Will that be plastic or metal today - Page 3

    View Poll Results: Plastic or metal what do you perfer

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    • Plastic

      122 41.92%
    • Metal

      169 58.08%
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    1. #41
      Junior Member Reaper's Avatar
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      Metal all the way.

      Look at your Glocks or P99s. What's plastic there? Only the frame, and not even that at all. All the guide rails, reinforcements and that stuff is made of metal.

      Metal has it's big advantages, of being still strong with minimum thickness. If I were to make a damn good looking gun, even if it were a futuristic design, I would make it out of metal. Sure, I would cast many parts, cause that saves work, and can be as strong as machined parts. Hardening of the parts is an essential part in making a gun, and with plastic, you are quite fixed to the specific properties of the plastic you take. When you use metal instead, you can differentially harden parts, and get different properties in one piece of the same metal.

      With the technonlgy of today, you can create anything out of metal, it has it's special feel, that plastics will never have, and it will probably even last longer. I have seen 600+ year old swords, that look like they are new, and even have the same strength and durability they had when they were made. Now, someone show me a 600+ year old Glock frame with these attributes

      If it is for a rifle, then plastic can be applied everywhere they want to, except for the action itself (barrel, hammer / trigger group, bolt, whatever belongs to that).

      I would rather tend to metallic polymers for the future, as they are clearly coming more and more.

    2. #42
      MLB
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      Quote Originally Posted by Reaper View Post
      Metal all the way.
      ... Now, someone show me a 600+ year old Glock frame with these attributes
      ....
      Personally, I like metal better, but put your sword and that Glock frame in a damp place for 600 years and you'll likely only find the frame sitting on a dark orange dustpile.

      I have some of each. Different tools for different jobs.

    3. #43
      Junior Member Reaper's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by MLB View Post
      Personally, I like metal better, but put your sword and that Glock frame in a damp place for 600 years and you'll likely only find the frame sitting on a dark orange dustpile.
      Well, If I'd have to take one of my swords, I would accept gladly. We are not only talking about steel, there are other metals like Titanium, Aluminium, Chrome, Copper, and many many polymers that incoorporate some of these.

      I have one handmade sowrd made od a Titanium Alloy, which can cut steel, is flexible, well balanced and won't ever rust in any form. That could beat any plastic abailable.

    4. #44
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      All handguns balance trade-offs.

      Plastic guns are more comfortable to carry with less weight and easier to conceal. Adjustable grip sizing is a blessing for selecting department issue weapons for officers with different sized hands (P30 is probably the best for this). The downside is that lighter guns have snappier felt recoil where most rely on flexing of the poly frames to moderate recoil.

      Metal guns are easier to shoot accurately with their greater mass providing a softer push recoil and reduced flip for the same sized barrel. Contrary to an earlier post, high cap receivers are available in metal. Para Ordnance makes a number of these.

      Given my druthers, I prefer a 4" poly 9mm for CCW and a Government sized 1911 for open carry. Each has their place.

    5. #45
      Banned fivehourfrenzy's Avatar
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      I like the lightweight qualities of the polymer, but they tend to be more top-heavy than metal framed handguns of similar size/build. I love my 1911, and it's got an aluminum frame. I'd still rock a polymer handgun though, if I felt the need for another handgun that was polymer framed.

    6. #46
      Senior Member Bob Wright's Avatar
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      I have to go with steel.

      This last time I sent a plastic gun to Doug Turnbull for case hardening, it melted.

      Bob Wright

    7. #47
      Senior Member gmaske's Avatar
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      I like both. I really like the weight qualities of plastic and alloy pistols.

    8. #48
      Senior Member Mike Barham's Avatar
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      I guess if you care if your pistols are still around in 600 years, you should choose steel. Since I will not be around in even 60 years, I do not care. My guns are here to take care of me, not vice versa. All but one of my pistols are polymer framed, and I only shoot the steel gun maybe once a year.
      Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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    9. #49
      GTD
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      No preference, the sig 226 just felt so much better then the blocky glocks.

    10. #50
      Member Black Metal's Avatar
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      I voted for plastic because the only gun I use everyday is plastic. That being said I am sure I will always own both plastic and metal guns. I like most guns doesn't matter to me what they are made of as long as its been tested and proven.

    11. #51
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      Quote Originally Posted by MLB View Post
      Emphasis above is mine.

      On the expense point, I'd agree that it is likely less expensive to produce, but I'm surprised that I don't find a corresponding lower sale price. $600 for a plastic framed gun gets to me I guess
      Well, what about those $3k+ 1911s.

      FWIW: it's POLYMER not Plastic...Sure it's a type of plastic but it is not the same plastic used in your drinking cups and soda bottles, hence it's called polymer. The molecular structure of a Polymer frame is vastly different than consumer grade plastics.

