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  1. #1
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    Gun Oil

    No I am not gay.

    OK I am new to Semi-Automatic pistols, not new to guns. Have been a hunter for over 40 years, but I only have riffles, shotgun, and 357 mag pistol. They get used once a year. Well the 357 i sin my night stand.

    So I go to the Shooting Range for the second time with my new Springfield XDS 9mm to see if I got my problem fixed of not ejecting rounds. First time out right out of the box it failed to eject 7 times out of 150 rounds. Called Springfield and they said that was normal and to clean and lube gun, and run a couple of hundred rounds through the gun.

    So I get to the range. It was a slow day. Only people there is myself, Owner I know quite well, and his Gun Smith/Trainer. So they follow me out to the range. Load a magazine, and 3rd round failed to eject. The Gunsmith said let me see that thing. He field stripped it, and immediately said it was dry. Told him I just oiled it per Springfield Instructions of one drop on the barrel and each rail, then wipe off excess. He laughed and said wait a minute. Got a bottle of oil and slicked it up. Next 200 rounds no problems.

    When done the Gun Smith asked me what kind of oil I used. I told him some old Rem Oil from my cleaning kit. He laughed and said quit buying Gun Oil and make your own. He said Rem Oil is too light and evaporates. So he gave me two recipes. One for a cleaner I think most of you know called Ed's Red. For the oil he used and said competition shooters use is:

    2 parts 0-40W Mobile One Synthetic Motor Oil, and 1 part Slick 50. A quart of Mobile One is $8, and a pint of Slick 50 is $13 locally. More than enough to last me a lifetime.

    Sure seemed to work. Anyone else do this? Comments welcomed.

  2. #2
    Junior Member maddog's Avatar
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    heard about this and did some research,,,no more reg. expensive gun oil for me,,,hi quality auto 5w-30 or synthetic,,,,,cleans,,takes the heat and protects,,,,added the cost savings,,,5-9 $ a quart.....

  3. #3
    Junior Member Tangof's Avatar
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    A .22 Pistols.jpgNews to me. I've used Rem Oil for years on all my guns. Any malfunctions were the fault of the ammunition used. When I'm saying malfunctions I'm speaking of .22 Rimfire. I don't remember the last malfunction with centerfire, either pistol or rifle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tangof View Post
    A .22 Pistols.jpgNews to me. I've used Rem Oil for years on all my guns.
    News to me too. However Paul and his Gun Smith are not Spring Chickens. Both are ex military infantry NCO's trainers. Rick the Gun Smith has been working with guns all his life professionally and a competitive shooter. Both were of strong opinion Rem Oil is just not worth it, and home made lubes are far superior. If you do some searching like Police Forums, and Military echo the exact same opinions. You can make great Gun Oil for a fraction of the price you can buy it for. They even went on to say most of the Gun Oils on the market are just blends you can make at home at 1/10 the cost. Even the NRA says the same thing and has its own Recipe: of Mobile One, STP, ATF, and Hoppers #9 Solvent.

    You can choose, believe, use anything you want. I do not care. But when I hear Law Enforcement, Military, NRA, and other professionals say you can make better lubricants and cleaners at home for a fraction of the cost. I take notice and listen. Rick even confirmed my old cleaner formula on Black Powder and Shot Guns I use Dawn Dish Washing detergent and Hot Water. For Carbon and crud use Spray Brake Cleaner ans Sthil Chain Saw Decarbonizer. Only commercial product Rick suggested was KG12 for Copper Fouling. Otherwise no reason to use commercial gun solvents.

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    I live in the Mojave desert (4.5" precipitation a year) and found that Rem Oil works very well in my environment. I shoot outdoors and the wind is usually kicking up dust and grit while I reload magazines with the slide locked open. The Rem Oil evaporates but leaves a light coating of teflon behind. I've never had a ftf or fte using Rem Oil on any of my semi-autos. If you need to "slick up" your gun with oil for it to function properly, maybe it's a problem with the gun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joepeat View Post
    If you need to "slick up" your gun with oil for it to function properly, maybe it's a problem with the gun.
    Perhaps but everything I have learned is this is a known problem with new Springfield XDS models. The tolerances are so tight they need 500 rounds to get them broke in. The range owner is a dealer of Springfield and Glock and explained it is not a real problem to worry about, the gun just needs broken in. When the Gun Smith looked at my gun immediately said it was too dry. Just a few drops and it worked perfectly. These guys are friends with many years of experience and told me the trade secrets. I trust them. What they told me is backed up by other professionals saying the same thing. I am an engineer, I maybe old at 57 years young, but my mind is open, and this ole dog can still learn new tricks. You can spend $8 for 4 ounces, or I can spend $8 for a quart that works better and likely the same stuff you are spending 8 times more for.

    Take what you like, leave the rest.
    boatdoc173 likes this.

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    Member Spike12's Avatar
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    While I haven't heard that the XDS has that problem, wearing in of pistols and their slides by shooting them a few hundred rounds is certainly nothing new. I commonly advise that to any new pistol owner esp if they're planning on using the gun for defensive purposes where reliability is top priority. They will also develope their ability to eat additional types of ammo.

    The oil issue arguement has been going on for years and probably will go on long after we're all dead.

    IMHO: The makers of gun oil understand the requirements of gun much better than the car lubricant engineers. So I'm a fan of using gun oil on guns and car oil on cars. That said, I think all of that stuff is WAY over spec for what the average gun owner does with his/her pistol. Gun oil merchants over hype the need to use THEIR oil when in fact just about any will do.

    So in the case of the simple gun owner, proper lubrication is more important that which lubricant. I've seen threads where some guy took several oils (including Mobil 1, gun oil, WD-40,etc) and put them on common dinner plates. Then put them in the sun. Watched them for evaporation, stickyness, hardening, etc. The winner? 3-in-1. In fact, 3-in-1 used to say it was good for guns right on the can.

