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  1. #21
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    I had one during a competition. Most competitions have a "cold range" meaning there are no loaded handguns unless you are up to shoot and the RO (range officer) tells you to "Load and make ready." At this competition, the range was hot, so competitors could and did have loaded guns but, of course, no one could handle his/her gun unless they were up to shoot and the RO told them to load and make ready. At a cold range, when you are done shooting, there is a procedure you go thru to make sure the range is clear or "safe." When you stop shooting, the RO will say: "If you are finished, unloald and show clear." Once you have dropped the mag and racked back the slide and hold it back to show the RO the chamber is clear, the RO will then say: "If clear, hammer down and holslter" so the competitor dry fires the weapon (while pointed safely downrange, of course) and holsters the handgun. Only at that point will the RO say: " The range is clear" or, less correctly, "the range is safe." At the hot range, the RO will simply say: "If you are finished, holster" which also means you must put the gun on safety if it has one.

    WEll, I confused the two procedures. When I finished shooting the course of fire and the RO told me to holster, I dry fired the handgun before holstering. ONly, it wasn't a dry fire because there was a round in the chamber. I had the gun pointed safely downrange but I was very surprised and totally embarrassed. Hopefully, it won't happen again.

    WEll, to my embarrassment and chagrin, I mixed

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
    James Jarrett, who is quite a horseman as well as shooter/instructor, once told me, "You show me somebody who has never fallen off a horse, and I'll show you somebody who hasn't ridden much." Jarrett maintained that we are all going to have an AD someday; our mission is make sure that when our turn comes, it will be benign, that there will be only embarrassment, not death or injury.

    Of course, I didn't believe him. I had been handling guns -- a lot -- for over 20 years, firing over 10,000 rounds a year, sometimes much more.

    There are two kinds of shooters: Those who have never had an AD (or ND, if you prefer), and those who haven't had an AD yet.

    My AD was with a Ruger .22/45. I knew the magazine was out, because I saw it there on the table, picked it up and put it away. I knew the chamber was empty, because I pulled back the slide and looked. I did not know that there was another magazine in the gun, because I assumed that the one I picked up and put away was the one from the gun. When I pulled back the slide to inspect the chamber, I loaded one from the magazine.

    I lined up on a leaf on a bush outside the window, backed by a cinder block wall, because I knew that was a safe direction -- cinder block walls stop .22's. And it did, too. Windows, however, don't stop .22's.

    Yes, there was a hole through the leaf -- I'm not making that up for dramatic effect, I really did hit the leaf. (I was a fluke, though, after the bullet penetrated glass.)

    I called the glazier and had the window repaired before my wife got home. She never knew; still doesn't.

    Nowadays, all my dry-firing, and loading and unloading, is done with the gun pointed at a target that is hung in front of a couple of old Kevlar vest panels, against an exterior wall that is backed by a cinder block wall on the outside. I now believe with all my heart, with a religious conviction, that I WILL have another AD some day, but I am determined that it will be benign.

    Your turn: Have you had an AD -- yet?
    From what I have read and experienced, this is the right attitude. Even if you go thru life as a shooter and never experience an AD, you should prepare as if you will. I read that there is a hotel not far from a popular gun training range in the southwest that is host to a lot of people attending classes at the training grounds. This hotel has, based on experience, placed steel plates in each of the rooms for patrons to use as a target for dry firing practice. If someone does have an AD, the steel should prevent any serious injuries to the other guests.

  3. #23
    clic2323's Avatar
    clic2323 is offline Junior Member
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    last year i was skeet shooting with friends and in loading 6 rounds 5+1 in my moss 500 i chamberd the first round and began to load the rest when (bamm) luckly it was pointed downward but it scared the sh*% out of my friends
    the first and last time

  4. #24
    James NM's Avatar
    James NM is offline Senior Member
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    Anyone can have an AD - even the great Jeff Cooper. I just read in a recent gun rag about his. He was bragging about the sweet trigger on his new chrome Smith 29. He unloaded the cylinder & was dry firing to enjoy the trigger pull. On the second "squeeze" he got quite a surprise. One of the rounds had stuck in the cylinder when he "unloaded" it.

