Springfield Vs Glock

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    1. #1
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      Springfield Vs Glock

      Can someone please explain to me the difference between the action on the Springfield XD's vs the Glock. I have seen the XD referred to to as single action, and the Glock a double action. I have shot both, and they seem very similar. I just want a better understanding of what is under the hood of each. Thanks you.

    2. #2
      Member jimmy's Avatar
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      they are neither single action or double action in terms of design..They are both a striker design (a big firing pin with embedded safety and no hammer)...Now in terms of functionality, they both function like a single action in terms of if you have a missfire, you can not just keep pulling the trigger as a double action, you have to rack the slide to cock the striker and fire again, similar to a "single action" type of functionality.

      As for the trigger pull, it is some how between a typical double action (which is usually on the heavy side) and the single action (whic is on the light side)..somewhere in between. Both guns are very similar in design and functionality, with one extra safety feature in the back of the grip in springfields..

      Hope this have helped.

    3. #3
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      Well....

      Technically you can have a single action striker fired gun ala HK P7 and XD as the pulling the trigger causes one action, the release of the striker.

      The Glock mechanism is partially cocked by the cycling of the slide while the XD is fully cocked by the cycling of the slide. With the partially cocked Glock, the pulling of the trigger takes over and fully cocks the mechanism prior to release.

      That is why the XD is referred to as single action. The Glock is neither single or double, hence the term "Safe Action"

    4. #4
      Member jimmy's Avatar
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      Thanks VAMarine for the detailed deep dive explanation..Interesting to know.

    5. #5
      Member SaltyDog's Avatar
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      Come one guys - get with the program it is the GA Glock Action

    6. #6
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      The XD is SA because each cycle of the slide fully cocks the firing mechanism. It just doesn't have a hammer like a more "traditional" SA.

      The Glock isn't an SA because as mentioned above, it's not fully cocked by the cycling of the slide. It isn't a DA either, since it's trigger doesn't compress the striker from a fully uncompressed position, and it does not have two different methods of firing. Some have called the Glocks action a "double-acton only" which it closely approximates. I just call it a "pre-cocked striker-fired" handgun, and leave it at that......

    7. #7
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      Interesting reading on the subject at hand:

      http://www.handguninfo.com/Archive/w...com/xddasa.htm

    8. #8
      Junior Member spongebobmac's Avatar
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      both are great guns

    9. #9
      Banned Big Boomer's Avatar
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      Two of the worst AD I have ever seen have been with Springfields junkers.

      The XD is fully cocked when charged. Dropping one on the muzzel will cause it to fire from inertia of the drop stricker and this is what knocked them out of the police market.

      A cocked and locked Springer 1911 was dropped in the lobby of the range a while back and it too went off and after we got it out of the ceiling blocks we found it to be still cocked and locked. It too landed on the muzzel and the inertia of the firing struck the primer and ignighted it.

      Glocks are only partially tensioned cocked in battery and you can slam it with a sledge hammer on the muzzel and it will not fire. In fact reducing the stricker spring to a 4 pounder eliminates the AD chances if the stricker should get loose because there will not be enough energy to hit the primer hard enough. This will also reduce the trigger pull as it is controlled by the stock 5.5 stricker spring. You have just got to keep your booger hook off the bang button and all is cool with a 4 lb stricker spring like the wolf and others.

    10. #10
      Member hi im drummer03's Avatar
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      Both guns are indeed great models. Either one of them would be great guns for CCW.

      XD-Pros: Sub has tactical rail,few additional external safties,Lifetime Warranty,also extended mag in box,(although it makes gun same length as standard model),Few more goodies in the box
      Cons: More safeties to engage,new design than Glock(track record)

      Glock-Pros: Name,durability,combat ready,many parts available,interchangable between same caliber models,non rusting coating,Forward canted grip for beginners which glock says it easier for them to point and aim
      Cons: Not as many safeties for newer gun owners,big for smaller hands,no
      tactical rail,no mag extension from factory

    11. #11
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      I don't claim to know much about handguns, but I consider the safeties on the XD to be a pro. The only time the safeties are disengaged is when you are holding the gun ready to fire it.

