

    I've owned and shot many of the different Glocks. They're not my favorite for all applications, but for off duty, I'm finding it's hard to beat my G26. I've tried many different options and keep going back to it.

    Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    I have several Glock 9mms in various sizes, and I also own a couple of .40s, including a Glock 22 in .40 caliber like the one you are issued.

    If you compare them side-by-side, the .40 caliber Glocks will recoil and bounce a little bit more than the 9mm Glocks. If you are used to using the .40, then the 9mm will feel weaker/less powerful when fired, but it still would serve you well as a weapon for practice, as well as competition uses.

    The best tips I can give you is to continue your dry-fire practice, and try to get to the point where the sights do not move or jerk at all when the firing pin releases. If you hold the sights on target as steadily as you can, and concentrate on holding that alignment while gently squeezing the trigger until the gun fires, your shot groups will get smaller and (probably) closer to the target's center. Once you can shoot good tight clusters of shots almost every time you try, then begin to speed-up your shooting, so each shot takes less time from start to finish.

    Good luck!
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  5. #5
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rooky View Post
    stupid question?
    Not a stupid question at all...

    I own a Glock 17 which is the same model as your Glock 22 only in 9mm. Your G22 should suffice, if you want to get a gun with reduced recoil for better shot placement (Mr. 9mm) and more capacity (+2 = 17 bullets) then trade your gun in for a 17 (if your department allows)

    However the G17 and G22 are pretty balanced and you don't gain a whole lot, but you do gain enough for me to have originally chosen the 17 over the 22.

    Many of your fellow officers however carry .40 caliber Im pretty sure its the most common round in US law enforcement (dont quote me on that) it is at least in my state. If all your buddies have .40 might be good to have what they have case you be held up with them and you can share ammo supply...

    Overall my opinion the G22 is less than equal to G17. The choice comes down to will you choose:

    G22 .40 more "stopping power" and sharing same beloved .40 cal with your comrades
    G17 9mm more bullets and less recoil for increased shot placement

    P.s. or you could try a Glock 21sf in .45 acp... THATS a freakin cannon bro

  6. #6
    Rooky is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks a lot guys, great advise from all of you which i will follow! Dj Niner i will work on those recommendations to improve my shooting skills. Thanks again boys!

  7. #7
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Go back to the fundamentals. Breathing; trigger pull, sight picture.

  8. #8
    FNISHR is offline Member
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    Packard gave you good advice. I've been very satisfied with my G17, which I have a little over 2500 rounds through now, and I'm taking a class on pistol accuracy tomorrow at a range near me. I don't know how common these courses are, but they'll be around somewhere.

  9. #9
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    If you Google 10 meter competitions, you should find advice on slow fire shooting.

    The 10 meter pellet competitions and the 10 meter .22 competions demand the most of the shooter's steadiness. But these are slow fire only. So you will need to drill on fast fire too. But do both.

    In any case you need to train yourself to focus on the front sight and to work to control the front sight during the trigger pull. You can do a lot of good using dry fire techniques on both of these points.

    Pretty standard for breath control is to take two deep breaths and let them out and then take a third deep breath and let out about half the air and then hold your breath while aiming and shooting. But you neet to aim and fire within 5 seconds of the last breath or you aim will start to dance around on you. I don't know the physiology of this, but the longer and harder you try the more the front sight will move around. You are better served by letting out your breath and lowering the weapon and starting over.

    This is the same for rifle competitions too. It was the technique taught to me when I was on our high school rifle team and it applies well to pistol shooting too.

  10. #10
    recoilguy's Avatar
    recoilguy is offline Senior Member
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    Trigger control is very important in shooting a hand gun. If you can master control of the trigger, the rest will be much easier.