    12. #52
      Senior Member hideit's Avatar
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      i am going thru this choice right now for a 45acp
      since glocks have proved the reliability of plastic and have been copied by XD and the M&P just to mention two and
      since they are not as expensive..
      with the economy going the way it is i expect the sales of handguns will continue to grow in the plastic markets
      i have a glock 26 and am leaning towards the glock 36 - i don't need a high capacity handgun

    13. #53
      Senior Member BeefyBeefo's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by hideit View Post
      i am going thru this choice right now for a 45acp
      since glocks have proved the reliability of plastic and have been copied by XD and the M&P just to mention two and
      since they are not as expensive..
      with the economy going the way it is i expect the sales of handguns will continue to grow in the plastic markets
      i have a glock 26 and am leaning towards the glock 36 - i don't need a high capacity handgun
      I must say, even though I do love my XD's, if I wanted a .45 for CC (when I can carry), I would probably go with that G36. You can't go wrong with any Glock IMO, and I like the slim design

      -Jeff-

    14. #54
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      If I wanted a compact .45, I'd use a HK45c. That's just me. I owned a Glock but found I liked the Hk better, I do like the XD though.

    15. #55
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      Quote Originally Posted by Dredd View Post
      ...

      FWIW: it's POLYMER not Plastic...Sure it's a type of plastic but it is not the same plastic used in your drinking cups and soda bottles, hence it's called polymer. The molecular structure of a Polymer frame is vastly different than consumer grade plastics.
      Thanks for the lesson. I suppose I should stop calling my P99 "Tactical Tupperware" then.

      If we're going to be specific though, all plastics are polymers. "Polymer Framed" does sound much better in the advertisement though...

      I wonder if my Walther is recyclable

    16. #56
      Senior Member tekhead1219's Avatar
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      Talking

      I prefer the metal because of the weight and absorbing the recoil. I prefer plastic for carry because of the weight.

    17. #57
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      I got plastic and I got metal..Both of what I have are good examples of their genre of weapons. If I had to take one over the other then I have to go with metal if for no other reason the simple fact is metal has proven itself much longer than any plastic can. you can spew tests till hell froze over but no one can show a test going near the time span of many metals used in gun making.

      Sure..You can deep fry a Glock (though I must ask why) but I can pick up a 1911 colt made in 1911 and use it and see if function perfectly. All the tests on "tupperware" can't show but a small fraction of that time. I have watched plastic get better over time but I'd like to see it last as long as some of the old Kentucky Rifles I've had the pleasure of getting to fire. I guess my grandchildren are going to be in a better position to answer this question correctly..lol

      For me I really like the feel of an all metal gun for most all my gun needs, I don't see a weight issue in carrying a full size 1911 or 686 Smith. Like I said I have some plastic guns but they are mostly range toys and are not carried all that often. Some good shooters tho.
      Last edited by DevilsJohnson; 06-02-2008 at 09:44 PM.

    18. #58
      Junior Member nrd515525's Avatar
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      I prefer metal, steel if possible. I don't have any problems carrying the biggest of hanguns, short of a Desert Eagle, or one of the old SA monster revolvers. I LIKE heavy guns, and prefer them over lightweight ones, every time. I haven't owned a plastic, er um, "polymer" gun yet, I recently passed up a nearly new Taurus 9mm 24/7 Pro that a friend wanted to sell me for a great price. I passed it up mostly for money issues, but the plastic kind of turns me off, to be honest about it. Glocks and the similar guns I really have no interest in at all.

    19. #59
      Member Freedom1911's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by spacedoggy View Post
      Do you think they will ever make a plastic Revolvers?? Not that I would run out and buy and could it work just making the frame plastic???
      Well there was this one

      Type: Double Action
      Caliber: .357 Magnum
      Weight unloaded: 0.9 kg
      Length: 232mm (4" barrel)
      Barrel length: 102mm (4") or 152mm (6")
      Capacity: 6 rounds

      The MP-412 revolver has been designed at IZHMECH (State-owned Russian Izhevsk Mechanical Plant, a large factory known as a prime maker of Makarov PM pistols among other things). This revolver was intended for export, as a handgun ownership is generally prohibited for ordinary citizens in Russia. First prototypes of REX (Revolver for EXport) revolver were displayed at IWA-2000 arms exhibition in Nurenberg (Germany). It is not exactly known what killed this rather interesting project, but most possibly it was a lack of market, as the biggest export market, the USA, has been closed for Russian handguns since mid-1990s, because of Clinton / Yeltsyn mutual agreement.

      The MP-412 is a double action revolver with break-open frame and simultaneous extraction. The bottom frame is of composite type - it consists of a steel basic frame and a polymer envelope, which forms the grip and trigger guard. Polymer grip / trigger guard unit can be removed from steel frame if necessary. Trigger is of conventional type, double / single action, with exposed hammer. Firing pin is mounted in the frame. Barrel / cylinder group latch is located at the top rear of the frame, and is operated by two buttons that must be pushed inwards to unlock the frame. Cylinder holds 6 rounds and has an automatic ejector that throws the cases out of cylinder once barrel is fully tipped down. If necessary, automatic ejection feature can be manually switched off.


      MP-412 Rex revolver, with barrel tipped down for reloading

    20. #60
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      ...and the LCR...

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