    I've never heard of a gun used by a typical owner on these kind of forums, say his fun failed because of the oil he used, like the slide welded to the frame at the range. Think about that. Our guns are NOT subjected to the stress, heat and pounding of wheel bearing on our car, or the rod bearings in the engine. It just isn't that complicated. How many times does the slide typically cycle before we clean the gun? Maybe 300 at the most? My God! These guns are tested over 10000's of rounds before they're put into production! They're just not that fragile!

    A very experienced gun smith on another gun forum told me that he'd seen more wear on guns from being constantly take apart for cleaning than from bad oil. I've had more guns fail to operate because of excessive lubrication or wrong lubrication than wrong oil.

    So what do I use? Froglube where I can but for the most part I'm still using the same bottle of Hoppe's gun oil I've had for years but I have no problem using the can of 3-in-1 that my dad left me.

    Like you manual said, a few drops on the rails, a little bit on the barrel for the bushing and you're done. The only thing I'd add is to: 1) Use compressed air to blow out the trigger group, 2)clean your mags with any new gun and leave them totally dry (you might be shocked at the gunk you'll find in there).

    I've not had good luck with Rem Oil out of the different oils I've used. It just seem to disappear.

    So don't get all worked up about the oil, it's important, yes. But not life or death to your gun. Just RTFM. Over lube is worse.

  8. #8
    Junior Member maddog's Avatar
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    Ive heard 3 in one used for years with great effect

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    Member shift1's Avatar
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    I have 2 friends telling me all they use is WD-40? I said you guys are crazy!!!

  10. #10
    Member hillman's Avatar
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    In my anecdotal experience, WD-40 has a poor rep as a lubricant. I have only used it as a penetrant and for light duty rust protection, is why it's 'anecdotal'.

  11. #11
    Member Spike12's Avatar
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    WD-40 is about as useful as a screen door on a submarine. It's just fish oil and water. The WD stands for Water Displacement or so I'm told.

    THe best use I've found for it is removing sticky stuff left behind from bumber stickers and it's not too good at that. The one can I have has almost rusted through I've had it so long.

  12. #12
    Member shift1's Avatar
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    I totally agree on the submarine theory! I told these guys it's a bad choice and it works great for removing tree sap on your car!

  13. #13
    Member HGF Gold Member

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    Ok Derek has peaked my interest.
    I have tried many lubes. Currently I usually combine 2 at a time on a q tip( super-lube liquid multi, sip 2000, fp-10 , mil comm mc 2300 or m-pro-7.) was going to try eezox until I read about the chemicals they use...NO THANKS. IMHO The best is slip 2000 and it costs the most.I have no issues with the lubes I am using but want to try the home mix out

    just ordered mobil1 synthetic 0-40w, and some prolong (as slick 50 has some issues and is not availalbe on that site) and a couple plastic mixing bottles. Hope it works. If it is like or better than slip 2000 I will be thrilled. if not, the testing will continue until I find what is best for me

    will f/u with a post in a few weeks

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    my POV--humble opinion--submitted for consideration--you have entered the twilight zone of lube threads.......

    mixed mobil 1 0-40w/slick 50 as the OP instructed and used it for a while. I think slip 200 is better. my slides feel better with that lube. That said this mixture seems ok. a bit thin. I put it up there with fp 10, mc 2300(mil comm), super lube for slide feel when racking.Now I wonder if a 10w-30 would be better. I have some merccruiser inboard motor oil(synthetic of course). maybe next batch I will try that weight with the slick 50.Going to try this oil mix for a while before trying ANYTHING else

    I will begin mixing 1-2 drops + 1-2 drops of slip 200 OR Lucas extreme( a new addition since Sig likes it so much and it seems to work well so far) to a q tip and lube my guns per

    update 2-20-16 all is well . the lube mix is thin but works well. Interesting discovery on my part. I noticed the motor oil mix + 1-2 drops of lucas oil(either extreme or plain) seems to remain on the slide and in the grooves for the slide much longer than the traditional(and more expensive) gun oils I have named and used for years.--nice find thanks to the OP for this info(oil mix recipe)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spike12 View Post
    WD-40 is about as useful as a screen door on a submarine. It's just fish oil and water. The WD stands for Water Displacement or so I'm told.

    THe best use I've found for it is removing sticky stuff left behind from bumber stickers and it's not too good at that. The one can I have has almost rusted through I've had it so long.
    WD40 has fish oil in it? So....according to some doctors, it can lower cholesterol.
    boatdoc173 likes this.

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    I live by Wolf oil.

    Home Page

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    Member Spike12's Avatar
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    I always get a smile when I hear about some guy who is going to try to out wit entire engineering staffs or industries by using a product designed for use in one market in an other or who has some dark art combo of stuff that will prove better than anything the industry can come with. I really wish there was a lab where the results could be accurately tested.

    America - CAN DO!

    God Love us!

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    Member Wyoming_1977's Avatar
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    Bacon grease.

    Works good. You get the benefit of having to fry up and eat bacon before servicing your weapon, and that ain't a bad thing.

    Yes, I am totally kidding.

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    Never heard of that home brew. There are many out there that guys swear by. Personally, I prefer Ballistol, but Mrs objects to it's lingering aroma. So, I'm back to RemOil.

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    [QUOTE=Spike12;368309]
    A very experienced gun smith on another gun forum told me that he'd seen more wear on guns from being constantly take apart for cleaning than from bad oil. I've had more guns fail to operate because of excessive lubrication or wrong lubrication than wrong oil.

    The gunsmith was probably referring to detail stripping causing wear, rather than field stripping. I'd agree with him.

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