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Thread: Gun Jamming

  1. #1
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    Gun Jamming

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    I have been blessed not to have any of my handguns jam from shooting but what is the safest way to take care of a gun that jams if you are at the range?
    Just keep hitting the trigger or how would one unjam their handgun?

  2. #2
    Member GlockamaniaŽ's Avatar
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    Safely put the jammed gun down and call the range officer or someone proficient.

    It depends on what jam it is: stove pipes, failure to fire, etc.

    I usually lock the slide back, remove the magazine and analyze the situation.

  3. #3
    Member Spartan's Avatar
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    I agree it depends on the type of jam. If it's something simple like a stove-pipe or a failer to feed the next round, typically racking the slide manually will take care of the problem.

    If a round got jammed into the barrel somehow, take the mag out, and get a worker to come help. This happened to me once when I rented a P22. THe striker hit the round but it didn't fire and wouldn't eject.

    I heard somewhere - and I am not sure if it's true - that after the striker hits the primer in the bullet, even if it doesn't fire it's still 'live'. One should wait a good 10 seconds before it's safe to handle. Can't be too safe I guess.

    And, ALWAYS, keep the gun pointed down range. That's a given but is still worth mentioning.

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    Senior Member spacedoggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan View Post
    I heard somewhere - and I am not sure if it's true - that after the striker hits the primer in the bullet, even if it doesn't fire it's still 'live'. One should wait a good 10 seconds before it's safe to handle. Can't be too safe I guess.

    And, ALWAYS, keep the gun pointed down range. That's a given but is still worth mentioning.
    The NRA book tells you to hold down range for 30 seconds.

  5. #5
    Member Spartan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacedoggy View Post
    The NRA book tells you to hold down range for 30 seconds.
    Ok, good to know. Can't be too careful.

  6. #6
    Member GlockamaniaŽ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan View Post
    I heard somewhere - and I am not sure if it's true - that after the striker hits the primer in the bullet, even if it doesn't fire it's still 'live'.
    I'd wait...lock the slide back and allow the defective bullet fall to the floor and move on. Most likely it was a remanufactured or reloaded ammunition.

    Always be extra cautious when using reloads.

    I did a search: http://www.louisianasportsman.com/details.php?id=697 The one pictured is a scary type of jam: Double Feed!!!

  7. #7
    Senior Member spacedoggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkim1120 View Post
    I have been blessed not to have any of my handguns jam from shooting but what is the safest way to take care of a gun that jams if you are at the range?
    Just keep hitting the trigger or how would one unjam their handgun?
    I take a jar with me and hope that the jamming comes out in blueberry. If it jams enough I will be looking forward to a tasty breakfast. Dam I have been so good lately, I guess I better get back to my 12 step program.

  8. #8
    Member Revolver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlockamaniaŽ View Post
    I'd wait...lock the slide back and allow the defective bullet fall to the floor and move on. Most likely it was a remanufactured or reloaded ammunition.

    Always be extra cautious when using reloads.

    I did a search: http://www.louisianasportsman.com/details.php?id=697 The one pictured is a scary type of jam: Double Feed!!!
    I must be doing something wrong since none of my reloads have ever failed me. I cannot say the same for factory ammunition. That is why I won't use factory ammunition for defense, carry, or to harvest game.

    I doubt very much the bullet was defective. I suppose that could have caused the cartridge to hang up on the feed ramp but the defective bullet if so deformed should have been caught before it was loaded into a magazine. More likely the primer was at fault.

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