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  1. #21
    Senior Member desertman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    In this case, I do not completely agree with Pincus.

    First, as a self-defense pistol, the 1911 is at least adequate. Properly set up, it is just as good as any other self-defense gun. Some are better than that, although at that level it all depends upon the training and skill level of the user. I am confident that my two full-size 1911s are superior self-defense weapons.

    Second, talking only about the "shortie," I agree with Pincus that the Colt's 1911 platform is not well suited to downsizing. I own a shortie 1911 that was built by a talented master gunsmith long before there ever was an Officers' Model .45 ACP. It works quite well, but only if it is kept scrupulously clean.
    On the other hand, I also own a Star PD, essentially a shortie 1911 (with a few small design changes), and it always works flawlessly. However, its heat-treated parts are suspect because its manufacturer's techniques were sloppy and inconsistent. One day, the wrong part will break at the wrong time, and I'll be out of luck.
    Nether do I. I think his message was that if you don't spend $3000 or thereabouts for a custom gun all other 1911's are shit. I have three "shorty" 1911's. A Detonics Combat Master, Kimber RCP II and a Kimber Ultra Carry. I have yet to have any issues with any of them. The Kimber's both have ramped barrels the Detonics un-ramped. I also have a Colt Commander and a Kimber Super Carry Pro. Both have un-ramped barrels, I do have occasional FTF's with both of those pistols along with a stove pipe here and there mostly using hollow points. Personally I think that a ramped barrel is a better design as you do not have that "step" between the feed ramp and barrel. That might account for the Kimber's reliability? However that does not explain why I haven't had any issues with the Detonics with it's un-ramped barrel? The ramped barrel is primarily designed for alloy framed guns so as not to wear out the feed ramp on those softer aluminum frames. Why Kimber didn't do that on the Super Carry Pro is beyond me?

    Granted I'm not going off and blowing a couple of thousand rounds through them each time I take them out. Maybe then problems would show up as the guns got filthy? I really don't know. Usually it's a hundred rounds or so. I'll go home and clean the gun(s) having them ready for the next round. The "shorty's" have all worked fine under those conditions.

    No, I do not use my 1911's for EDC as there are other guns that in my opinion are better suited for that purpose. The main reason is having to dis-engage a safety during what could be a tense situation. It's just another thing you have to do. For EDC I prefer an HK, Glock or a Sig, it's gotta' be a 45. I just bought an FNX 45 15+1, can't wait to try it out. I like that it has a low bore axis, is fully ambidextrous, holds 15+1 rounds of .45 ACP and it's not much bigger than my Sig P227 SAS. Yet the Sig is 10+1. The Sig though, is still my favorite .45. I find that it's really hard to beat the quality of a Sig for a production gun.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craigh View Post
    ...I grew up in a somewhat rural environment where home invasions and car jacking didn't exist. I don't think dad ever locked the front door unless we went on vacation...
    We now have been living in an isolated, rural environment for the past 20 years. We are the only family, among all of our island friends, who locks our house whenever we leave it. But then, that's mostly because there are guns in it.



    Quote Originally Posted by Craigh View Post
    I used to ride my bike to a dove field down the highway with a 12 gauge shotgun strapped to the back and was never stopped by local law enforcement...
    Yeah. And in the 1950s, I used to ride the New York City subway system carrying a .22 rifle because I lived uptown and the only range in the city was downtown, across the street from City Hall. And nobody ever said a word.
    And when I came home from Mr. Abels's with my prize Kentucky Long Rifle, I carried it unwrapped, wide open, in the subway too. See item #2 at: The One That Got Away?and The One That Didn?t | Guntoters



    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    ...I think his message was that if you don't spend $3000 or thereabouts for a custom gun all other 1911's are shit...
    I partly agree. And Pincus isn't the only person who thinks this way.
    Here's the funny part: My custom-built 1911 shortie probably cost the 1970s equivalent of $3,000.00 today, but it is less reliable than the Star PD, which cost me about $250.00 in '70s dollars when it was new.
    (The 1911 shortie had been built — and paid-for — by someone else. I got it at a bargain price when its owner desperately needed cash.)

  3. #23
    Member Craigh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Mr. Abels's with my prize Kentucky Long Rifle, I carried it unwrapped, wide open, in the subway too. See item #2 at: The One That Got Away?and The One That Didn?t | Guntoters

    I partly agree. And Pincus isn't the only person who thinks this way.
    Here's the funny part: My custom-built 1911 shortie probably cost the 1970s equivalent of $3,000.00 today, but it is less reliable than the Star PD, which cost me about $250.00 in '70s dollars when it was new.
    (The 1911 shortie had been built — and paid-for — by someone else. I got it at a bargain price when its owner desperately needed cash.)
    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    Nether do I. I think his message was that if you don't spend $3000 or thereabouts for a custom gun all other 1911's are shit.
    I love those stories on Guntoters. I really do.

    Now, as far as Pincus's video is concerned, I watched it again and can nowhere see anything about needing to spend money on a custom 1911a. I think this was an indictment against the 1911a platform for defensive purposes regardless of how much you spend and particularly against small sub-compact versions, again, no matter what you paid; stock or custom. In fact, he said fewer than 10% of all 1911a handguns can make it through one day of his two day course without a malfunction and zero % of subcompact 1911s can make it through. Again, I see no mention of whether these are custom or not nor the price of them.

