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  1. #1
    atlas_drums is offline Junior Member
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    Gun Jammed for the first time

    I was at the range today shooting my new Glock 23, when I experienced my first jam. I got the G 23 fairly recently, and have so far put about 150 rounds through it. It was firing smoothly and accurately until the last round at the range today. It ejected the previous casing properly, but it doesn't seem like the last round went up the ramp properly and got stuck.

    My question is, is this a normal part of the break-in process for a handgun? I was told that it takes about 250 or so rounds to break in the gun. I've also field stripped and cleaned the gun after every visit to the range.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    There are far more knowledgeable people on here who can comment, but I can say that my Kimber supposedly needed 500 rds to be broken in. I would have to look at my logbook to know for sure, but I am somewhere around 1800 without the first FTF or FTE on my first Kimber, and a little over 400 rds on the newest one, again with no failures. From all I have read and heard Glocks supposedly never FTF or FTE even when abused,limp wristed, or not cleaned. As always YMMV

  3. #3
    DjSaneR's Avatar
    DjSaneR is offline Member
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    I wouldn't worry too much unless the jam is consistant. With only 150rds it's expected. If it happens again I'd try a different mag.

  4. #4
    atlas_drums is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the feedback. I heard the same thing about Glocks...you can abuse the crap out of them and not worry about it. (Not that I would do that) That's the only reason I found it strange. Of course, each situation is different.

  5. #5
    SMann is offline Member
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    When I first got my G19 I detail stripped it. While cleaning it I found a little piece of loose plastic in the slide that was keeping the striker from moving freely. I'm sure everybody has seen that little ridge of material that forms at the seams when something is made in a mold. I think it's called flashing or something. That's what my stray piece of material appeared to be. My point is I don't assume anything when purchasing a firearm new or used. If I can't do a complete inspection of every part, I'll take it to a professional who can. That alone will eliminate a lot of questions. Good luck.

  6. #6
    wjh2657's Avatar
    wjh2657 is offline Member
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    Key word here is "new". Have somebody that knows (I am my own armorer)inspect it and see if there isn't something "extra" sticking around from casting/extruding. Also have them check all of your mags. It is rare but even a Glock (I own several) could have some flashing from molding/extruding.

    I have found very small "extras" even in machined pieces of some of my more expensive guns. The people who build/assemble guns on the production line are not gunsmiths and even the "finishers" are not always as skilled or as astute as they should be. If it is something that can be remedied, do it and then carry with confidence.

  7. #7
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    I bet that if you disassemble your Glock and clean it really well, with particular attention paid to the barrel and feed ramp, and the magazine(s), the mis-feed problem won't show up again.
    I know that Glocks are supposed to be indestructible, but every gun needs a good cleaning now and then. I suggest a detail-strip cleaning about every 200, and certainly after 500, rounds.

  8. #8
    atlas_drums is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the feedback guys. The issue hasn't shown up again, and I've put several hundred more rounds through it.

  9. #9
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Some issues are not reproducible. 1 of my Berettas didn't completely extract a casing at about the 250 round mark. It irritated the hell out of me, as that was to be my carry gun. Over just a couple of months, I put 2000 rounds thru it to see if it would happen again. Never did. I was actually tired of only shooting that gun every week or so.

    I have 2500 rounds thru it now - never happened again.

  10. #10
    hetzer is offline Junior Member
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    Malfunction

    The Glock is prone to failure to feed if it is not held firmly enough (limp wristed) or grip too low on the frame. Can happen to anyone. Just keep a good grip and as high up on the frame as you're hand will go.

  11. #11
    wjh2657's Avatar
    wjh2657 is offline Member
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    All semi autos (except the toggle feeds (Luger, Mauser,etc.) are prone to FTF if limpwristed, not just the Glock. I had a BERSA Thunder .380 that could only be fired reliably from a eye height straight out in front of you hold, with every muscle in your body locked. Needless to say, this isn't the usual SD hold. I also had a series 80 Colt Officer's Model that had similar problems. Semi autos are designed to be held firmly with a locked wrist and arm (contrary to the ever popular Gangsta hold seen on TV.) I carried semiAutos (1911s) for so long that I still automatically assume a locked wrist and forearm hold even though I now carry a revolver.

    Just let your Glock know who is in charge by holding it firmly. I have a G23 with over 2000 rounds through it and have never had a FTF or FTE.

  12. #12
    Shin71's Avatar
    Shin71 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tropicmaster View Post
    There are far more knowledgeable people on here who can comment, but I can say that my Kimber supposedly needed 500 rds to be broken in. I would have to look at my logbook to know for sure, but I am somewhere around 1800 without the first FTF or FTE on my first Kimber, and a little over 400 rds on the newest one, again with no failures. From all I have read and heard Glocks supposedly never FTF or FTE even when abused,limp wristed, or not cleaned. As always YMMV
    Breaking in a gun; it is probably safe to assume that 500 rounds is a good basis. Were you using reloads, factory reloads, plinking ammo, name brand... I have had issues with factory reloads in one of my newer Smiths. I have had no issues using the same ammo in a new Glock 23 I own.

    I wouldn't worry about it unless it continues past the 500 round mark and then I would contact Glock. They seem to have good customer service.

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