Results 1 to 19 of 19
Like Tree7Likes
  • 1 Post By high pockets
  • 1 Post By Steve M1911A1
  • 1 Post By Steve M1911A1
  • 1 Post By Bob Wright
  • 1 Post By SailDesign
  • 1 Post By pic
  • 1 Post By Bob Wright

Thread: Engineering Question

  1. #1
    acepilot's Avatar
    acepilot is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    197

    Engineering Question

    Got to wondering today...

    Would it be possible to manufacture semi-auto handguns with the ejection port on the left side (for right handed shooters) instead of the normal right hand side?

    The reason I ask is, wouldn't it be easier to clear an empty casing that got stuck (like a stovepipe) if the port was on the left? By rotating your right wrist a bit over 90 degrees to the left (more natural) and racking the slide to let gravity remove the fouled round/casing?

    Of course, a normal gun would work this way for lefties already...

    Ace

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Georgia, for now
    Posts
    452
    There have been a few left side ejection 1911 style handguns made (Cabot, Mitchell) but they never caught on. I guess the purists were never interested, and there were not enough lefties to make the guns worthwhile to produce.

  3. #3
    ronin11 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Palm Beach County
    Posts
    49
    http://i1312.photobucket.com/albums/...ps400d4268.jpg

    http://i1312.photobucket.com/albums/...psc8122a2c.jpg

    1. Walther P5
    2. Walther P5 Compact

    both with left side ejection port(s)

  4. #4
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,381
    "Stovepipe" jams always point outwards from the ejection port. Mostly, they seem to point upwards.
    Clearing one is pretty quick and easy, if you practice the trick.

    All you need do is to quickly and forcefully slide your hand along the gun's slide, from front to rear.
    The edge of your palm strikes the stovepiped case, and it just flips right out.

    Following that, you probably should do a quick rack, to make sure that a live case is in the pistol's chamber.
    You may lose a perfectly good live cartridge by doing that, but I suggest that it's worth the waste to make sure that the next trigger press ends in a "BANG!"

    A left-side ejection port would toss your empties onto some part of your body, or even back at your face, much more often than a right-ejecting port would.
    In my mind, a pistol's ejection port should be as large as possible, and as open across the slide's top as possible, to make clearance of any kind of jam much easier, using only the fingers.

  5. #5
    acepilot's Avatar
    acepilot is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    197
    Quote Originally Posted by high pockets View Post
    There have been a few left side ejection 1911 style handguns made (Cabot, Mitchell) but they never caught on. I guess the purists were never interested, and there were not enough lefties to make the guns worthwhile to produce.
    My thought is that left ejecting ports would be better for righties and right ejecting ports would be better for lefties, so to me, most guns are already made for lefties...at least for clearing jams.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Georgia, for now
    Posts
    452
    Being a lefty, I have lots of experience with the vagaries of the right ejection port, and have found no advantage to having the occasional spent cartridge come back and land in my glasses, my shirt, on my right arm. I see no advantage to having a right ejection porrt. Any possible advantage gained in clearing jams is more than offset by having to duck flying brass, and believe me, more brass hits me than I ever have jams. When I do shoot wrong-handed, I never have those issues. Just moving the pistol a couple inches right, eliminates all instances of getting hit by brass.

    If you practice the tap-rack-bang, as Steve mentioned above, there is really no rolling of the pistol at all.

    JMO, YMMV

    If, however, you want a left ejecting semi-auto pistol, by all means I hope you find one. Then you could report back to the forum and you would have some practical information rather than theorizing. I, for one, would be interested in hearing about some first hand experience.
    SailDesign likes this.

  7. #7
    SailDesign's Avatar
    SailDesign is online now Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    RI
    Posts
    412
    I'd be interested in one of them, as another leftie. I am sick of my little Ruger MkIII sending something out onto my weak hand when firing that gives me a little slice on my index finger in two places. Like a little paper cut. The cases I don't seem to be hit by (except the Beretta.....) but the little "something" is a pain in the .. hand.

  8. #8
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,381
    A talented and experienced pistolsmith can "tune" a pistol's extractor and ejector, to make empties fly out in a different pattern, thereby saving your index finger for other, more appropriate uses.


    When I was shooting competitively, a guy came to practice with his expertly-tuned 1911. He told us that his 'smith had done such a good job on it that all of his empties would fall into a five-gallon bucket placed "just so."
    He demonstrated how accurately his pistol ejected, and, indeed, every one of his empty cases fell right into the bucket!
    However, his hits were scattered all over the target...
    SailDesign likes this.

