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  1. #1
    PCZ
    PCZ is offline
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    Wink Cleaning my new Browning Buck Mark plus

    123
    I just received my new Browning Buck Mark Plus. In reading the manufacturer supplied booklet, I believe it is OK to use a pistol cleaning rod and pass oil into the front of the barrel without disassembly. I say this because it says to run the rod "back and forth". In cleaning my Kimber micro 380, which has rifling in the barrel it clearly says to field strip the weapon and pass the rod from the breach forward only. I can't find any information that indicates if the Browning Buck Mark has rifling in the barrel. Can anyone help me with this so I do not damage my new 22 pistol?

    Thanks,
    PCZ

  2. #2
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    1. Most of today's pistols, including yours, have rifled barrels. Empty the gun completely, lock its slide open, and look down the barrel toward a light source. The spiral that you see is the rifling.
    2. Cleaning with a metal rod would best be done from the breech end. The muzzle end of the rifling does much to control your pistol's inherent accuracy, but using a rod from the muzzle end will wear away that part of the rifling. If you can find a rod guide, which prevents the rod from contacting the muzzle, you might clean from the muzzle. But it's better to use the rod from the breech.

    When cleaning from the breech end, do your best to keep the rod from touching the barrel's muzzle by stopping your stroke while the some of the patch or brush is still within the barrel. This will eventually ruin a brush, but brushes are cheap, compared to barrels. And patches clean better on the return stroke, because they fit more tightly in the barrel.

    If you still prefer to not disassemble the pistol for cleaning, don't use a rod. Instead, use the appropriate size of "bore snake," a fabric-and-bronze-brush device that is flexible enough to be inserted into any barrel from the breech without first requiring pistol disassembly.

    BTW: Rimfire guns don't require a lot of cleaning. Don't obsess about it. Mostly, remove the gunk and dirt from your pistol's action, keep the whole thing very lightly oiled to prevent rust, and pass a cleaning device through its barrel every couple of months.

    Side Note: As a new shooter, do not expect accuracy from your pistol. That is, your new pistol is much more accurate than you are, and you will need to learn good shooting technique before your new pistol will deliver satisfactory accuracy in your hands. Shooting a pistol is not easy, and the learning curve is steep.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Youtube has a video on everything
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...N-x0bQH2RaBtMg

  4. #4
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    ...BTW: Rimfire guns don't require a lot of cleaning...
    This is a slight mis-statement. It's what happens when we gurus enter second childhood. We drool a lot, too.

    Truth: The bores of rimfire barrels do not require a lot of cleaning. But you still have to clean away all of the rimfire gunk that the gun's action will accumulate.

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