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  1. #1
    youngvet24's Avatar
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    Question about striker fired weapons.

    How exactly does the internal safety work on striker fired weapons I.e., glock, m&p, xd? I kinda understand the general concept of how the striker works but still confused on the whole "3 internal safeties" part. Any input would be nice. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Cait43's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    THERE IS ONLY ONE PRINCIPAL SAFETY ON EVERY GLOCK PISTOL - ONE! IT IS THAT LITTLE LEVER IN THE MIDDLE OF A GLOCK TRIGGER'S FACE.

    Forget the striker safety block. It is, actually, an ancillary instead of a primary pistol safety. The striker safety on a Glock is highly susceptible to: vibratory, impulse, or impact release; AND, if that happens, then, your Glock is likely to accidentally discharge.

    Neither is Glock's, so-called, 'drop safety' a principal safety mechanism - Once again the, so-called, 'drop safety' performs a mainly ancillary function. It will NOT prevent your Glock from firing if it hits the ground hard - Contrary to both popular opinion and conventional, 'internet gun forum wisdom' all Glock's, so-called, 'drop safety' is going to do is to insure that:

    IF EVERYTHING ELSE FUNCTIONS AS IT SHOULD THEN AFTER BEING DROPPED, HARD, A GLOCK PISTOL WILL CONTINUE TO FIRE THE NEXT TIME THE TRIGGER IS PULLED! THATíS IT!

    (Very few people are aware of these important Glock, 'striker firing system' mechanical idiosyncrasies! Why? you might wonder: Because what those dual wings on Glock's trigger bar actually do is to prevent the, 'sear plate' from becoming jammed behind the back of the striker lug whenever a Glock pistol falls, hard - THAT is, 'Why'.)

  4. #4
    SouthernBoy's Avatar
    SouthernBoy is online now Senior Member
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    In my opinon, of the three safeties on a Glock pistol one is pretty much joke and that is the trigger safety. Again, this is my opinion. My reason for saying this is anything can depress that trigger. A flap of leather from a worn holster. A piece of a shirt tail or jacket draw string. You name it. So it is essentially useless as far as I'm concerned.

    The two internal safeties are well designed and work quite well. I have dropped a loaded Glock 23 on a concrete floor from a height of around 3 1/2 feel, hitting on a top rear corner of the slide, and nothing happened. Not even a mark on the slide for that matter.

    The M&P design works a little differently than does the Glock. It has a trigger safety and a striker block safety, but it uses a sear that rotates on an axis, kind of like a seesaw, to hold the striker in a fully cocked position rather than a design similar to the Glock where the sear is moved rearward and then down to release the striker. If the trigger is not pulled to the rear through the second stage, then the gun won't fire. Simple as that.

    Any mechanical device can fail so the best safety is the one between one's ears. But the striker block safety and the cruciform drop safety are good designs and do work rather beautifully.

  5. #5
    robkarrob is offline Junior Member
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    The M&Ps' and XDs' have an internal striker blocker in the slide. When the trigger is pulled back, just prior to reaching the break point, the blocker is pushed up, which allows the blocker to clear the striker. This allows the striker, when it is released by the sear, to move fully forward and contact the primer. If the trigger is not pulled back, the blocker remains down, and "blocks" the striker's path, so it can not travel forward and strike the primer. This is the internal safety, that prevents the gun from firing, unless the trigger is pulled to just before the break point.

    Bob

  6. #6
    youngvet24's Avatar
    youngvet24 is offline Member
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    Thanks for the replys. I was kinda hesitant on these because im not used to having a loaded gun without a manual safety. Not because im incompetent but its just different I guess. But theyve been proven time and time again

  7. #7
    youngvet24's Avatar
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    Bob thats the answer I was looking for. Thanks for breaking it down barney style for me

  8. #8
    Desertrat's Avatar
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    It is pretty simple....but ingenious at the same time.

  9. #9
    youngvet24's Avatar
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    Yeah ill give you that. The first time I shot one it was awkward because I didnt understand the no safety thing.

  10. #10
    youngvet24's Avatar
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    Yeah ill give you that. The first time I shot one it was awkward because I didnt understand the no safety thing.

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