    12. #12
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      Quote Originally Posted by VAMarine View Post
      Well....

      Technically you can have a single action striker fired gun ala HK P7 and XD as the pulling the trigger causes one action, the release of the striker.

      The Glock mechanism is partially cocked by the cycling of the slide while the XD is fully cocked by the cycling of the slide. With the partially cocked Glock, the pulling of the trigger takes over and fully cocks the mechanism prior to release.

      That is why the XD is referred to as single action. The Glock is neither single or double, hence the term "Safe Action"
      That is exactly correct.

    13. #13
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      I have and like both, but never really understood the difference in the way that the striker is operated. Good info.

    14. #14
      Senior Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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      First off, you must understand what the term "action" refers to and how it is used.

      The "action" of a gun, in the instant context of this thread, always refers to the trigger's task, or responsibility, as it relates to the firearm. With semi-auto pistols, the common actions in use are 1) Single Action (SA), 2) Double Action (DA), sometimes called Double Action/Single Action (DA/SA), and 3) Double Action Only (DAO).

      In a single action, the only task the trigger performs is to release the hammer sear or the striker. It does nothing else. Best example is the venerated 1911 pistol.

      With a double action, the trigger can perform two tasks. It can cock and release the hammer or just release the hammer. A good example is the model 92 Beretta. When the hammer is at rest, a long pull of the trigger fully cocks the hammer, then releases it to fire the pistol. After this first shot, all subsequent shots can be made in single action mode since the movement of the slide cocks the hammer and the only thing the trigger does is release the hammer.

      A double action only pistol always performs two tasks. I both cocks the striker, or hammer, AND releases it to fire the pistol.

      The Springfield XD is a single action pistol because the striker is at full cock when the slide is exercised. There is no partial cocking with this gun. Therefore, the only thing the trigger does is release the striker to fire it.

      With the Glock, when the slide is exercised, the striker is left in a half-cocked condition. When the user starts pulling the trigger to fire the pistol, the striker is moved rearward into a fully cocked condition and then released by the final pull of the trigger to fire the pistol. The Glock trigger performs two tasks and always two tasks in the firing cycle. It completes the cocking of the strike and it releases the striker to fire the pistol Therefore, it is a double action only pistol. Incidently, the BATFE defines the Glock as a DAO pistol for the reasons I have just given.

    15. #15
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      Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBoy View Post
      First off, you must understand what the term "action" refers to and how it is used.

      The "action" of a gun, in the instant context of this thread, always refers to the trigger's task, or responsibility, as it relates to the firearm. With semi-auto pistols, the common actions in use are 1) Single Action (SA), 2) Double Action (DA), sometimes called Double Action/Single Action (DA/SA), and 3) Double Action Only (DAO).

      In a single action, the only task the trigger performs is to release the hammer sear or the striker. It does nothing else. Best example is the venerated 1911 pistol.

      With a double action, the trigger can perform two tasks. It can cock and release the hammer or just release the hammer. A good example is the model 92 Beretta. When the hammer is at rest, a long pull of the trigger fully cocks the hammer, then releases it to fire the pistol. After this first shot, all subsequent shots can be made in single action mode since the movement of the slide cocks the hammer and the only thing the trigger does is release the hammer.

      A double action only pistol always performs two tasks. I both cocks the striker, or hammer, AND releases it to fire the pistol.

      The Springfield XD is a single action pistol because the striker is at full cock when the slide is exercised. There is no partial cocking with this gun. Therefore, the only thing the trigger does is release the striker to fire it.

      With the Glock, when the slide is exercised, the striker is left in a half-cocked condition. When the user starts pulling the trigger to fire the pistol, the striker is moved rearward into a fully cocked condition and then released by the final pull of the trigger to fire the pistol. The Glock trigger performs two tasks and always two tasks in the firing cycle. It completes the cocking of the strike and it releases the striker to fire the pistol Therefore, it is a double action only pistol. Incidently, the BATFE defines the Glock as a DAO pistol for the reasons I have just given.
      Welcome to post #3.

