Springfield XDS Striker Cleaning.

    Results 1 to 9 of 9
    1. #1
      Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2016
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      138

      Springfield XDS Striker Cleaning.

      OK I posted this in the Springfield forum and it is not getting any traction. Since most Semi-Auto's have similar Striker Mechanism thought I would repost here.

      OK I have a new XDS 3.3 9mm. Really like the gun so far. Initially I had some problems with spent shells failing to eject. Not jams, just have to rack the slide to clear the shell. At the advice of Springfield I applied a little extra oil to the barrel and rails, then ran 500 rounds to break the gun in. It worked as far as I can tell. It never failed to eject with extra oil.

      So no wit is time to clean it up, and in Springfield's owner manual it specifically states not to oil the striker chamber. I sort of understand that as oil attracts dirt and slows the striker action down. As a result of the extra oil I added, oil has migrated inside the striker cylinder. I know how to remove the striker by taking off the back plate off that secures the striker in the chamber. So I can clean with a degreaser solvent. Having said that my mind wonders how can one stop corrosion, rust, and excessive ware if you are not suppose to use oil or grease? It would leave bare steel.

      Is there something else one can use?

      All comments welcome and thank you in advance.

    2. #2
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2008
      Location
      Northwest Washington State
      Posts
      7,468
      How 'bout: "You can oil it, but don't use very much."
      Put just a drop of oil into the striker's channel, and it'll spread itself thinly all over the area.
      That will lubricate and protect the striker and its chamber without attracting a lot of gunk.

      Once in a while, clean it with degreaser, and then put another drop of oil in.

    3. #3
      Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2016
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      138
      Thinks Steve I was thinking of doing something similar. First use a De-Greaser/Cleraner Solvent like spray Brake Cleaner, followed by a good blast of Canned Air like you would use on keyboards to get the crud out. However after that I was thinking of maybe using one of the solvents that has a preservative or light lubricant, and blow it out with canned air again leaving a very light coat just to stop corrosion and rust. Springfield No Oil just has me weary of doing anything other than a spray De-Greaser/Cleaner leaving bare clean metal.

    4. #4
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2008
      Location
      Northwest Washington State
      Posts
      7,468
      Whatever you decide to do, don't over-think it, and don't obsess over it.

      No matter what you do, you're not going to hurt anything. Modern guns are pretty resilient.

    5. #5
      Member
      Join Date
      Aug 2015
      Posts
      296
      Good question - and one I've thought about. I also don't like to leave any metal parts totally dry. What I do when I occasionally strip the slide on my Glock:
      Spray polymer-safe degreaser (there is a plastic channel liner in the Glock's channel)
      Clean the firing pin & extractor channel with a pipe cleaner or Q Tip that has a bit of Break Free on it. Use a dry pipe cleaner to remove excess.
      Wipe the FP spring & FP with a cloth or paper towel that has a bit of Break Free on it

    6. #6
      Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2016
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      138
      Quote Originally Posted by win231 View Post
      Wipe the FP spring & FP with a cloth or paper towel that has a bit of Break Free on it
      Is that the stuff with Teflon in it?

    7. #7
      Member
      Join Date
      Aug 2015
      Posts
      296
      Quote Originally Posted by dereckbc View Post
      Is that the stuff with Teflon in it?
      I don't know if Break Free has Teflon in it. It's a good rust preventative & decent lube for low-friction areas.

    8. #8
      Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2016
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      138
      Quote Originally Posted by win231 View Post
      I don't know if Break Free has Teflon in it. It's a good rust preventative & decent lube for low-friction areas.
      Was at the store today and looked. I think this is the stuff CLP Break Free? It contains PTFE = Teflon. I picked up a can to try. Only issue I can think of with PTFE is it is a plastic and does burn at 500 degrees and can give off very toxic fumes. Don't se that as a problem unless you are full auto with a 500 round belt. Anyway thought you might like to know it does have Teflon. It is a good lubricant. I use to dabble as a Lock Smith some time ago and still use a product called Tri-Flow with Teflon. Fantastic on locks, better than graphite and stay put. Motorcycle and bicycle guys really like it in chains and external moving parts. Really quiets a chain drive down.

    9. #9
      Member
      Join Date
      Aug 2015
      Posts
      296
      Quote Originally Posted by dereckbc View Post
      Was at the store today and looked. I think this is the stuff CLP Break Free? It contains PTFE = Teflon. I picked up a can to try. Only issue I can think of with PTFE is it is a plastic and does burn at 500 degrees and can give off very toxic fumes. Don't se that as a problem unless you are full auto with a 500 round belt. Anyway thought you might like to know it does have Teflon. It is a good lubricant. I use to dabble as a Lock Smith some time ago and still use a product called Tri-Flow with Teflon. Fantastic on locks, better than graphite and stay put. Motorcycle and bicycle guys really like it in chains and external moving parts. Really quiets a chain drive down.
      Thanks for the info. I didn't know that PTFE was Teflon. I recall reading that the military uses Break Free extensively because it has a lower freezing point than most lubes & it's a good rust preventor. But for high-friction areas like slide rails, locking blocks, outside of barrel on autos, I prefer a thicker lube like Wilson Ultima Lube.

    Sponsored Links

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •