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  1. #1
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    Steel guide rods for Glock

    Anybody have one that they would like to reccommend? My brothers used glock had a crack in the guide rod and instead of just going back to the gunstore we are just ordering a steel guide rod, unless someone objects to them being bad?

    Glockmeister had some good deals, are they cool or is another place preferable?

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  3. #2
    zhurdan's Avatar
    zhurdan is offline Senior Member
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    A cracked guide rod is usually caused by user error in the disassembly process. No offense, not saying that's what happened in his case. Being it was used, who knows what may have happened to it. They occasionally do a come-a-part after 20k rounds though, so I hear.

    The steel guide rods claim that they take "torque" out of the pistol, which in my opinion tightens the gun up. The beauty of the Glock is that it is loose enough to function better than a tight tolerance gun. I've also heard that the steel guide rods improve accuracy, but for the most part, Glocks are more accurate than their users to begin with.

    If he want's a steel one, go for it, but for me, it's factory same-same plastic ones. Let us know if there are any malfunctions after the change.

  4. #3
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    I guess the correct terminology for what happened is that the rounded edge of the rod "chipped"

    I was the one who took it apart not my brother so I can rule out that it was him and Ive been taking apart my glock for awhile now so it doubt it was me

    Ordering it tonite hopefully it comes soon, report on way

  5. #4
    TedDeBearFrmHell's Avatar
    TedDeBearFrmHell is offline Senior Member
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    i have been reading up on the problem with glocks and guide rod failures..... just another reason i dont trust the plastic pistol.... thank god for my metal taurus with the original stainless steel guide rod.....over 20k rounds and never a failure or breakage of anykind.... guess its to be expected with plastic disposable guns


  6. #5
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    Well idk,

    My Glock 17 I bought brand new never had any problems of any sort

    This particular Glock 19 is a law enforcement trade in, denoted by the magazines and identified by the records at the gun store, so this one has seen some action no doubt. A metal guide rod is preferable though I can agree

  7. #6
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeleinen1 View Post
    Anybody have one that they would like to reccommend? My brothers used glock had a crack in the guide rod and instead of just going back to the gunstore we are just ordering a steel guide rod, unless someone objects to them being bad?

    (snip)
    In my experience, the main problem with steel guide rods, is folks start messing with the spring weights, trying to "improve" over the stock rod and spring. Then they start getting stoppages, and complain about other things (like the ammo or lubricant) until they change back to a stock spring and all their problems go away. As is often said, if it ain't broke, don't "fix" it.

    However, in your case, it IS broke, so you want to replace it. The various steel rods will work okay, but I'd recommend getting one that will use the factory spring, if there's one available. If not, stick to as close to the factory spring weight as possible for reliable functioning.

    Right now, a couple hundred competition shooters who read the above are saying "That's a bunch of BS! I've been running a (insert ridiculously light spring weight here) pound spring for years, and I've never had a bit of trouble!" And that's probably true, once they got their mouse-fart target loads tuned to match the spring. For most everyone else, varying spring weights in an otherwise stock gun seems to cause more problems than it solves.

    I've owned a bunch of Glocks, new and used, over the last 20+ years, and I've never chipped/cracked/broke a factory recoil spring assembly. I've been told that chipping the rod rim usually happens when someone removes the slide, and then immediately re-installs it without adjusting the way the recoil spring assembly is sitting in the half-moon cutout under the barrel. When you reassemble it from scratch, like when you're done cleaning the weapon, the manual warns to make sure the rod's rim is fully seated in the half-moon cutout before replacing the slide on the frame. However, when you first remove the slide assembly from the frame in normal disassembly, the rod is only partially seated in the cutout. If the slide is then replaced on the frame without re-seating the rod's rim fully into the cutout, the rim catches on something during assembly or when the slide is first retracted, and it chips the rod rim. Most folks don't connect the act of removing the slide, and then immediately putting it back on the frame, as something that might damage a part, but apparently, it can.

    Personally, I don't think the Glock factory recoil spring assemblies are very expensive, so I just keep a spare of each size in my gun bag. I've never needed one, but if I ever do, I'm good-to-go. I've also been told that if you break one, Glock will sometimes mail you one for free, if you call the right number in their telephone maze (Tech Services maybe? I'm not sure). If there is a Glock Sport Shooting Foundation (GSSF) competition in your area, one of the perks of being a GSSF member and attending the match is a Glock armorer is available to look-over your gun for free, and replace and worn or broken parts at no charge. I did this once at a GSSF match, but everything was fine on my guns, so nothing was replaced.

    Please be aware that some of the metal rod assemblies don't capture the spring (so it's easy to change spring weights), so if the rod gets away from you during takedown or reassembly, it can fly a surprising distance. If you want a captured spring assembly, look for this in the product description.

    Hope this was helpful.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  8. #7
    zhurdan's Avatar
    zhurdan is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeleinen1 View Post
    I guess the correct terminology for what happened is that the rounded edge of the rod "chipped"

    I was the one who took it apart not my brother so I can rule out that it was him and Ive been taking apart my glock for awhile now so it doubt it was me

    Ordering it tonite hopefully it comes soon, report on way
    That's why I mentioned the "used" part. Who knows what some other person did to it.

    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
    In my experience, the main problem with steel guide rods, is folks start messing with the spring weights, trying to "improve" over the stock rod and spring. Then they start getting stoppages, and complain about other things (like the ammo or lubricant) until they change back to a stock spring and all their problems go away. As is often said, if it ain't broke, don't "fix" it.

    However, in your case, it IS broke, so you want to replace it. The various steel rods will work okay, but I'd recommend getting one that will use the factory spring, if there's one available. If not, stick to as close to the factory spring weight as possible for reliable functioning.

    Right now, a couple hundred competition shooters who read the above are saying "That's a bunch of BS! I've been running a (insert ridiculously light spring weight here) pound spring for years, and I've never had a bit of trouble!" And that's probably true, once they got their mouse- target loads tuned to match the spring. For most everyone else, varying spring weights in an otherwise stock gun seems to cause more problems than it solves.

    I've owned a bunch of Glocks, new and used, over the last 20+ years, and I've never chipped/cracked/broke a factory recoil spring assembly. I've been told that chipping the rod rim usually happens when someone removes the slide, and then immediately re-installs it without adjusting the way the recoil spring assembly is sitting in the half-moon cutout under the barrel. When you reassemble it from scratch, like when you're done cleaning the weapon, the manual warns to make sure the rod's rim is fully seated in the half-moon cutout before replacing the slide on the frame. However, when you first remove the slide assembly from the frame in normal disassembly, the rod is only partially seated in the cutout. If the slide is then replaced on the frame without re-seating the rod's rim fully into the cutout, the rim catches on something during assembly or when the slide is first retracted, and it chips the rod rim. Most folks don't connect the act of removing the slide, and then immediately putting it back on the frame, as something that might damage a part, but apparently, it can.

    Personally, I don't think the Glock factory recoil spring assemblies are very expensive, so I just keep a spare of each size in my gun bag. I've never needed one, but if I ever do, I'm good-to-go. I've also been told that if you break one, Glock will sometimes mail you one for free, if you call the right number in their telephone maze (Tech Services maybe? I'm not sure). If there is a Glock Sport Shooting Foundation (GSSF) competition in your area, one of the perks of being a GSSF member and attending the match is a Glock armorer is available to look-over your gun for free, and replace and worn or broken parts at no charge. I did this once at a GSSF match, but everything was fine on my guns, so nothing was replaced.

    Please be aware that some of the metal rod assemblies don't capture the spring (so it's easy to change spring weights), so if the rod gets away from you during takedown or reassembly, it can fly a surprising distance. If you want a captured spring assembly, look for this in the product description.

    Hope this was helpful.
    Hahaha, you said mouse faaaaart

    Same thing I've heard. Taking the gun apart and not paying attention, equals broken stuff.

  9. #8
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    Thanks for the info DJ Niner

    Based off of your post, I just ordered a factory glock guide rod. Up until this point I couldn't find any of the regualr factory model ones only the steel versions... Glockstore is where i purchased

  10. #9
    Handgun World's Avatar
    Handgun World is offline Junior Member
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    I used to be a "gamer" that changed out my recoil spring guide rods to steel ones to play with the spring weights. Once I realized that didn't make me any better of a shooter, I quite doing that and went back to factory guide rod and spring assemblies. But I've never had a problem with either, never chipped or cracked the factory plastic recoil spring assembly either. I have 3 Glocks each has 5,000 plus rounds through them, recoil spring assembly changed once in each.

  11. #10
    SMann is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedDeBearFrmHell View Post
    i have been reading up on the problem with glocks and guide rod failures..... just another reason i dont trust the plastic pistol.... guess its to be expected with plastic disposable guns

    For a guy that doesn't have a Glock and doesn't like Glocks, you sure spend a lot of time in the Glock sub-forum. You're also reading about Glock guide rods and kabooms? (saw in other thread) Either you secretly have Glock envy or you're trying to justify your opinions by researching anything negative about the brand. Enjoy your quest. (Or just buy one and get it over with.)

