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  1. #1
    john doe. is offline Banned
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    Static Electrcity and pre-mature firing

    I was playing with my daughter at Mc Donalds the other day and kept getting shocked with static electrcity on the slide. This got me wondering. As anyone ever heard of a round going off because of static eletricity? I was carrying my P-3AT at the time.

  2. #2
    nukehayes's Avatar
    nukehayes is offline Member
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    I know that the Germans used an electrical firing mechanisms in some of their aircraft machine guns during WW2, however I seriously doubt that static electricity from the slide at Mcdonalds would make your gun go off. The amount of amps it would take would kill you before the gun went off.

  3. #3
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    Not going to happen.

  4. #4
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    MLB
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    Didn't the Mythbusters show do an episode where they tested the .22 in the fuse box thing?

  5. #5
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    Definitely not going to happen. The powder itself is nonconducting, so if anything the static electricity (electrons) would flow through the brass case - and only then if the brass case was grounded somehow. Even then, there won't be nearly enough energy (heat) to start the reaction. Carry on with confidence.

  6. #6
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    scooter is offline Supporting Member - Legally Armed Scooter Trash
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    I got an Idea........next lightning storm comes your way go outside and let us know how it turns out

  7. #7
    Baldy's Avatar
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    +1 With Scooter.

  8. #8
    john doe. is offline Banned
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    Thanks for your comments. I've been waiting for a good lighting storm to test Scotters theory but it's been pretty nice lately.

  9. #9
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    So that's why that happens.......

  10. #10
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    Static electricity and ...........

    Having done much work during my carreer around grain elevators, the subject of static electricity as an ignition source was very seriously studied. It was generally concluded that static electricity is a "cold" spark, and would not ignite grain dust.

    However, in the soybean processing industry, where very flammable hexane is used, it was found to be a source of igition on vapors.

    A friend of mine told me some years ago of a flintlock firing prematurely as a result of a static spark created by a nylon jacket setting off the powder in the pan.

    And electric primed ammunition used in aircraft use and electric primer, not set off by percussiion.

    Bob Wright

  11. #11
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    Lick a wall socket and for safety please wear a condom in case of pre-mature firing

  12. #12
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    A static electricity discharge....

    This story was told to me years ago by a friend of mine, Jeff Jolly, of Cadiz, Ohio:

    He was shooting a skeet, using a flintlock. The range protocol called for the shooter to stand in a "ready" station, marked off with a concrete parking lot bumper. Only there could he load his gun, which he had done. As the day was cool, he wore one of those Nylon coach's jackets.

    He had just loaded, and was standing with the muzzles down, pointing more-or-less toward the concrete barrier. He made a movement so that his arm brushed against the front of the jacket and "K-BOOM!" the gun fired one barrel. The shot charge splattered against the ground and barrier, to no harm. Near as they could determine, it was set off by the static spark.

    Skeet with a flintlock? They do it, though I have no idea why. Memphis gunsmith Ed Mason won an international title, years ago when in better health, in Switzerland in both flint and percussion skeet.

    Bob Wright

  13. #13
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    Rifles as lightning rods

    Since yesterday I remembered seeing a rifle when I was at Springfield Armory. During the Civil War, a soldier was on guard duty there. He was carrying one of those M1841 Rifles, at sling arms, when his rifle was struck by alightning bolt. The end of the barrel was split open and twisted, the wood forearm shattered. As I recall, the powder charge was still intact.

    The soldier was burned, but survived. Understand he went to church regularly from then on after that.

    Bob Wright

  14. #14
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    Hey all new here and eager to help. The idea of the spark setting off the powder is probably not possible. First of all, the spark would actually have to arc through the inside of the cartridge through the powder. This is very (read next to impossible) unlikely as the charge is tryinmg to find its way to the ground. even if the cartridge was the fastest path to ground, the current would flow through the brass and not the powder air mixture inside the shell. I am unsure of the temperature of the static spark, but I seriously doubt that it has enough energy to heat the powder to the flash point even if you could get it to arc through it.

    Tom

  15. #15
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    js
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacedoggy View Post
    Lick a wall socket and for safety please wear a condom in case of pre-mature firing
    "bing bang boom! hair out...hamburger time" - William Murderface

  16. #16
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    If you reload you need to think about static control. There is no difference between a spark generated in an auto spark plug and one generated by static charge except energy level. Static charges can contain less or greater energy levels than commonly generated in automobile systems. The term cold spark used in one of the posts is misleading to say the least. Powder stored in a manner that allows a static spark to occur within it can ignite. A cartridge with metalic case and bullet will not ignite from common static sparks.

    I base these statements on 40+ years experience within the Electronics industry including extensive environmental test experience within a surge/spark supressor manufacturing operation.

    Enjoy

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