    RCG

  11. #11
    Rooky is offline Junior Member
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    Holy smokes! i ve learnt more here in one day than i did the past seven years. I tried asking around at work but people do not seem to be interested in helping a new guy or sharing their techniques, strategies or little secrets, its very frustrating! I just want to get good at it and eventually share it with others but it seem s that im one of the few that thinks like that. Thanks again boys!! Im so grateful for your all of your help!!

  12. #12
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Try this in slow fire:

    Slowly pull the trigger while watching the front sight. Constantly watch the point of aim, especially the front sight. With practice the trigger pull will not move the front sight around. That is trigger control. Practice this slowly and then increase the speed as your skills improve.

    Making sure that the sight picture does not move around is another separate skill to work on.

    You can do both of these as dry fire exercises. But make sure you take the appropriate safety precautions before doing so.

  13. #13
    recoilguy's Avatar
    recoilguy is offline Senior Member
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    Packard is correct, here are 2 ways to see if you are moving when pulling the trigger besides just looking at the sites.
    1) If you have a laser turn it on and see if it jumps through the pull
    2) Put a dime on top of the slide....pull the trigger if youa ren't still you will know.

    RCG

  14. #14
    Jed Henson is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Packard View Post
    If you Google 10 meter competitions, you should find advice on slow fire shooting.

    The 10 meter pellet competitions and the 10 meter .22 competions demand the most of the shooter's steadiness. But these are slow fire only. So you will need to drill on fast fire too. But do both.

    In any case you need to train yourself to focus on the front sight and to work to control the front sight during the trigger pull. You can do a lot of good using dry fire techniques on both of these points.

    Pretty standard for breath control is to take two deep breaths and let them out and then take a third deep breath and let out about half the air and then hold your breath while aiming and shooting. But you neet to aim and fire within 5 seconds of the last breath or you aim will start to dance around on you. I don't know the physiology of this, but the longer and harder you try the more the front sight will move around. You are better served by letting out your breath and lowering the weapon and starting over.

    This is the same for rifle competitions too. It was the technique taught to me when I was on our high school rifle team and it applies well to pistol shooting too.
    Huh, interesting. I was taught to squeeze off the shot with a rifle at the bottom of the breath (i.e., fully exhaled, before you inhale). I'll have to give your method a try.

  15. #15
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jed Henson View Post
    Huh, interesting. I was taught to squeeze off the shot with a rifle at the bottom of the breath (i.e., fully exhaled, before you inhale). I'll have to give your method a try.
    They may both work. I think my way leaves you more comfortable. I never tried your method and I will give it a try. In any case I think the 5 second rule will still be in place. My front sights move around after 5 seconds and my only option is to lower the weapon and try again. For that reason, in a confrontation I would not bring my weapon up to aim unless I was ready to fire. If I bring the gun to aim, I'm going to fire.

  16. #16
    kilo11 is offline Junior Member
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    Rooky, as you found out not all L.E folks are gun savy. Go talk to your firearms instructors. Tell them what you just told all of us. Trust me we love to help fellow officers who are interested in improving there skills. Here is another huge secrect, start the process to become an instructor. You never learn more then when you teach. Armorers are pretty cool folks to hand around with too. I was an instructor when my department transitioned from revolvers to Glocks. The team and I were at the range 18 months straight getting everybody up to speed. I got to go to the Glock instructor's acdemy, armorers class and the advanced armorers class. Plus I took my L.E. basic class from one of the best gunsmiths in the world, Ted Yost (I can not say enough good things about Mr. Yost) formerly of Gunsight. All that and you still get to keep the best job in the world. Just something to think about. My issue gun is Glock 19. The Glock 17 is hard to beat. Good luck and stay safe.

  17. #17
    Rooky is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the guidance kilo, i am currently looking into it, it sounds great, i can just imagine showing up to work to the range (does it get any better than that??? getting paid to shoot, teach and to be around guns?) I will eventually travel down to the US to get some courses and training but for now ill talk to the firearms instructors and ask for their guidance and advise. Thanks a lot kilo11!

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