      Regarding the Glocks classification as DAO, just because the ATF says something doesn't make it true.

      IE. If your gun breaks, and goes full auto you're now in possession of a machine gun.


      A true DAO gun has the following traits.
      1: Is only cocked by trigger manipulation and the trigger pull is the same for every shot.
      2: In semi-auto guns, the hammer will go back to rest (hammer down behind the slide) after each shot. Remember, the trigger cocks and releases the hammer, not the slide in this case.
      3: As the trigger is the driving force to cock and release the hammer, second strike capability exists. The Glock has none of those.

      There are other types of what I call hybrid DAOs, just as the LDA, DAK and LEM, but that's topic for another thread.

    16. #16
      Senior Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by VAMarine View Post
      Welcome to post #3.

      Regarding the Glocks classification as DAO, just because the ATF says something doesn't make it true.

      IE. If your gun breaks, and goes full auto you're now in possession of a machine gun.


      A true DAO gun has the following traits.
      1: Is only cocked by trigger manipulation and the trigger pull is the same for every shot.
      2: In semi-auto guns, the hammer will go back to rest (hammer down behind the slide) after each shot. Remember, the trigger cocks and releases the hammer, not the slide in this case.
      3: As the trigger is the driving force to cock and release the hammer, second strike capability exists. The Glock has none of those.

      There are other types of what I call hybrid DAOs, just as the LDA, DAK and LEM, but that's topic for another thread.
      Thanks for the "#3 welcome". I tend to be a fairly heavy contributor to a couple of other websites (guns and cars) and just flat forget to visit this one more often. A shame because I am sure there is a lot of good info on this site as well.

      As for a couple of good examples of true DAO pistols, I submit the Kel-Tec P11 and the Kahr series such as the K9 Elites. Both true DAO designs with one using a hammer for ignition (the Kel-Tec) while the other makes us of a striker for ignition. The Kel-Tec operates essentially exactly like a DAO revolver with the hammer at full rest and the trigger charged with fully cocking the hammer, then releasing it to fire the pistol. I performs this task and only this task each and every time the pistol is to be fired.

      The Kahr design operates functionally the same on the surface as does the Glock. The action of the slide partially cocks the striker. The trigger then completes takes it from there by completing the cocking the striker, then releasing it for firing. Both the Kel-Tec and the Kahr are true DAO designs and say so in their literature.

      Therefore, I reaffirm my post as being accurate and stand by my statements both in it and here.

    17. #17
      Member jimmy's Avatar
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      Here is a flash animation of the Glock internals as it fires..move the mouse over each part name and the animation will highlight that part..It shows the partial cocking of the striker with each slide cycle..Very interesting..That is exactly what I understood from VA Marine's explanation.

      http://www.topglock.com/Content.aspx?cKey=Glock_Flash

    18. #18
      Senior Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by jimmy View Post
      Here is a flash animation of the Glock internals as it fires..move the mouse over each part name and the animation will highlight that part..It shows the partial cocking of the striker with each slide cycle..Very interesting..That is exactly what I understood from VA Marine's explanation.

      http://www.topglock.com/Content.aspx?cKey=Glock_Flash
      Yeah I mentioned that, too. It is the action of the slide on the Glock which partially cocks the striker. The trigger completes the cocking cycle then releases the striker to fire a round.

    19. #19
      Junior Member 123Slickster's Avatar
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      Springfield vs Glock

      I saw a video online of the XDM vs the Glock 17. Glock won. XDM jammed (if u can believe that).

    20. #20
      Senior Member dondavis3's Avatar
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      I own them both and shoot them both.

      Both are very fine guns and will serve you well.

      I personally like my XDm better of the two because of the way it feels in my hand.. it might feel different in yours.

      You can't go wrong with either gun.

      There are so many of both of these guns around and for rent - I suggest you shoot them both.

      After shooting you'll know which is right for you.


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