    I'll bet a 44 Mag going off indoors without hearing protection is unpleasant.
    At least no one was injured because the muzzle was pointed in a safe direction.

    It can happen to anyone.

  5. #25
    kraigster414's Avatar
    kraigster414 is offline Junior Member
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    Nothing like getting off to a good start (this is only my second post) but in my line of business, we call it a NEGLIGENT discharge. Accidental is when a meteorite decides out of 150 billion homes to land on YOUR roof. The overwelming majority of ND's are due to human error not to a mechanical failure. Flame me if you will but this is the way I was trained.

  6. #26
    Wandering Man's Avatar
    Wandering Man is offline GM HGF Gold Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kraigster414 View Post
    Nothing like getting off to a good start (this is only my second post) but in my line of business, we call it a NEGLIGENT discharge. Accidental is when a meteorite decides out of 150 billion homes to land on YOUR roof. The overwelming majority of ND's are due to human error not to a mechanical failure. Flame me if you will but this is the way I was trained.
    But you get more responses if you call them "accidental". No one likes to admit they were negligent.



    WM
    Never argue with drunks or crazy people.

  7. #27
    kraigster414's Avatar
    kraigster414 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wandering Man View Post
    But you get more responses if you call them "accidental". No one likes to admit they were negligent.



    WM
    I hear ya but when it comes to guns and the serious consequences of mishandling, you have to play "tough love" me think. In the military, government security, and LE world, we call it a "negligent" discharge, pure and simple. And in every case I have reviewed, the action was attributable to human error, e.g., not clearing a weapon properly or unfamiliarity with the workings of the weapon - all things that could have been prevented.

    While the term "accidental" may sound better, it's not a term my colleagues or I are allowed to use. After the dust settles and hopefully no one was killed or injured, there is a lot of "explainin'" to do on the part of the "discharger" - including serious disciplinary action (sometimes). Not pretty.
    Last edited by kraigster414; 01-13-2007 at 08:07 PM.

  8. #28
    reconNinja is offline Junior Member
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    My buddy and I were at a friend's house during a party one night many years ago, and the three of us came across a rusty old shotgun in a closet, and some shells. We took it out in the back and unbeknownst to me, my buddy had very very little knowledge on firearms; especially rusted out shotguns twice as old as we were. Well he loaded it up and pulled the trigger, nothing happened. He turned it to the side, to where the barrel was pointed to his immediate left, while I was behind him on his left. He then slid the pump forward and *BOOM* the gun fired and damn near jumped out of his hands. There were all sorts of people on the right side, he just got lucky.

    NEVER NEVER NEVER fuck with a gun that you don't know how to operate. All those warnings stamped into the slides of guns mean something.

    And I'm sure most if not all people on this board know enough about guns that it would likely never be a problem, but just because you know the safety, certainly doesn't mean others around you don't.

    Personally, I try not to even give myself a chance to AD/ND by carrying Condition 3(full mag, chamber empty) whenever I have the gun.

    edit- This probably wins the gold though, so don't feel too bad fellas
    Last edited by reconNinja; 01-13-2007 at 11:10 PM.

  9. #29
    milquetoast is offline Member
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    worthwhile accessory

    Kevlar pistol case for ALL administrative handling in quarters.

    http://www.safedirection.com/

    If you do have an accident (or a "negligent"), make sure it is only embarrassing, not fatal.

  10. #30
    TJCombo's Avatar
    TJCombo is offline Junior Member
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    I was 20yo, and was living in a duplex in a bad section of town. I had no money to buy a proper handgun, and really felt I needed one. My uncle gave me a Davis .380 semi auto. What a piece of junk. Anyway, I was on the phone one night, picked up the gun removed the magazine and began dry firing, heard a knock on the door, put magazine back in, put phone down, answer door, tell salesman I don't want any, return to phone call, forget I put magazine back in, resume "dry firing" BANG..or should I say POP....it was a Davis .380...anyway ND occured, no injuries, live and learn.

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