  9. #9
    SailDesign's Avatar
    SailDesign is online now Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    RI
    Posts
    412
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    A talented and experienced pistolsmith can "tune" a pistol's extractor and ejector, to make empties fly out in a different pattern, thereby saving your index finger for other, more appropriate uses.


    When I was shooting competitively, a guy came to practice with his expertly-tuned 1911. He told us that his 'smith had done such a good job on it that all of his empties would fall into a five-gallon bucket placed "just so."
    He demonstrated how accurately his pistol ejected, and, indeed, every one of his empty cases fell right into the bucket!
    However, his hits were scattered all over the target...


    I took my wife to the range yesterday, her first time shooting pretty much ever. Even hired someone to teach her so it wasn't me. They were in the lane to my left, and her empties kept hitting my barrel... Didn't do my accuracy any good.

  10. #10
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,381
    It was just a, um, competitively-tuned extractor.
    (Well, maybe I should've written "a competitively-tuned distractor.")
    SailDesign likes this.

  11. #11
    SailDesign's Avatar
    SailDesign is online now Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    RI
    Posts
    412
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    It was just a, um, competitively-tuned extractor.
    (Well, maybe I should've written "a competitively-tuned distractor.")
    It was also my excuse for my shooting that day - will have to find another one soon.

  12. #12
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,548
    The idea of having the ejection port on the right side of the pisto was to prevent its throwing empty hulls back into the shooter's face.

    Bob Wright
    pic likes this.

  13. #13
    SailDesign's Avatar
    SailDesign is online now Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    RI
    Posts
    412
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Wright View Post
    The idea of having the ejection port on the right side of the pisto was to prevent its throwing empty hulls back into the shooter's face.

    Bob Wright
    Because everybody knows there are no left-handers that shoot.... Sorry - that's left-WINGERS.
    acepilot likes this.

  14. #14
    acepilot's Avatar
    acepilot is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    197
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Wright View Post
    The idea of having the ejection port on the right side of the pisto was to prevent its throwing empty hulls back into the shooter's face.

    Bob Wright
    Yeah, I'll surrender that this was a stupid idea. Just some musings as I was sittin' on the throne one morning. However, I still think there might be a tiny bit of merit in the idea...I mean, if you're holding the pistol out in front of your face with arms fully extended, how much difference in distance (side to side) is there if it's lined up in front of your right eye or in front of your left eye. I've still been whacked in the forehead a few times shooting right-handed with my right side ejection ports.

  15. #15
    pic
    pic is online now Senior Member HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,554
    N
    Quote Originally Posted by acepilot View Post
    Yeah, I'll surrender that this was a stupid idea. Just some musings as I was sittin' on the throne one morning. However, I still think there might be a tiny bit of merit in the idea...I mean, if you're holding the pistol out in front of your face with arms fully extended, how much difference in distance (side to side) is there if it's lined up in front of your right eye or in front of your left eye. I've still been whacked in the forehead a few times shooting right-handed with my right side ejection ports.
    Not a crazy thought,,
    Some might practice with arms close and not fully extended

  16. #16
    pic
    pic is online now Senior Member HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,554

  17. #17
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,548
    I do have to admit to being out of my baliwick here, as none of my guns throw away that precious brass!



    Each one just waits until I'm ready and deposits my empty hulls into my waiting hand.

    Bob Wright
    pic likes this.

  18. #18
    OldManMontgomery's Avatar
    OldManMontgomery is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Hastings, Nebraska; the Heartland!
    Posts
    39
    As long as we're taking about engineering, why not...

    Make the 'ejection port' on the slide open on both sides, leaving the sides (the bottom half anyway) and a solid brace down the center of the top intact to give maximum strength to the slide AND THEN, arrange for the breech face to be reversable so the shooter can set the arm to eject either left or right as needed?

    It would jack the manufacturing costs up. One cannot have everything.

  19. #19
    pic
    pic is online now Senior Member HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,554
    Ty
    Quote Originally Posted by OldManMontgomery View Post
    As long as we're taking about engineering, why not...

    Make the 'ejection port' on the slide open on both sides, leaving the sides (the bottom half anyway) and a solid brace down the center of the top intact to give maximum strength to the slide AND THEN, arrange for the breech face to be reversable so the shooter can set the arm to eject either left or right as needed?

    It would jack the manufacturing costs up. One cannot have everything.
    Beretta already have a few models with wide open ejection ports, I think.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1