Some handgun advise please.

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    Thread: Some handgun advise please.

    1. #1
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      Some handgun advise please.

      I am purchasing a handgun some.
      This will be my first handgun, but I have shot my brothers Browning Hi-power a few times.
      I've made my decision and will be getting the Walther PPQ in 9mm.

      My question is 4" or 5" barrel ?
      I know that the 5" makes the sights further apart making better accuracy, but is it needed ?

      I have people saying that you only need the 4" and other people saying that I gotta get the 5"

      Will the longer / heavier slide help with recoil ?

      This will only be used for shooting at the range and home defense.
      It will not be a concealed carry weapon.

      So please chime in tell me why I should get a 4c barrel or a 5" barrel.

      Thanks.

    2. #2
      Senior Member TAPnRACK's Avatar
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      If it's for range and home defense... I say go with the 5" barrel version.
      denner likes this.

    3. #3
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      I own both and let me dispel a myth. The guns in their current state are more accurate than us. Even a cheap ass Hi-point is more accurate than us.

      The test target for my 4" has a tighter pattern than the 5", but I attribute that to the shooter.

      The 5" is absolutely fine for home defense and range. That is what my 5" is used for.

      The slide on the 5" PPQ has cut outs in the fore of the slide to reduce the weight, balance the gun and perhaps to give the barrel some air, but don't let anyone tell you it's a compensator. It's not.

      As far as recoil, I don't notice a big difference between the two. I took the 4" to the range today, fired almost 200 rounds through it to drill my double tap. It was fine. I'll do the same for my 5" in another week or so. But I find the recoil not dissimilar.

      Practice with FMJ/Ball ammo, run some good hollow points through it for testing. I use Hornady Critical Defense/Duty.

      I've fired > 1200 rounds of Blazer Brass, Remington UMC and Fiocchi through my 5" PPQ without any problems whatsoever.

      But AVOID Winchester White Box. Today, I had three jams because the round didn't seat. The third had me looking for help.

      Really, the only consideration for the 4" is it's more concealable. Otherwise, the 5" is categorized by Walther as: home defense, competition (glorified target shooting), which I would agree with, but the barrel is not ported, reducing its competition factor.

      If your only concern is home defense and target shooting, the 5" is absolutely fine, unless you can get a 4" at a better price. Whichever you can get at a better price, that's what it ultimately comes down to.

      Get yourself a Bore Snake, a clean toothbrush, some gun cleaner and gun oil. You can rip up an old tee shirt or tidy whities for rags. That will be your base cleaning kit. You do not need to completely strip it down after every range trip. You just brush the ramp, run a bore snake through and you're done. You'd strip it down and clean the trigger mechanism after about 1000 rounds. For cleaning the trigger mechanism, if you're not comfortable taking the trigger apart, then just get some contact cleaner in an aerosol can.

      Lastly, the PPQ is a very fine gun. It's well engineered. It's every bit as good as a glock or Sig and perhaps even better because of the trigger and ergos. You're making an excellent choice.
      denner likes this.

    4. #4
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      The 5" is probably the better choice but really, the difference is slight for your use. Like others have said, the biggest area where the 1" would make a difference is in concealed carry because smaller is better.

      For range and home defense use you want a full size gun that: 1) is comfortable to shoot for those long range sessions, 2) is easy to handle in those critical home defense situations. A conceal carry gun is just the opposite of those: small, reliable and who cares how comfortable it is.

      Be sure to clean it thoroughly when you get it and the mags too BEFORE your first range trip. Do not over lube. Keep the mags totally dry, no lube. Lube the gun lightly - this isn't the wheel bearings on your car. Read the manual and use a good gun oil (NOT car oil). Personally I don't think there's spit difference between gun oils, just hype. Guns for personal use aren't as hard on their oil as everyone would want you to think. Over lubing generally causes additional wear and malfunctions. If you get a cleaning kit it will most likely come with an oil. That will be fine, really. I've never read of a story where the gun failed because of the oil - never.

      Start shooting just FMJ (aka; BALL) ammo to get your gun broken in. This isn't for the barrel. It's for the slide, frame, trigger parts, feed ramp, etc.. Since this is to be used for self defense you want to be SURE it's broken in and reliable. After AT LEAST 100rds AFTER the LAST problem then start shooting your selected defense round. Choose your defense ammo on RELIABILITY and nothing else. Everybody's bullet looks great on paper but if it doesn't WORK in your gun, it's useless. I avoid cheap, Russian or Eastern Europe ammo like a broken arm.

      Right now i use Hornady Critical Defense. I do not use Critical Duty because it's made for police and FBI units and their extreme penitration needs (car doors and glass) so for home use I think it's too much. But again, select one and make SURE it works in your gun. However, bullet placement on a bad guy trumps any magic bullet or caliber.

      THEN PRACTICE. Then practice some more.

      You should have 2 mags at a minimum. Take good care of them as their condition have A LOT to do with your gun's reliable function (like most of it).

    5. #5
      Senior Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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      Welcome aboard, we're pleased to have you here.

      Question, please. How difficult is it to purchase a handgun in New Jersey? What steps must you take before you can assume possession of the gun?

    6. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBoy View Post

      Question, please. How difficult is it to purchase a handgun in New Jersey? What steps must you take before you can assume possession of the gun ?
      1st you have to obtain a New Jersey firearms identification card.
      This an issued card that allows you to purchase long guns.
      At the time you purchase a long gun, the seller performs a NICS instant background check.

      So, onto handguns.
      You already have to possess a New Jersey firearms identification card.
      Now you need to apply for a New Jersey handgun permit.
      This permit consists of another background check and a mental health investigation check.
      I believe you are able to get 3 handgun permits per application.
      The handgun permit ( when issued ) is good for 90 day before it expires.

    7. #7
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      Quote Originally Posted by 2robinhood View Post
      1st you have to obtain a New Jersey firearms identification card.
      This an issued card that allows you to purchase long guns.
      At the time you purchase a long gun, the seller performs a NICS instant background check.

      So, onto handguns.
      You already have to possess a New Jersey firearms identification card.
      If you can swing the cost, get yourself a Mossberg 500 (full stock, not pistol grip) and a Walther PPQ.

    8. #8
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      Quote Originally Posted by RobertS View Post
      If you can swing the cost, get yourself a Mossberg 500 (full stock, not pistol grip) and a Walther PPQ.
      I already have plenty of long guns.

      One Mossberg 935
      One Remington 870 12 gauge
      Two Remington 870 20 gauge
      Two Ruger 10/22
      One Marlin model 40 .22LR
      One Remington 1100 12 gauge
      One Remington 7600 pump 30-06

      I'm actually buying a PPQ in 9mm and a PPQ in .22LR for the wife.
      She can plink with the .22, but if she needs the 9mm for defense, it will feel exactly the same to her.

    9. #9
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      Quote Originally Posted by 2robinhood View Post
      I already have plenty of long guns.

      One Mossberg 935
      One Remington 870 12 gauge
      Two Remington 870 20 gauge
      Two Ruger 10/22
      One Marlin model 40 .22LR
      One Remington 1100 12 gauge
      One Remington 7600 pump 30-06

      I'm actually buying a PPQ in 9mm and a PPQ in .22LR for the wife.
      She can plink with the .22, but if she needs the 9mm for defense, it will feel exactly the same to her.
      I thought you needed home defense. Hell, you have an armory there. I think it's covered already.
      ecw3 likes this.

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