    I have to agree with the video. It just emphasized what I'd already decided and acted on when I switched my nightstand gun from a 1911a to a Walther PPQ. As much as I love this platform, when I decided to consider defensive arms a very few years ago, I made a sort of checklist of what such a firearm must be able to do. One of the most important check-boxes was reliability. I decided after break-in, I expect zero malfunctions. That's "none" for those of you from North Florida, not every once in awhile or on rare occasions. I know in competition we do a lot of Tap n Rack drills, but in a defensive situation, I don't want to have to rely on that, not when maybe my grandchildren are relying on me. Another check box is the handgun must not have a safety. I've got great muscle memory from years of training to sweep that safety on a 1911a, but every once in a blue moon, maybe every 2000 or so rounds, I fail to do so for some reason. Under a huge amount of stress, it might be much worse. I don't know because, knock on wood, I've not been there.

    I know the 1911a platform is an emotional issue for many, but if we're honest about it, we know it isn't 100% reliable and neither are we in using it. I know we can say the same about almost all platforms, but some are far more reliable and don't have a safety so we're far more reliable. I just want to stack the deck the best I can. I don't want to entertain that visual of me pulling ever tighter on that trigger and, in panic, nothing is going bang as that shotgun full of buckshot is swinging towards my chest. :-(

  4. #24
    Junior Member OuttaPhilly's Avatar
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    My wife carried a Glock G42 for a while, but basically wanted to feel safer. She now carries a .38 Special revolver, and since she is deadly accurate with it, six rounds are plenty. I personally find .380 hard to shoot, largely because I have big hands. I understand they are "bad breath" guns, and meant for super close range, but, in my humble opinion, the stopping power of the .38 special, plus the greater ease of use, makes it a better self defense pistol than a .380.

    I carry either .40 S&W or 9mm, but they are both bigger to carry than .380.

  5. #25
    Senior Member desertman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craigh View Post
    I love those stories on Guntoters. I really do.

    Now, as far as Pincus's video is concerned, I watched it again and can nowhere see anything about needing to spend money on a custom 1911a. (
    I watched four of Pincus's video's in succession. The second to last video was an infomercial for Wilson Combat 1911's. There's no doubt about that. Towards the end of the video it was stated that a standard Wilson runs about $3300. After criticizing the 1911 platform in the first 2 video's. The Wilson infomercial discussed the craftsmanship of a Wilson and their reliability. In the last video Pincus stated that there were only (3) 1911's that were worth buying, all of them custom guns. I don't know of any other way to interpret that?

    While I too enjoy watching those video's I don't place too much stock in them. Especially when there is an infomercial for a particular brand(s).

    Don't get me wrong, as I've previously stated: In my opinion there are better guns more suited for EDC than the 1911. I've also had issues with two of the five that I own. One Kimber and one Colt. So Pincus is not entirely wrong in his assessment of that platform. My two Kimber "shorty's" and one Detonics have had no issues so far.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    In my own experience with 1911s, in serious competition and "practical" shooting since 1978, I can confidently state the following:
    1. If fed with RN bullets running at least 850fps out the muzzle, any 1911 will be reliable if the magazines being used are fairly new. It's all about the magazine.
    2. If you want to shoot HP bullets with complete reliability, your 1911 should have been "tuned" by a master gunsmith, and your magazines should be fairly new.
    3. M1911 reliability rests more with the magazine's feed lips than with any other single factor. Master-gunsmith tuning won't help, if the feed lips are bad.

    I have always used G.I. magazines, some having been made for WW2. I bought them in wholesale quantity, back in the 1980s.
    I still have lots of them, new and unused, all still in their unopened, original packaging.
    Each brand-new magazine has had to prove itself in practice, through a couple of use-cycles, before I will rely upon it. From then on, I keep a very careful watch on its feed lips.
    One mis-feed, and the magazine is discarded (or sold, cheaply, to someone who will use it only for practice).

    Note, though, that I am still using three old G.I. magazines which have never failed me.
    Most recently (maybe about 2003), Jean learned to shoot the pistol using them.
    They were made for the Korean War, and I began using them in 1982.

    ...And so endeth my share of the hijacking of this thread.

  7. #27
    Member Craigh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post

    Note, though, that I am still using three old G.I. magazines which have never failed me.
    Most recently (maybe about 2003), Jean learned to shoot the pistol using them.
    They were made for the Korean War, and I began using them in 1982.

    ...And so endeth my share of the hijacking of this thread.
    Early on I switched to Wilson Combat 47D mostly. My last three were Wilson Combat Elites. I've replaced the springs once in a blue moon. I can't think of a magazine related issue I've had. If I have a failure, I put a little dot on that mag with nail polish and regulated it to the range. If after a good while, that mag doesn't fail, I assume it wasn't the mag and return it to general duty. Later, I'll scratch off the nail polish.

    A somewhat interesting side note was that at a Bullseye type informal gallery meet a few years ago, I forgot to bring my normal quantity of magazines. I stopped in a store where they only had ProMag. I knew their poor reputation but had little choice and purchased 3 of them. To this day, these three have not failed, though they don't leave the range ammo box.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Audioi View Post
    My wife is looking for something tiny to carry, she has a G43 and XDS3.3 but needs something smaller to fit her 105 lb frame. She picked up a Kimber Micro carry and liked it but I have read a few bad reviews, I am thinking a P238? What would you recommend?
    What I recommend is the Kahr P380 at less than 10 ounces!

    The KEY to the overly expensive Kahr is to remove two coils off the extractor spring...then the gun suddenly becomes a 100% feeder!

    The Kahr is .75" thick, 4.9" long, and 3.9" high, weighing in at under 10 ounces. It is a SMALL gun!

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