  12. #11
    paratrooper is online now Senior Member
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    Nothing wrong with a Glock. Plenty of police depts. use them. They don't buy um cause they're the cheapest.

    Most of the "problems" associated with Glocks, are user oriented. People can't keep their fingers off the trigger when not shooting.

  13. #12
    TedDeBearFrmHell's Avatar
    TedDeBearFrmHell is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMann View Post
    For a guy that doesn't have a Glock and doesn't like Glocks, you sure spend a lot of time in the Glock sub-forum. You're also reading about Glock guide rods and kabooms? (saw in other thread) Either you secretly have Glock envy or you're trying to justify your opinions by researching anything negative about the brand. Enjoy your quest. (Or just buy one and get it over with.)
    as a former ffl dealer i have owned a metric butt ton of glocks.... i owned them BEFORE the had the ny trigger...i have uninstalled ny triggers in about 30 glocks for friends. i dont cruise the glock sub forum, i do read the active topics and when there is doubt in my mind, i do research on my own by going to other sources of info, pro and con. i do not hide my opinions but i also try to temper my thoughts.... its no secret that i do not like the gun, and its no secret what guns i do like, but that doesnt stop me from passing on info that i have uncovered, good and bad. if the glock sub-forum is only for sycophants, post it in the rules, till then, deal with it.


  14. #13
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    chessail77 is offline Senior Member
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    Best bet is to replace it with another factory guide rod ...there is a reason they use them and it isn't the cost......although I personally don't care for them (Glocks) they are noted for their reliability and that is with the plastic rods....JJ

  15. #14
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    I have tried them in both my G20 and G22. The OEM plastic actually seems to work better for all but the hottest reloads. I do not believe the steel rods are needed per se just a heavier recoil spring for my application.
    Another plus for the OEM is buy two for less than one steel recoil assembly and have an extra.

  16. #15
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWARREN123 View Post
    ...

    Another plus for the OEM is buy two for less than one steel recoil assembly and have an extra.
    Win!
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  17. #16
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeleinen1 View Post
    Anybody have one that they would like to reccommend? My brothers used glock had a crack in the guide rod and instead of just going back to the gunstore we are just ordering a steel guide rod, unless someone objects to them being bad? Glockmeister had some good deals, are they cool or is another place preferable?
    Yeah, for the past 10 years I've used Wolff Gunsprings non-captured steel guide rods in my Glock pistols. I have an assortment of different springs; (mostly heavier) but much of the time I stick with factory standard weights. It's been my experience that most people think they know what solid metal guide rods do in a Glock when, in fact, they have only a limited grasp of what actually takes place.

    Personally I wouldn't own a Glock without a steel rod in it. Why? Well, it all started when I bought an early Model 21 with the old #4256 trigger bar in it. That G-21 wouldn't feed, cycle, or return-to-battery worth a crap without a metal rod in it. Polymer frames vibrate rather violently when the pistol is fired; what a metal rod does is to stabilize the frame, smooth out slide travel, and help keep the frame parts in tighter contact with their associated slide components. Slide movement - and, perhaps, speed - is more certain and forceful. A Glock with a steel rod has a much stronger impulse to return-to-battery; and, on a Glock, a strong return-to-battery is a very good thing.

    When Glock, Inc. finally came out with the new improved #4256-1 trigger bar for the G-21 life got easier for me; and, after replacement, my Glocks worked very well. (My occasional, 'Glock smiles' on fired brass also went away!) At this juncture I, probably didn't need to use Wolff metal rods anymore; but, my formerly troublesome G-21's were running so smoothly and trouble-free that I decided to leave them in place.

    Was this a good idea? Yes, I think it is! A lot of people have had trouble with their new Gen3 and Gen4 Model 19's. With a light polish applied to my G-19's extractor, and a Wolff guide rod, my new G-19 has run flawlessly through it's first 3,000 fired rounds. In my opinion, if your brother's Glock is a Gen3 or earlier, he will be better off with a steel guide rod installed in that gun. Does he really need a steel rod? No. Will he, ultimately, be better off? Yes, in my experience he will.

    Springs for GLOCK Semi-Auto Pistols

  18. #17
    Brevard13 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedDeBearFrmHell View Post
    i have been reading up on the problem with glocks and guide rod failures..... just another reason i dont trust the plastic pistol.... thank god for my metal taurus with the original stainless steel guide rod.....over 20k rounds and never a failure or breakage of anykind.... guess its to be expected with plastic disposable guns

    That's funny, because I wouldn't take a crap on a crappy Taurus.

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