question on stippling...

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    1. #1
      Member rvl8's Avatar
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      question on stippling...

      if you go on youtube and type in "heat stippling" there is a video. If you fast forward to about 3:30 or so you will see what looks like a typical soldering iron with some type of tip that makes a waffle type design, I am wondering if anyone can figure out how to make this tool or can make me one, I'll pay you. I'm guessing its a filed screw head or knurled or something, thanks guys

    2. #2
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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      It may be a standard wood-burning-art shading tool. Look in an art-supply store first, or Google "wood burning art tools."

    3. #3
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      At about 3:52 in the vid, he references making the stippling head, so I'm guessing his is handmade.

      Steve's point is still valid, though; you might well find something that will work as well or better in the wood-burning or leather-stamping areas of a hobby shop.

    4. #4
      Member rvl8's Avatar
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      I'll check that out thanks!

    5. #5
      Junior Member Concealed45_1911's Avatar
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    6. #6
      Member rvl8's Avatar
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      thats a nice looking design. it has to be something metal i can heat up though

    7. #7
      Junior Member Concealed45_1911's Avatar
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      The stamps are chrome plated cast steel, if you have a Tandy leather or any leather supply around you can go look at the hundreds of different sizes/designs

    8. #8
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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      Leather stamps are based upon a shank that is about 1/4" in diameter (and more than 3" long). Getting one hot enough to impress gun-grip polymer will be difficult, not to mention the problem of holding on to it when it's hot. You might need to "bathe" the stamp part in the flame of a torch, every so often, being careful not to melt it.
      The reason I suggested wood-burning tools is because they attach to an insulated, heat-protected handle that keeps the tool hot using electrical energy from the nearest wall socket. Much more convenient!
      Nylon-strap-cutting tools are much like wood-burning ones, but with thicker, tougher points. I have modified such tools to do Nylon-cutting tasks other than those for which they were designed. It's easy, requiring merely the use of files or a grinding wheel. Modifying a Nylon-cutting point to make a multi-point texturing tool should be a pretty simple filing job.

    9. #9
      Member rvl8's Avatar
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      well, i called up a local hobby shop, guy said he had something he thinks would work. so i go down there, that guy went to lunch or something, the other guy had NO IDEA what he could have possibly been talking about...

      i tried everything in my garage i could think of, even some knurled part of a exacto knife, but the design wasnt "high enough" so it didnt work out that well. i am just practicing on my plastic gun case right now. want to get it perfect before moving onto the gun grip

    10. #10
      Junior Member Concealed45_1911's Avatar
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      My thought was to take the leather stamp cut it off to about an inch long then grind the diameter down so it will fit in the soldering iron as a new soldering tip. it will take a powerful soldering iron to keep it hot though, could use a propane torch to help get it hot.

    11. #11
      Member Glockamania®'s Avatar
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      Good luck with it! A stippled Glock grip feels great!

    12. #12
      Junior Member prcabr4christ's Avatar
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      if you go to a high end tool shop, you can find metal stamps for imprinting things into metal (hammer method of course), they're meant to last at least half of forever, the set i have is about 7/16" square stock hardened steel, with a grinder (using cutting blades as well could be another option) and a knurler, maybe some patience with a file and they could be a long lasting stippler

    13. #13
      Member rvl8's Avatar
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      ill send you some money to make me one. i have a real lack of serious hardware stores around here.

    14. #14
      Junior Member prcabr4christ's Avatar
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      I used to be a welder/ironworker, but to be honest, I'm not really good with small applications such as this, I used to build bridges and handrails like heck, but as far as grinding, I'm not great when it gets real small...I would suggest using a dremel to work on the stamp as well....if you have access to a torch, you could heat the stamp up until its almost melted (cherry red), and then pound it onto a course file, that should knurl it for pretty cheap, thats what I would think about doing

    15. #15
      Member Old Padawan's Avatar
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      Perhaps you could apply an epoxy in a stipple like pattern. That’s what is in my Glock
      "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it." -Mark Twain

    16. #16
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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      I want to add something to this thread that comes from my experience shooting the good old 1911...

      I have found that control of a semi-auto pistol has very little (read: "nothing") to do with the texture of the panels on the sides of the pistol's grip. Control comes from the hand's adhesion to the front- and back-strap areas only. The side panels could be glassy smooth, and it wouldn't matter a bit.
      This is not to say that a Glock's silly little finger grooves make any difference. They don't. The only thing that really makes a difference is texture, and (up to a point) the rougher the texture, the better.
      Indeed, the side panels might better be polished dead smooth in order to make easier the hand-shift required by those who use the thumb to press the pistol's magazine catch.
      Think about it. You may end up agreeing with me.

    17. #17
      Junior Member Concealed45_1911's Avatar
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      I agree Steve, My full size 1911 has smooth black pearl gips on it and its never slipped out of my hand. used to have the hogue rubber wrap arounds on it but can shoot better with smooth and checkered front strap.

    18. #18
      Senior Member Mike Barham's Avatar
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      I completely agree with Steve.
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      All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

    19. #19
      HGF Forum Moderator
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      I have to differ on the effectiveness of the finger-grooves. For a while, I owned a Gen 2 and a Gen 3 Glock 19 at the same time, and when shooting them in a so-called side-by-side test (actually, one after the other), the finger-groove model stayed put in my sweaty hand much better than the non-finger-groove gun. I had full control of both, but the non-grooved gun would eventually slip upward in my grip ever so slightly, especially during high-speed runs of more than 5 shots.

      If the grooves don't fit a person, then they probably are more of a hindrance than a help, but especially when it's hot, and the 'ol hands get slick, they definitely help me.

      Maybe some stippling on the front panels, on the groove ridges, would help even more.

    20. #20
      Junior Member prcabr4christ's Avatar
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      I would say if you felt you needed texture on any part, the area you would need it most would be on the front strap....the reason for this is simple, the back-strap is basically a fulcrum (that may be mis-spelled), you generally have a grip on the back-strap, and the front pivots....so from that I would concoct that if texture was applied to the front, even if only for sweaty situations could be worth it, but for glocks I've never run into a prob with it slipping anywhere....maybe they just fit me well

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